26013

Journal, December 1841–December 1842

Elder John Snider

11 Feb. 1800–19 Dec. 1875. Farmer, mason, stonecutter. Born in New Brunswick, Canada. Son of Martin Snyder and Sarah Armstrong. Married Mary Heron, 28 Feb. 1822. Baptized into LDS church, 1836, at Toronto. Ordained a priest, before 1837. Served mission to...

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Recivied his final instructions from the President, & received his blessing from Prest Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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. with the Laying on of the hands of Prest. Joseph. John E. Page

25 Feb. 1799–14 Oct. 1867. Born at Trenton, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Ebenezer Page and Rachel Hill. Married first Betsey Thompson, 1831, in Huron Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church by Emer Harris, 18 Aug. 1833, at Brownhelm, Lorain Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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. & Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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. & Started for England same day.148

Although Snider was appointed on 22 December 1841 to serve a mission to Europe, he had not left by 28 January 1842, at which time the Quorum of the Twelve directed him to go. He returned from England 23 January 1843. (JS, Journal, 22 Dec. 1841; 28 Jan. 1842; 23 Jan. 1843.)  


27 March 1842 • Sunday

Sunday 27th Baptized 107 individuals after speaking on baptism for the Dead149

Wilford Woodruff reported that JS said on this occasion that the Bible supported the concept of baptism for the dead and that if persons living could be baptized, those who were deceased could receive the same privilege. Although JS’s discourse was on baptism for the dead, at least some of the baptisms performed this day were rebaptisms for living people—including Woodruff and John Taylor. Following the baptisms, the Saints assembled, as on the 20 March occasion, near the temple for confirmations. (Woodruff, Journal, 27 Mar. 1842.)  


and witnessed the landing of 150 English brethren from the Steam boat Ariel150

According to The Wasp, the Aeriel carried “some hundred and fifty or two hundred emigrants . . . from Eng[l]and, accompanied by Elder Lyman Wight and eighty or ninety more from Mississippi.” Wight later recalled returning to Nauvoo with “47,500 lbs of sugar & molasses and 10 sacks of coffee, a small quantity of dry goods and 100 mormon passengers.” (“Emigration,” The Wasp, 16 Apr. 1842, [2]; Lyman Wight, Mountain Valley, TX, to Wilford Woodruff, [Salt Lake City, Utah Territory], 24 Aug. 1857, p. 11, Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, ca. 1858–1880, CHL.)  


28 March 1842 • Monday

Monday 28 Received Parley P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

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s donations from England.151

Pratt, who was presiding over the church’s congregations in England, forwarded by the hand of Stephen Nixon seven donations, totaling $250, from church members there. (Book of the Law of the Lord, 103.)  


and transacted other business at the office

Term usually applies to JS’s private office, which was located at various places during JS’s lifetime, including his home and red brick store. While in JS’s red brick store, office served as church headquarters and location where JS kept his sacred writings...

More Info
.

29 March 1842 • Tuesday

Tuesday 29 [2 lines blank]

30 March 1842 • Wednesday

Wednesday 30 [2 lines blank]

31 March 1842 • Thursday

Thursday 31 In council at his office with. Elders Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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. John Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

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&c. & wrote an Epistle to the Female Relief Socity and spake to the Socity in the afternoon.152

The minutes of the Female Relief Society mistakenly indicate that the meeting was held on 30 March. The “Epistle,” recorded following the minutes of the Relief Society meeting on 28 September 1842, cautioned the sisters to be wary of immoral individuals who claimed authority from JS or other church leaders to commit sin. The epistle may have been the “article” that the minutes report Emma Smith as reading during the afternoon meeting. In JS’s afternoon discourse, he explained that the society should be “separate from all the evils of the world, choice, virtuous and holy” and that they should be careful to determine the worthiness of those admitted into the society. (Relief Society Minute Book, [31] Mar. 1842, 86–88.)  


1 April 1842 • Friday

April Friday 1 at the General Business office

Term usually applies to JS’s private office, which was located at various places during JS’s lifetime, including his home and red brick store. While in JS’s red brick store, office served as church headquarters and location where JS kept his sacred writings...

