26013

Journal, December 1841–December 1842

a Mob upon us, and as Mr E. Kilbourn

22 Jan. 1814–3 Feb. 1878. Merchant, land speculator, gas manufacturer, railroad operator. Born at Marlborough, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of David Kilbourn(e) and Lydia Welles. Moved to Lee Co., Iowa Territory, by 1839. In partnership with his brother...

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was then present he would have the privilege of either admitting or denying it. Question by E. Kilbourn

22 Jan. 1814–3 Feb. 1878. Merchant, land speculator, gas manufacturer, railroad operator. Born at Marlborough, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of David Kilbourn(e) and Lydia Welles. Moved to Lee Co., Iowa Territory, by 1839. In partnership with his brother...

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“Who did Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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tell that I and my brother were conspiring to bring a mob upon you” Answer by Joseph “He told me and he told [blank] Allred283

Probably William Moore Allred, who married Orissa Bates, sister of Sarah Bates Pratt, on 9 January 1842, with Mayor John C. Bennett officiating. (Allred, Reminiscences and Diary, 8–9.)  


and Orson Pratt

19 Sept. 1811–3 Oct. 1881. Farmer, writer, teacher, merchant, surveyor, editor, publisher. Born at Hartford, Washington Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Moved to New Lebanon, Columbia Co., New York, 1814; to Canaan, Columbia Co., fall...

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s wife & others”. Q by E Kilboun

22 Jan. 1814–3 Feb. 1878. Merchant, land speculator, gas manufacturer, railroad operator. Born at Marlborough, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of David Kilbourn(e) and Lydia Welles. Moved to Lee Co., Iowa Territory, by 1839. In partnership with his brother...

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“Where did he say we were going to bring a mob from”. Ans. by Joseph. “From Galena

County seat. Originally known as the Point; laid out and named Galena, 1826. Principal town in lead-mine country. Received city charter, 1841. Population in 1840 about 1,800. Population in 1845 about 4,000. Several Saints worked in mines while Nauvoo temple...

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”. Mr. Kilbourn

22 Jan. 1814–3 Feb. 1878. Merchant, land speculator, gas manufacturer, railroad operator. Born at Marlborough, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of David Kilbourn(e) and Lydia Welles. Moved to Lee Co., Iowa Territory, by 1839. In partnership with his brother...

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then arose and said, “I was conversing with my brother this morning and he said he had never seen Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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since he had us before him last year for conspiracy.284

Sometime prior to 20 September 1841, David and Edward Kilbourne appeared before John C. Bennett in the mayor’s court on a charge of conspiring to unlawfully procure an indictment. The charge was based on a complaint by Lorenzo Wasson and Orrin Porter Rockwell after the Kilbournes attempted to catch a group of alleged thieves, including Rockwell, in the act of robbing the Kilbournes’ store in Montrose, Iowa Territory. According to the Kilbournes, the charge was “unsustained by a shadow of proof,” and they were discharged by Bennett at Nauvoo. (David Kilbourne and Edward Kilbourne, “Latter-Day-ism, No. 1,” Hawk-Eye and Iowa Patriot [Burlington, IA], 30 Sept. 1841, [1]; see also Bennett, History of the Saints, 93.)  


I have only seen him twice since last fall, I saw him once then. I was going to Galena

County seat. Originally known as the Point; laid out and named Galena, 1826. Principal town in lead-mine country. Received city charter, 1841. Population in 1840 about 1,800. Population in 1845 about 4,000. Several Saints worked in mines while Nauvoo temple...

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about 2 weeks ago. The Boat I was on stopped at the upper Landing place and I came ashore a little while. The first person I saw was Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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; we entered into conversation, but there was no mention made of mobs. I have not seen him since. I always regarded Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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the same as I regard you (Joseph) and thought you were pretty well matched. If any one says that I have conspired to bring a Mob upon you it is false”.285