More Info

2 April 1842 • Saturday

Saturday 2 Paid Hugh Rhodes $1150. for a Farm154

Possibly the final payment for 153½ acres of land in the northeast quarter of Section 8 and northwest quarter of Section 9 within Township 6 North, Range 8 West, that JS contracted to buy from Erie Rhodes on 16 September 1841 for $3,000. Hugh Rhodes was the administrator for the estate of Erie Rhodes, who died October 1841. (Hancock Co., IL, Bonds and Mortgages, vol. 1, pp. 228–229, microfilm 954,776, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL; Hancock Co., IL, Probate Record, vol. A, p. 119, microfilm 954,481, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  


3 April 1842 • Sunday

Sunday 3 [2 lines blank]

4 April 1842 • Monday

Monday 4 Transacted business at his house with Josiah Butterfield

13 Mar. 1795–3 Mar. 1871. Farmer, stockman. Born at Dunstable, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Abel Butterfield and Mercy Farnsworth. Married first Polly Moulton, 30 Oct. 1819. Moved to Buxton, York Co., Maine, 1820. Baptized into LDS church by John ...

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concerning the Lawrence estates.155

After the death of Edward Lawrence in November or December 1839, JS was appointed on 4 June 1841 as guardian of the Lawrence children and received title to their assets. Margaret Lawrence, Edward’s widow, married Butterfield on 24 December 1840. (Madsen, “Joseph Smith as Guardian,” 172–173, 179, 181–187.)  


& closed a Settlement with Wm Marks

15 Nov. 1792–22 May 1872. Farmer, printer, publisher, postmaster. Born at Rutland, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Cornell (Cornwall) Marks and Sarah Goodrich. Married first Rosannah R. Robinson, 2 May 1813. Lived at Portage, Allegany Co., New York, where he...

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in the counting Room.156

A promissory note written by JS on this date stated he would “pay Wm Marks or bearer Two hundrd and eighty nine dollars in goods at the brick store from time to time as my circumstances will admit.” (Promissory note, JS to William Marks, 4 Apr. 1842, JS Collection, CHL.)  


5 April 1842 • Tuesday

Tuesday 5 Settled with Bro William Niswanger157

William Niswanger paid $800 on this date for land in block seventy-one of the Hotchkiss purchase. (Trustees Land Book A, Hotchkiss Purchase, block 71, lot 2, [124].)  


6 April 1842 • Wednesday

Wednesday 6 With his family. and several of the Twelve. viz. Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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Heber C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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. Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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. & gave instructions how to organize & adjourn the special conference.158

This was the first day of a three-day conference held 6–8 April 1842. The conference was not termed a “general conference” because JS announced in October 1841 that there would not be another “general” conference until the completion of the temple in Nauvoo. (“Conference Minutes,” Times and Seasons, 15 Apr. 1842, 3:761–763.)  


it being so wet & cold that it was not prudent to continue the meeting & the presidents health would not admit of his going out. at his house also. the Patriarch

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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159 and the Twelve present bore Testimony to the principles of virtue which they had invariably heard taught by Joseph.

7 April 1842 • Thursday

Thursday 7 Spoke to the conference in the grove & replied to Elder John E. Page

25 Feb. 1799–14 Oct. 1867. Born at Trenton, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Ebenezer Page and Rachel Hill. Married first Betsey Thompson, 1831, in Huron Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church by Emer Harris, 18 Aug. 1833, at Brownhelm, Lorain Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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’.s communication. Shewing the cause of his Seperation from Elder Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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. in his mission to Jerusalem

Capital city of ancient Judea. Holy city of Christians, Jews, and Muslims. Population in 1835 about 11,000; in 1840 about 13,000; and in 1850 about 15,000. Described in 1836 as “greatly reduced from its ancient size and importance.” Occupied and governed ...