The Kilbournes wrote three letters attacking the church and JS. On 14 May 1842, David Kilbourne wrote to Missouri governor Thomas Reynolds accusing JS of complicity in the Lilburn W. Boggs assassination attempt and urging his arrest. On 24 June, JS wrote to Illinois governor Thomas Carlin expressing concern about information from Galena, about 160 miles upriver from Nauvoo, that the Kilbournes and Bennett had posted handbills there asking for volunteers to drive out the Mormons and to assist in kidnapping JS. (David Kilbourne and Edward Kilbourne, “Latter-Day-ism, No. 1,” Hawk-Eye and Iowa Patriot [Burlington, IA], 30 Sept. 1841, [1]; David Kilbourne and Edward Kilbourne, “Latter- Day-ism, No. 2,” Hawk-Eye and Iowa Patriot [Burlington, IA], 7 Oct. 1841, [2]; David Kilbourne and Edward Kilbourne, “Latter Day-ism No. 3,” Hawk-Eye and Iowa Patriot [Burlington, IA], 14 Oct. 1841, [3]; David Kilbourne, Montrose, Iowa Territory, to Thomas Reynolds, Jefferson City, MO, 14 May 1842, Thomas Reynolds, Office of Governor, MSA; JS, Nauvoo, IL, to Thomas Carlin, [Quincy, IL], 24 June 1842, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 233–235.)  


The meeting was then peaceably dismissed. O. P.

19 Sept. 1811–3 Oct. 1881. Farmer, writer, teacher, merchant, surveyor, editor, publisher. Born at Hartford, Washington Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Moved to New Lebanon, Columbia Co., New York, 1814; to Canaan, Columbia Co., fall...

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returned at night. He was seen about 2 miles this side Warsaw

Located at foot of Des Moines Rapids of Mississippi River at site of three military forts: Fort Johnson (1814), Cantonment Davis (1815–1818), and Fort Edwards (1816–1824). First settlers participated in fur trade. Important trade and shipping center. Post...

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; set on a log. He says he has concluded to do right.286

In spite of this report, two days later Brigham Young wrote in a letter to Orson’s brother Parley P. Pratt: “Br Orson Pratt is in trubble in consequence of his wife, his feelings are so rought up that he dos not know whether his wife is wrong, or whether Josephs testmony and others are wrong and due Ly and he decived for 12 years, or not; he is all but crazy about matters.” (Brigham Young, Nauvoo, IL, to Parley P. Pratt, Liverpool, England, 17 July 1842, CHL.)  


16 July 1842 • Saturday

Saturday 16th. Rode out on prairie with W. C. William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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to show some land to Bro Russel287

Probably Daniel or Samuel Russell, who came with their families to Nauvoo around this time from Newstead Township, Erie County, which borders Genesee County, New York. (1840 U.S. Census, Newstead, Erie Co., NY, 378; “Record of the Names of the Members,” [30]; Hancock Co., IL, Deed Records, 27 July 1842, vol. L, pp. 119–120, microfilm 954,599, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  


from Genessee called at his farm and dined at bro Lots Cornelius Lott’s

27 Sept. 1798–6 July 1850. Farmer. Born in New York City. Son of Peter Lott and Mary Jane Smiley. Married Permelia Darrow, 27 Apr. 1823, in Bridgewater Township, Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Lived in Bridgewater Township, 1830. Baptized into LDS church,...

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. Afterwards went to hoeing potatoes.

17 July 1842 • Sunday

Sunday 17th. At the Grove

Before partial completion of Nauvoo temple, all large meetings were held outdoors in groves located near east and west sides of temple site. Had portable stands for speakers. JS referred to area as “temple stand” due to its location on brow of hill.

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, was sick. At home the remainder of the day.

18 July 1842 • Monday

Monday 18th. Rode out to bro Kearn’s Henry Kearns’s and to the Farm

JS purchased one hundred fifty-three acres for farm, 16 Sept. 1841, to be paid off over time. Located about three miles east of Nauvoo on south side of Old Road to Carthage. Farm managed by Cornelius P. Lott and wife, Permelia. JS frequently labored on farm...

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.—288

Kearns arrived in Nauvoo in early July and purchased a home and farm comprising the north half of the northwest quarter of Section 9—property bordering JS’s farm, on the Carthage road—on 14 July 1842. (Henry Kearns, Nauvoo, IL, to Leonard Pickel, Bart, PA, 7 Dec. 1842, Leonard Pickel, Mormon Letters, 1841–1844, Western Americana Collection, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, New Haven, CT; Trustees Land Book B, 14 July 1842, 13.)  