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.160

In April 1840, Hyde and Page were appointed to serve a mission to London, Amsterdam, Constantinople, Jerusalem, and “other places” to “converse with the priests, rulers and Elders of the Jews, and obtain from them” the “present views and movements of the Jewish people.” After “obtain[ing] from them all the information possible,” they were to “communicate the same to some principal paper for publication, that it may have a general circulation throughout the United States.” The two men started their mission together but separated after a time—Hyde continuing on to Jerusalem and Page eventually returning to Nauvoo. At the April 1842 conference, Page explained that he and Hyde separated during their fund-raising activities and Hyde left for Europe earlier than they had originally intended. After Page’s remarks, JS stated there was no great harm done in the separation, and a vote of the conference affirmed that Page was to remain in full fellowship. (JS, “To All People unto Whom These Presents Shall Come,” Times and Seasons, Apr. 1840, 1:86; “Conference Minutes,” Times and Seasons, 15 Apr. 1842, 3:761–763.)  


first a covenant to communicate to each other all secrets.161

Hyde and Page evidently made a covenant of secrecy with each other, although the conference minutes do not record a statement by Page to that effect. JS responded that such a covenant was wrong, as it “created a lack of confidence for two men to covenant to reveal all acts of secrecy or otherwise to each other.” (“Conference Minutes,” Times and Seasons, 15 Apr. 1842, 3:762.)  


[p. 92]
Elder John Snider

11 Feb. 1800–19 Dec. 1875. Farmer, mason, stonecutter. Born in New Brunswick, Canada. Son of Martin Snyder and Sarah Armstrong. Married Mary Heron, 28 Feb. 1822. Baptized into LDS church, 1836, at Toronto. Ordained a priest, before 1837. Served mission to...

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Recivied his final inst[r]uctions from the President,  & received his blessing from Prest B[righam] Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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. with the Laying on of the  hands of Prest. Joseph. J[ohn] E. Page

25 Feb. 1799–14 Oct. 1867. Born at Trenton, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Ebenezer Page and Rachel Hill. Married first Betsey Thompson, 1831, in Huron Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church by Emer Harris, 18 Aug. 1833, at Brownhelm, Lorain Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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. & W[illard] Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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. & Started for England  same day.148

Although Snider was appointed on 22 December 1841 to serve a mission to Europe, he had not left by 28 January 1842, at which time the Quorum of the Twelve directed him to go. He returned from England 23 January 1843. (JS, Journal, 22 Dec. 1841; 28 Jan. 1842; 23 Jan. 1843.)  


27 March 1842 • Sunday

Sunday 27[th] Baptized 107 individuals after speaking on baptism for the Dead149

Wilford Woodruff reported that JS said on this occasion that the Bible supported the concept of baptism for the dead and that if persons living could be baptized, those who were deceased could receive the same privilege. Although JS’s discourse was on baptism for the dead, at least some of the baptisms performed this day were rebaptisms for living people—including Woodruff and John Taylor. Following the baptisms, the Saints assembled, as on the 20 March occasion, near the temple for confirmations. (Woodruff, Journal, 27 Mar. 1842.)  


 and witnessed the landing of 150 English brethren from the Steam boat Ariel150

According to The Wasp, the Aeriel carried “some hundred and fifty or two hundred emigrants . . . from Eng[l]and, accompanied by Elder Lyman Wight and eighty or ninety more from Mississippi.” Wight later recalled returning to Nauvoo with “47,500 lbs of sugar & molasses and 10 sacks of coffee, a small quantity of dry goods and 100 mormon passengers.” (“Emigration,” The Wasp, 16 Apr. 1842, [2]; Lyman Wight, Mountain Valley, TX, to Wilford Woodruff, [Salt Lake City, Utah Territory], 24 Aug. 1857, p. 11, Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, ca. 1858–1880, CHL.)  


28 March 1842 • Monday

Monday 28 Received P[arley] P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

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s donations from England.151

Pratt, who was presiding over the church’s congregations in England, forwarded by the hand of Stephen Nixon seven donations, totaling $250, from church members there. (Book of the Law of the Lord, 103.)  


and transacted  other business at the office

Term usually applies to JS’s private office, which was located at various places during JS’s lifetime, including his home and red brick store. While in JS’s red brick store, office served as church headquarters and location where JS kept his sacred writings...

More Info
.