19 July 1842 • Tuesday

Tuesday 19th. Rode out with Dr Robert D. Foster

14 Mar. 1811–1 Feb. 1878. Physician, land speculator. Born in Braunston, Northamptonshire, England. Son of John Foster and Jane Knibb. Married Sarah Phinney, 18 July 1837, at Medina Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church, before Oct. 1839. Ordained an elder,...

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, Henry Kearns & others to look at Timber Land

22 July 1842 • Friday

Friday 22nd. A.M. At the stand conflicting with O. P. Orson Pratt

19 Sept. 1811–3 Oct. 1881. Farmer, writer, teacher, merchant, surveyor, editor, publisher. Born at Hartford, Washington Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Moved to New Lebanon, Columbia Co., New York, 1814; to Canaan, Columbia Co., fall...

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and correcting the public mind with regard to reports put in circulation by John C. Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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& others.289

The meeting was called “to obtain an expression of the public mind” with respect to the efforts of Bennett to defame JS’s character. Wilson Law presented a resolution upholding JS’s integrity and moral character. The vote by the citizens of Nauvoo, numbering “about a thousand men,” was nearly unanimous, but Pratt arose and spoke at length to explain his negative vote, whereupon JS publicly asked Pratt, “Have you personally a knowledge of any immoral act in me toward the female sex, or in any other way?” Pratt replied, “Personally, toward the female sex, I have not.”a This issue continued until Pratt was excommunicated on 20 August 1842 by the available members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. The same day, Amasa Lyman was ordained in Pratt’s stead as an apostle by Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, and George A. Smith.b In January 1843, Pratt “confessed his sins, and manifested deep repentance” and was rebaptized and reinstated as a member of the Twelve.c  


aMinutes, Times and Seasons, 1 Aug. 1842, 3:869.

bHistorian’s Office, Brigham Young History Drafts, 64; Woodruff, Journal, 10 Aug.–18 Sept. 1842.

cHistorian’s Office, Brigham Young History Drafts, 66–67; JS, Journal, 20 Jan. 1843.

In the P.M. a petition was prepared and singed signed by the citizens praying the Governor

18 July 1789–14 Feb. 1852. Ferry owner, farmer, sheriff, politician. Born in Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of Thomas Carlin and Elizabeth Evans. Baptist. Moved to Missouri, by 1803. Moved to Illinois, by 1812. Served in War of 1812. Married Rebecca Hewitt, 13...

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not to issue a writ for the Prest.290

Rumors published as early as 21 May 1842 charged JS with complicity in the attempt to assassinate Lilburn W. Boggs, former governor of Missouri.a Bennett made the same accusation in his 2 July letter, published in the 15 July Sangamo Journal.b In St. Louis, the 14 July 1842 issue of the Bulletin published another letter and affidavit from Bennett connecting JS and Orrin Porter Rockwell with the attempted assassination.c Soon after, on 20 July, Boggs made a sworn statement that JS “was accessary before the fact” in the assassination attempt and requested that JS be extradited to Missouri.d The petition of the Nauvoo citizens urged Illinois governor Thomas Carlin “not to issue a Writ for him [JS] to be given up to the Authorities of Missouri,” but to try him in Illinois if Carlin thought JS had broken the law. The petition was drawn up by a committee of the city council, consisting of John Taylor, William Law, and Brigham Young, who were assisted by recorder James Sloan. The petition was “signed by about eight hundred, or upwards” of the citizens of Nauvoo.e Carlin received the petition on 26 July but honored the request of governor Thomas Reynolds and issued a writ on 2 August for JS’s arrest.f  


a“Assassination of Ex-Governor Boggs of Missouri,” Quincy (IL) Whig, 21 May 1842, [3].

b“Further Mormon Developments!! 2d Letter from Gen. Bennett,” Sangamo Journal (Springfield, IL), 15 July 1842, [2].

cJohn C. Bennett, St. Louis, MO, 13 July 1842, Letter to the editor, Bulletin (St. Louis), 14 July 1842, [2].

dLilburn W. Boggs, Affidavit, 20 July 1842.

eNauvoo City Council Minute Book, 22 July 1842, 95–97.

fThomas Carlin to JS, 27 July 1842; Thomas Reynolds, Requisition, 22 July 1842; Thomas Carlin, Writ, 2 Aug. 1842, Ex Parte JS for Accessory to Boggs Assault [C.C.D. Ill. 1843], copy, Nauvoo, IL, Records, CHL; JS, Journal, 8 Aug. 1842.