29 March 1842 • Tuesday

Tuesday 29 [2 lines blank]

30 March 1842 • Wednesday

Wednesday 30 [2 lines blank]

31 March 1842 • Thursday

Thursday 31 In council at his office with. Elders [Brigham] Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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. [John] Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

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&c.  & wrote an Epistle to the Female Relief Socity  and spake to the Socity in the afternoon.152

The minutes of the Female Relief Society mistakenly indicate that the meeting was held on 30 March. The “Epistle,” recorded following the minutes of the Relief Society meeting on 28 September 1842, cautioned the sisters to be wary of immoral individuals who claimed authority from JS or other church leaders to commit sin. The epistle may have been the “article” that the minutes report Emma Smith as reading during the afternoon meeting. In JS’s afternoon discourse, he explained that the society should be “separate from all the evils of the world, choice, virtuous and holy” and that they should be careful to determine the worthiness of those admitted into the society. (Relief Society Minute Book, [31] Mar. 1842, 86–88.)  


1 April 1842 • Friday

April153

TEXT: “April” is triple underlined.  


Friday 1 at the General Business office

Term usually applies to JS’s private office, which was located at various places during JS’s lifetime, including his home and red brick store. While in JS’s red brick store, office served as church headquarters and location where JS kept his sacred writings...

More Info

2 April 1842 • Saturday

Saturday 2 Paid Hugh Rhodes $1150. for a Farm154

Possibly the final payment for 153½ acres of land in the northeast quarter of Section 8 and northwest quarter of Section 9 within Township 6 North, Range 8 West, that JS contracted to buy from Erie Rhodes on 16 September 1841 for $3,000. Hugh Rhodes was the administrator for the estate of Erie Rhodes, who died October 1841. (Hancock Co., IL, Bonds and Mortgages, vol. 1, pp. 228–229, microfilm 954,776, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL; Hancock Co., IL, Probate Record, vol. A, p. 119, microfilm 954,481, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  


3 April 1842 • Sunday

Sunday 3 [2 lines blank]

4 April 1842 • Monday

Monday 4 Transacted business at his house with Josiah Butterfie[l]d

13 Mar. 1795–3 Mar. 1871. Farmer, stockman. Born at Dunstable, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Abel Butterfield and Mercy Farnsworth. Married first Polly Moulton, 30 Oct. 1819. Moved to Buxton, York Co., Maine, 1820. Baptized into LDS church by John ...

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 concerning the Lawrence estates.155

After the death of Edward Lawrence in November or December 1839, JS was appointed on 4 June 1841 as guardian of the Lawrence children and received title to their assets. Margaret Lawrence, Edward’s widow, married Butterfield on 24 December 1840. (Madsen, “Joseph Smith as Guardian,” 172–173, 179, 181–187.)  


& closed a Settlement  with Wm Marks

15 Nov. 1792–22 May 1872. Farmer, printer, publisher, postmaster. Born at Rutland, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of Cornell (Cornwall) Marks and Sarah Goodrich. Married first Rosannah R. Robinson, 2 May 1813. Lived at Portage, Allegany Co., New York, where he...

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in the counting Room.156

A promissory note written by JS on this date stated he would “pay Wm Marks or bearer Two hundrd and eighty nine dollars in goods at the brick store from time to time as my circumstances will admit.” (Promissory note, JS to William Marks, 4 Apr. 1842, JS Collection, CHL.)  


5 April 1842 • Tuesday

Tuesday 5 Settled with Bro [William] Niswanger157

William Niswanger paid $800 on this date for land in block seventy-one of the Hotchkiss purchase. (Trustees Land Book A, Hotchkiss Purchase, block 71, lot 2, [124].)  


6 April 1842 • Wednesday

Wednesday 6 With his family. and several of the Twelve. viz. B[righam] Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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 H[eber] C. Kimball

14 June 1801–22 June 1868. Blacksmith, potter. Born at Sheldon, Franklin Co., Vermont. Son of Solomon Farnham Kimball and Anna Spaulding. Married Vilate Murray, 22 Nov. 1822, at Mendon, Monroe Co., New York. Member of Baptist church at Mendon, 1831. Baptized...