24 July 1842 • Sunday

Sunday 24th. In the A.M. at home sick. In the P.M. at the Grove

Before partial completion of Nauvoo temple, all large meetings were held outdoors in groves located near east and west sides of temple site. Had portable stands for speakers. JS referred to area as “temple stand” due to its location on brow of hill.

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. Spoke concerning bro. George Miller

25 Nov. 1794–after July 1856. Carpenter, mill operator, lumber dealer, steamboat owner. Born near Stanardsville, Orange Co., Virginia. Son of John Miller and Margaret Pfeiffer. Moved to Augusta Co., Virginia, 1798; to Madison Co., Kentucky, 1806; to Boone...

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having returned with good news. That John C. Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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could do nothing &c.291

Miller and Erastus Derby left Nauvoo twelve days earlier to confer with governors Thomas Carlin of Illinois and Thomas Reynolds of Missouri about rumors concerning an attempt to extradite JS to Missouri. Miller and Derby were told that Bennett’s efforts would be ineffectual in reviving the Missouri charges against JS based on the 1838 Mormon War. However, following an affidavit sworn by Lilburn W. Boggs on 20 July implicating JS in the assassination attempt on his life, Reynolds, two days before Miller’s arrival in Nauvoo, issued a requisition to Carlin for JS’s arrest and extradition. (JS, Journal, 12 July 1842; George Miller, St. James, MI, to “Dear Brother,” 26 June 1855, Northern Islander, 16 Aug. 1855, [3]–[4]; Calvin A. Warren, Quincy, IL, to JS, Nauvoo, IL, 13 July 1842, JS Collection, CHL; Lilburn W. Boggs, Affidavit, 20 July 1842; Thomas Reynolds, Requisition, 22 July 1842.)  


26 July 1842 • Tuesday

Tuesday 26 Sick. Rode to the farm

JS purchased one hundred fifty-three acres for farm, 16 Sept. 1841, to be paid off over time. Located about three miles east of Nauvoo on south side of Old Road to Carthage. Farm managed by Cornelius P. Lott and wife, Permelia. JS frequently labored on farm...

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in the P.M.

27 July 1842 • Wednesday

Wednesday 27th. At the Grove

JS purchased one hundred fifty-three acres for farm, 16 Sept. 1841, to be paid off over time. Located about three miles east of Nauvoo on south side of Old Road to Carthage. Farm managed by Cornelius P. Lott and wife, Permelia. JS frequently labored on farm...

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, listening to the electioneering candidates. After they had got through spake some292

Nominations for the new county officers were made in Nauvoo two months earlier, and the election was held in August. (JS, Journal, 1 June 1842; “Public Meeting,” The Wasp, 4 June 1842, [3].)  


31 July 1842 • Sunday

Sunday 31st. In council with Bishops George Miller

25 Nov. 1794–after July 1856. Carpenter, mill operator, lumber dealer, steamboat owner. Born near Stanardsville, Orange Co., Virginia. Son of John Miller and Margaret Pfeiffer. Moved to Augusta Co., Virginia, 1798; to Madison Co., Kentucky, 1806; to Boone...

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& Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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, Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Jno Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

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&c concerning Bishop Knights Vinson Knight’s

14 Mar. 1804–31 July 1842. Farmer, druggist, school warden. Born at Norwich, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Rudolphus Knight and Rispah (Rizpah) Lee. Married Martha McBride, 14 Mar. 1826. Moved to Perrysburg, Cattaraugus Co., New York, by Mar. 1834....

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sickness. Bro Knight

14 Mar. 1804–31 July 1842. Farmer, druggist, school warden. Born at Norwich, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Rudolphus Knight and Rispah (Rizpah) Lee. Married Martha McBride, 14 Mar. 1826. Moved to Perrysburg, Cattaraugus Co., New York, by Mar. 1834....

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s has been sick about a week and this morning he began to sink very fast untill 12 o clock when death put a period to his sufferings.

3 August 1842 • Wednesday

August Wednesday 3rd. In the city transacting various business— and in company with General James Adams

24 Jan. 1783–11 Aug. 1843. Lawyer, judge, insurance agent, land speculator. Born at Simsbury, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of Parmenio Adams and Chloe. In New York militia, served as ensign, 1805; as lieutenant; as captain, 1807, and as major, 1811–1815...

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and others.

4 August 1842 • Thursday

Thursday 4th. In the city

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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learning sword exercise under Col. Brewer from St Louis

Located on west side of Mississippi River about fifteen miles south of confluence with Missouri River. Founded as fur-trading post by French settlers, 1764. Incorporated as town, 1809. First Mississippi steamboat docked by town, 1817. Incorporated as city...

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293

Joseph Smith III later recalled a “Colonel Brower,” who was one of the drill officers engaged. Brower had lost his lower left arm but “was an excellent horseman and a skillful swordsman and fencer.” (Mary Audentia Smith Anderson, “The Memoirs of President Joseph Smith,” Saints’ Herald, 1 Jan. 1935, 15.)  


and attending various other business. [p. 128]
a Mob upon us, and as Mr E. Kilbourn

22 Jan. 1814–3 Feb. 1878. Merchant, land speculator, gas manufacturer, railroad operator. Born at Marlborough, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of David Kilbourn(e) and Lydia Welles. Moved to Lee Co., Iowa Territory, by 1839. In partnership with his brother...

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was then present he would have the  privilege of either admitting or denying it. Question by E. Kilbourn

22 Jan. 1814–3 Feb. 1878. Merchant, land speculator, gas manufacturer, railroad operator. Born at Marlborough, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of David Kilbourn(e) and Lydia Welles. Moved to Lee Co., Iowa Territory, by 1839. In partnership with his brother...

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“Who did Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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 tell that I and my brother were conspiring to bring a mob upon you” Answer by  Joseph “He told me and he told [blank] Allred283

Probably William Moore Allred, who married Orissa Bates, sister of Sarah Bates Pratt, on 9 January 1842, with Mayor John C. Bennett officiating. (Allred, Reminiscences and Diary, 8–9.)  


and Orson Pratt

19 Sept. 1811–3 Oct. 1881. Farmer, writer, teacher, merchant, surveyor, editor, publisher. Born at Hartford, Washington Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Moved to New Lebanon, Columbia Co., New York, 1814; to Canaan, Columbia Co., fall...

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s wife & others”. Q by E Kilboun

22 Jan. 1814–3 Feb. 1878. Merchant, land speculator, gas manufacturer, railroad operator. Born at Marlborough, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of David Kilbourn(e) and Lydia Welles. Moved to Lee Co., Iowa Territory, by 1839. In partnership with his brother...

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 “Where did he say we were going to bring a mob from”. Ans. by Joseph. “From Galena

County seat. Originally known as the Point; laid out and named Galena, 1826. Principal town in lead-mine country. Received city charter, 1841. Population in 1840 about 1,800. Population in 1845 about 4,000. Several Saints worked in mines while Nauvoo temple...

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”.  Mr. Kilbourn

22 Jan. 1814–3 Feb. 1878. Merchant, land speculator, gas manufacturer, railroad operator. Born at Marlborough, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of David Kilbourn(e) and Lydia Welles. Moved to Lee Co., Iowa Territory, by 1839. In partnership with his brother...

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then arose and said, “I was conversing with my brother this morning and  he said he had never seen Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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since he had us before him last year for cons piracy.284

Sometime prior to 20 September 1841, David and Edward Kilbourne appeared before John C. Bennett in the mayor’s court on a charge of conspiring to unlawfully procure an indictment. The charge was based on a complaint by Lorenzo Wasson and Orrin Porter Rockwell after the Kilbournes attempted to catch a group of alleged thieves, including Rockwell, in the act of robbing the Kilbournes’ store in Montrose, Iowa Territory. According to the Kilbournes, the charge was “unsustained by a shadow of proof,” and they were discharged by Bennett at Nauvoo. (David Kilbourne and Edward Kilbourne, “Latter-Day-ism, No. 1,” Hawk-Eye and Iowa Patriot [Burlington, IA], 30 Sept. 1841, [1]; see also Bennett, History of the Saints, 93.)  