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. W[illard] Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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. & gave instructions how to open organize &  adjourn the special conference.158

This was the first day of a three-day conference held 6–8 April 1842. The conference was not termed a “general conference” because JS announced in October 1841 that there would not be another “general” conference until the completion of the temple in Nauvoo. (“Conference Minutes,” Times and Seasons, 15 Apr. 1842, 3:761–763.)  


it being so wet & cold  that it was not prudent to continue the meeting & the  presidents health would not admit of his going out.  at his house also. the Patriarch

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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159 and the Twelve present  bore Testimony to the principles of virtue which they  had invariably heard taught by Joseph.

7 April 1842 • Thursday

Thursday 7 Spoke to the conference in the grove & replied to Elder  John E. Page

25 Feb. 1799–14 Oct. 1867. Born at Trenton, Oneida Co., New York. Son of Ebenezer Page and Rachel Hill. Married first Betsey Thompson, 1831, in Huron Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church by Emer Harris, 18 Aug. 1833, at Brownhelm, Lorain Co., Ohio. Ordained...

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’.s communication. Shewing the cause of his  Seperation from Elder [Orson] Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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. on in his mission to Jerusalem

Capital city of ancient Judea. Holy city of Christians, Jews, and Muslims. Population in 1835 about 11,000; in 1840 about 13,000; and in 1850 about 15,000. Described in 1836 as “greatly reduced from its ancient size and importance.” Occupied and governed ...

More Info
.160

In April 1840, Hyde and Page were appointed to serve a mission to London, Amsterdam, Constantinople, Jerusalem, and “other places” to “converse with the priests, rulers and Elders of the Jews, and obtain from them” the “present views and movements of the Jewish people.” After “obtain[ing] from them all the information possible,” they were to “communicate the same to some principal paper for publication, that it may have a general circulation throughout the United States.” The two men started their mission together but separated after a time—Hyde continuing on to Jerusalem and Page eventually returning to Nauvoo. At the April 1842 conference, Page explained that he and Hyde separated during their fund-raising activities and Hyde left for Europe earlier than they had originally intended. After Page’s remarks, JS stated there was no great harm done in the separation, and a vote of the conference affirmed that Page was to remain in full fellowship. (JS, “To All People unto Whom These Presents Shall Come,” Times and Seasons, Apr. 1840, 1:86; “Conference Minutes,” Times and Seasons, 15 Apr. 1842, 3:761–763.)  


 first a covenant to communicate to each other all secrets.161

Hyde and Page evidently made a covenant of secrecy with each other, although the conference minutes do not record a statement by Page to that effect. JS responded that such a covenant was wrong, as it “created a lack of confidence for two men to covenant to reveal all acts of secrecy or otherwise to each other.” (“Conference Minutes,” Times and Seasons, 15 Apr. 1842, 3:762.)  


[p. 92]
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JS, Journal, Dec. 1841–Dec. 1842; handwriting of William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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, Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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, Eliza R. Snow

21 Jan. 1804–5 Dec. 1887. Poet, teacher, seamstress, milliner. Born in Becket, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Oliver Snow and Rosetta Leonora Pettibone. Moved to Mantua, Trumbull Co., Ohio, ca. 1806. Member of Baptist church. Baptized into LDS ...

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, and Erastus Derby

14 Sept. 1810–3 Dec. 1890. Tailor, carpenter, farmer, joiner. Born in Hawley, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Edward Darby and Ruth Phoebe Hitchcock. Moved to Ohio, by 1834. Married Ruhamah Burnham Knowlton, 10 Aug. 1834, in Carthage, Hamilton Co., Ohio...