I have only seen him twice since last fall, I saw <him> once then. I was going  to Galena

County seat. Originally known as the Point; laid out and named Galena, 1826. Principal town in lead-mine country. Received city charter, 1841. Population in 1840 about 1,800. Population in 1845 about 4,000. Several Saints worked in mines while Nauvoo temple...

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about 2 weeks ago. The Boat I was on stopped at the upper Landing place and  I came ashore a little while. The first person I saw was Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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; we entered  into conversation, but there was no mention made of mobs. I have not seen  him since. I always regarded Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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the same as I regard you (Joseph) and  thought you were pretty well matched. If any one says that I have conspired to  bring a Mob upon you it is false”.285

The Kilbournes wrote three letters attacking the church and JS. On 14 May 1842, David Kilbourne wrote to Missouri governor Thomas Reynolds accusing JS of complicity in the Lilburn W. Boggs assassination attempt and urging his arrest. On 24 June, JS wrote to Illinois governor Thomas Carlin expressing concern about information from Galena, about 160 miles upriver from Nauvoo, that the Kilbournes and Bennett had posted handbills there asking for volunteers to drive out the Mormons and to assist in kidnapping JS. (David Kilbourne and Edward Kilbourne, “Latter-Day-ism, No. 1,” Hawk-Eye and Iowa Patriot [Burlington, IA], 30 Sept. 1841, [1]; David Kilbourne and Edward Kilbourne, “Latter- Day-ism, No. 2,” Hawk-Eye and Iowa Patriot [Burlington, IA], 7 Oct. 1841, [2]; David Kilbourne and Edward Kilbourne, “Latter Day-ism No. 3,” Hawk-Eye and Iowa Patriot [Burlington, IA], 14 Oct. 1841, [3]; David Kilbourne, Montrose, Iowa Territory, to Thomas Reynolds, Jefferson City, MO, 14 May 1842, Thomas Reynolds, Office of Governor, MSA; JS, Nauvoo, IL, to Thomas Carlin, [Quincy, IL], 24 June 1842, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 233–235.)  


The meeting was then peaceably dismissed.  O. P.

19 Sept. 1811–3 Oct. 1881. Farmer, writer, teacher, merchant, surveyor, editor, publisher. Born at Hartford, Washington Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Moved to New Lebanon, Columbia Co., New York, 1814; to Canaan, Columbia Co., fall...

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returned at night. He was seen about 2 miles this side Warsaw

Located at foot of Des Moines Rapids of Mississippi River at site of three military forts: Fort Johnson (1814), Cantonment Davis (1815–1818), and Fort Edwards (1816–1824). First settlers participated in fur trade. Important trade and shipping center. Post...

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; set on a  log. He says he has concluded to do right.286

In spite of this report, two days later Brigham Young wrote in a letter to Orson’s brother Parley P. Pratt: “Br Orson Pratt is in trubble in consequence of his wife, his feelings are so rought up that he dos not know whether his wife is wrong, or whether Josephs testmony and others are wrong and due Ly and he decived for 12 years, or not; he is all but crazy about matters.” (Brigham Young, Nauvoo, IL, to Parley P. Pratt, Liverpool, England, 17 July 1842, CHL.)  


16 July 1842 • Saturday

Saturday 16th. Rode out on prairie with W. C. [William Clayton]

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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to show some land to Bro Russel287

Probably Daniel or Samuel Russell, who came with their families to Nauvoo around this time from Newstead Township, Erie County, which borders Genesee County, New York. (1840 U.S. Census, Newstead, Erie Co., NY, 378; “Record of the Names of the Members,” [30]; Hancock Co., IL, Deed Records, 27 July 1842, vol. L, pp. 119–120, microfilm 954,599, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL.)  


from Genessee  called at his farm and dined at bro Lots [Cornelius Lott’s]

27 Sept. 1798–6 July 1850. Farmer. Born in New York City. Son of Peter Lott and Mary Jane Smiley. Married Permelia Darrow, 27 Apr. 1823, in Bridgewater Township, Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Lived in Bridgewater Township, 1830. Baptized into LDS church,...