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; signatures of William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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and Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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; 90 pages; in “The Book of the Law of the Lord,” Record Book, 1841–1845, CHL. Includes shorthand; also includes redactions and use marks.
JS’s journal for December 1841–December 1842 was inscribed in a large, leather-bound blank book made with thick paper. The paper bears a star-shaped watermark in the middle of each leaf and was printed with forty-seven blue lines on each side. The text block was originally formed with thirty gatherings of eight leaves each. The second gathering, however, has only six leaves. This six-leaf gathering was either a binding error or one sheet came loose from the binding before the book was inscribed (the book’s inscription and pagination runs through this gathering without skipping any text or page numbers). The gatherings were sewn all along. Each set of front and back endpapers consisted of a gathering of four leaves of unlined paper, but only two leaves are now extant in the back gathering. The trimmed pages measure 16¼ × 10½ inches (41 × 27 cm). Headbands were sewn onto the text block. The exterior pages of the endpapers are joined to the pasteboards with a strip of pink cloth. Marbled papers featuring a shell pattern with green body and veins of red and yellow are glued to the inside covers of the boards and to the exterior page of each gathering of endpapers. The leaf edges are stained green. The text block is bound in a ledger style to the boards. The spine was constructed with four false raised bands demarcating five panels. The boards and spine are covered in suede leather with additional leather strips over the top and bottom of the book. The suede leather was blind tooled on the outside covers, the raised bands of the spine, and the turned-in edges on the inside cover. The additional leather strips, which also cover the first and fifth panels of the spine, are embossed with dual lines and vegetal designs along the borders and have gold line filling. The spine is further embossed with the number “6” in 20-point type on the fifth panel. The second and fourth panels have black-painted squares of paper glued to them. These feature gold lining and decoration at the top and bottom. The completed volume measures 17 × 11 × 2¼ inches (43 × 28 × 6 cm) and includes 244 free leaves. A penciled inscription at the inside top corner of page [ii]—the verso of the front marbled flyleaf—gives what appears to be an expensive price for this high-quality blank book: “bth | 10.00”.
Robert B. Thompson

1 Oct. 1811–27 Aug. 1841. Clerk, editor. Born in Great Driffield, Yorkshire, England. Member of Methodist church. Immigrated to Upper Canada, 1834. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt, May 1836, in Upper Canada. Ordained an elder by John Taylor, 22...

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inscribed nine revelations in the book on the first twenty-three pages of lined paper. Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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made minor revisions to these revelation texts. Apparently either Richards or Thompson inscribed page numbers on pages 3­–18, beginning at the first page of lined paper, in a stylized script. Richards inscribed page numbers on pages 19–25 as well as on the next several dozen pages—which included journal entries for JS and records of donations in cash and in kind for the construction of the Nauvoo temple

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

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. At some point page [1], the recto of the last leaf of unlined endpaper in the front of the book, was inscribed with a title: “THE | BOOK | of the | LAW | of the | LORD”. Because these words are hand lettered in various ornate styles, the handwriting cannot be identified. A matching title appears on the spine of the volume: the square label of black paper on the second panel of the spine bears a smaller square label of white paper with a hand-lettered inscription: “LAW | — of the — | LORD.” Willard Richards inscribed pages 26–126 of the book, with help from William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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on pages 27–28 and 72–87. Clayton inscribed the rest of the volume, pages 127–477, with help from Erastus Derby

14 Sept. 1810–3 Dec. 1890. Tailor, carpenter, farmer, joiner. Born in Hawley, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Edward Darby and Ruth Phoebe Hitchcock. Moved to Ohio, by 1834. Married Ruhamah Burnham Knowlton, 10 Aug. 1834, in Carthage, Hamilton Co., Ohio...

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on pages 168–171 and from Eliza R. Snow

21 Jan. 1804–5 Dec. 1887. Poet, teacher, seamstress, milliner. Born in Becket, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Oliver Snow and Rosetta Leonora Pettibone. Moved to Mantua, Trumbull Co., Ohio, ca. 1806. Member of Baptist church. Baptized into LDS ...

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on pages 189–190 and 192–201. These clerks and scribes generally paginated the book and inscribed dateline page headers along the way as they inscribed its texts.1

The page numbers on pages 19–71, 86–90, and 122–125 are in the handwriting of Willard Richards; on pages 72–85, 91–121, 126–167, and 171–477, in the handwriting of William Clayton; and on pages 168–170, in the handwriting of Erastus Derby. There are two pages numbered 453. Pages 476–477 constitute the last leaf of lined paper. The headers generally consist of a year or a month and year. The headers inscribed on pages 26–27, 29–71, 88–95, 119, and 121–126 are in the handwriting of Richards; the headers inscribed on pages 28, 72–87, 96–118, 120, 127–167, and 172–215 are in the handwriting of Clayton; pages 168–171, which were inscribed by Derby, have no headers. A few other pages are missing headers.  