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. Afterwards went to hoeing potatoes.

17 July 1842 • Sunday

Sunday 17th. At the Grove

Before partial completion of Nauvoo temple, all large meetings were held outdoors in groves located near east and west sides of temple site. Had portable stands for speakers. JS referred to area as “temple stand” due to its location on brow of hill.

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, was sick. At home the remainder of the day.

18 July 1842 • Monday

Monday 18th. Rode out to bro Kearn’s [Henry Kearns’s] and to the Farm

JS purchased one hundred fifty-three acres for farm, 16 Sept. 1841, to be paid off over time. Located about three miles east of Nauvoo on south side of Old Road to Carthage. Farm managed by Cornelius P. Lott and wife, Permelia. JS frequently labored on farm...

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.—288

Kearns arrived in Nauvoo in early July and purchased a home and farm comprising the north half of the northwest quarter of Section 9—property bordering JS’s farm, on the Carthage road—on 14 July 1842. (Henry Kearns, Nauvoo, IL, to Leonard Pickel, Bart, PA, 7 Dec. 1842, Leonard Pickel, Mormon Letters, 1841–1844, Western Americana Collection, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University, New Haven, CT; Trustees Land Book B, 14 July 1842, 13.)  


19 July 1842 • Tuesday

Tuesday 19th. Rode out with Dr [Robert D.] Foster

14 Mar. 1811–1 Feb. 1878. Physician, land speculator. Born in Braunston, Northamptonshire, England. Son of John Foster and Jane Knibb. Married Sarah Phinney, 18 July 1837, at Medina Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church, before Oct. 1839. Ordained an elder,...

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, Henry Kearns & others to look at Timber Land

22 July 1842 • Friday

Thrsday <Friday> 20th. <22nd.> P.M. <A.M.> At the stand conflicting with O. P. [Orson Pratt]

19 Sept. 1811–3 Oct. 1881. Farmer, writer, teacher, merchant, surveyor, editor, publisher. Born at Hartford, Washington Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Moved to New Lebanon, Columbia Co., New York, 1814; to Canaan, Columbia Co., fall...

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and correcting the public mind  with regard to reports put in circulation by [John C.] Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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& others.289

The meeting was called “to obtain an expression of the public mind” with respect to the efforts of Bennett to defame JS’s character. Wilson Law presented a resolution upholding JS’s integrity and moral character. The vote by the citizens of Nauvoo, numbering “about a thousand men,” was nearly unanimous, but Pratt arose and spoke at length to explain his negative vote, whereupon JS publicly asked Pratt, “Have you personally a knowledge of any immoral act in me toward the female sex, or in any other way?” Pratt replied, “Personally, toward the female sex, I have not.”a This issue continued until Pratt was excommunicated on 20 August 1842 by the available members of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. The same day, Amasa Lyman was ordained in Pratt’s stead as an apostle by Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, and George A. Smith.b In January 1843, Pratt “confessed his sins, and manifested deep repentance” and was rebaptized and reinstated as a member of the Twelve.c  


aMinutes, Times and Seasons, 1 Aug. 1842, 3:869.

bHistorian’s Office, Brigham Young History Drafts, 64; Woodruff, Journal, 10 Aug.–18 Sept. 1842.

cHistorian’s Office, Brigham Young History Drafts, 66–67; JS, Journal, 20 Jan. 1843.

In the P.M. a  petition was prepared and singed [signed] by the citizens praying the Governor

18 July 1789–14 Feb. 1852. Ferry owner, farmer, sheriff, politician. Born in Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of Thomas Carlin and Elizabeth Evans. Baptist. Moved to Missouri, by 1803. Moved to Illinois, by 1812. Served in War of 1812. Married Rebecca Hewitt, 13...