The donation records constitute the bulk of the volume. The journal entries are inscribed on pages 26, 31, 33, 36, 39, 43, 44, 48, 56–61, 66–67, 88–95, 122–135, and 164–215. As is also the case with the pages bearing donation records, many of the pages bearing journal entries have vertical margin lines inscribed in graphite. The journal entries themselves are inscribed in ink that is now brown. Pages 165–181, however, either include or are entirely in blue ink. Some of the entries begin with a descriptive heading as well as a dateline. The entry for 6 January 1842, for example, features the large heading “The New Year”. Page 58 features the large double underlined heading “Journal of President Joseph”. Many of the entries are divided by horizontal lines. Where groups of journal entries span several pages, notes written at the beginning and end of these spans reference the previous or succeeding pages of journal entries.2

For example, page 135 points the reader to page 164, which begins by noting the continuation from page 135.  


At various stages in the production of the volume, Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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signed their names to their work (pages 126, 181, 215).
The volume contains a number of redactions that were made as the journal entries were later revised for inclusion in the “History of Joseph Smith” published in Mormon newspapers in the mid-nineteenth century.3

This serialized history drew on the journals herein, beginning with the 4 July 1855 issue of the Deseret News and with the 3 January 1857 issue of the LDS Millennial Star.  


Most of these redactions, made in graphite, were subsequently erased.4

Most of these now-erased graphite inscriptions are recoverable with bright white light and magnification. Pages 209–215, which were not erased, represent the state of the journal entries generally when they were used for drafting the “History of Joseph Smith.”  


The upper left-hand corner of page 3 bears the graphite inscription “6”, a redactive note on page 43 is inscribed in purple pencil, and red-penciled “X”s appear in the margins next to entries on pages 164 and 180. Notes written on three white and three blue slips of paper of various sizes have been inserted in various places, as well as a clipped portion of a Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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-era elder’s certificate form with no notes (apparently just a placeholder). There are also two leaves of pink paper just inside the front of the volume. All of these slips and leaves of paper are loose and appear to have been added to the book subsequent to its use as a journal.
The book is intricately related to its successor volume, the 1844–1846 donation record, and to a volume that indexed the donation records.5

Tithing and Donation Record, 1844–1846, CHL; Trustee-in-trust, Index and Accounts, 1841–1847, CHL.  


The “Law of the Lord” is listed as such in inventories of church records made in Salt Lake City, Utah, in the 1850s. These show that the volume was held for a time in the office of church president Brigham Young.6

Historian’s Office, “Inventory. Historian’s Office. 4th April 1855,” [1]; Historian’s Office, “Inventory. Historians Office. G. S. L. City April 1.1857,” [1]; Historian’s Office, “Historian’s Office Inventory G. S. L. City March 19. 1858,” [1]; Historian’s Office, “Historian’s Office Catalogue Book March 1858,” [11], Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL.  


In 1880, John Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

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, president of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, carried the book to a stake Relief Society conference in Salt Lake City.7

Emmeline B. Wells, “Salt Lake Stake Relief Society Conference,” Women’s Exponent, 1 July 1880, 9:22.  


At some point the book was marked on the spine with an archival sticker, which was later removed. The book eventually was housed with the papers of Joseph Fielding Smith, apparently during his tenure as church historian and recorder (1921–1970), and then became part of the First Presidency’s papers when he became church president in 1970.8

“Inventory of President Joseph Fielding Smith’s Safe,” 23 May 1970, First Presidency, General Administration Files, CHL.  


In 2010, the First Presidency gave custody of the book to the Church History Library.9

Letter of transfer, Salt Lake City, UT, 8 Jan. 2010, CHL.  


This evidence indicates continuous institutional custody and authenticity.

Facts