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not to  issue a writ for the Prest.290

Rumors published as early as 21 May 1842 charged JS with complicity in the attempt to assassinate Lilburn W. Boggs, former governor of Missouri.a Bennett made the same accusation in his 2 July letter, published in the 15 July Sangamo Journal.b In St. Louis, the 14 July 1842 issue of the Bulletin published another letter and affidavit from Bennett connecting JS and Orrin Porter Rockwell with the attempted assassination.c Soon after, on 20 July, Boggs made a sworn statement that JS “was accessary before the fact” in the assassination attempt and requested that JS be extradited to Missouri.d The petition of the Nauvoo citizens urged Illinois governor Thomas Carlin “not to issue a Writ for him [JS] to be given up to the Authorities of Missouri,” but to try him in Illinois if Carlin thought JS had broken the law. The petition was drawn up by a committee of the city council, consisting of John Taylor, William Law, and Brigham Young, who were assisted by recorder James Sloan. The petition was “signed by about eight hundred, or upwards” of the citizens of Nauvoo.e Carlin received the petition on 26 July but honored the request of governor Thomas Reynolds and issued a writ on 2 August for JS’s arrest.f  


a“Assassination of Ex-Governor Boggs of Missouri,” Quincy (IL) Whig, 21 May 1842, [3].

b“Further Mormon Developments!! 2d Letter from Gen. Bennett,” Sangamo Journal (Springfield, IL), 15 July 1842, [2].

cJohn C. Bennett, St. Louis, MO, 13 July 1842, Letter to the editor, Bulletin (St. Louis), 14 July 1842, [2].

dLilburn W. Boggs, Affidavit, 20 July 1842.

eNauvoo City Council Minute Book, 22 July 1842, 95–97.

fThomas Carlin to JS, 27 July 1842; Thomas Reynolds, Requisition, 22 July 1842; Thomas Carlin, Writ, 2 Aug. 1842, Ex Parte JS for Accessory to Boggs Assault [C.C.D. Ill. 1843], copy, Nauvoo, IL, Records, CHL; JS, Journal, 8 Aug. 1842.

24 July 1842 • Sunday

Sunday 24th. In the A.M. at home sick. In the P.M. at the Grove

Before partial completion of Nauvoo temple, all large meetings were held outdoors in groves located near east and west sides of temple site. Had portable stands for speakers. JS referred to area as “temple stand” due to its location on brow of hill.

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. Spoke concerning bro.  [George] Miller

25 Nov. 1794–after July 1856. Carpenter, mill operator, lumber dealer, steamboat owner. Born near Stanardsville, Orange Co., Virginia. Son of John Miller and Margaret Pfeiffer. Moved to Augusta Co., Virginia, 1798; to Madison Co., Kentucky, 1806; to Boone...

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having returned with good news. That [John C.] Bennett

3 Aug. 1804–5 Aug. 1867. Physician, minister, poultry breeder. Born at Fairhaven, Bristol Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Bennett and Abigail Cook. Moved to Marietta, Washington Co., Ohio, 1808; to Massachusetts, 1812; and back to Marietta, 1822. Married ...

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could do nothing &c.291

Miller and Erastus Derby left Nauvoo twelve days earlier to confer with governors Thomas Carlin of Illinois and Thomas Reynolds of Missouri about rumors concerning an attempt to extradite JS to Missouri. Miller and Derby were told that Bennett’s efforts would be ineffectual in reviving the Missouri charges against JS based on the 1838 Mormon War. However, following an affidavit sworn by Lilburn W. Boggs on 20 July implicating JS in the assassination attempt on his life, Reynolds, two days before Miller’s arrival in Nauvoo, issued a requisition to Carlin for JS’s arrest and extradition. (JS, Journal, 12 July 1842; George Miller, St. James, MI, to “Dear Brother,” 26 June 1855, Northern Islander, 16 Aug. 1855, [3]–[4]; Calvin A. Warren, Quincy, IL, to JS, Nauvoo, IL, 13 July 1842, JS Collection, CHL; Lilburn W. Boggs, Affidavit, 20 July 1842; Thomas Reynolds, Requisition, 22 July 1842.)  


26 July 1842 • Tuesday

Tuesday 26 Sick. Rode to the farm

JS purchased one hundred fifty-three acres for farm, 16 Sept. 1841, to be paid off over time. Located about three miles east of Nauvoo on south side of Old Road to Carthage. Farm managed by Cornelius P. Lott and wife, Permelia. JS frequently labored on farm...

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in the P.M.

27 July 1842 • Wednesday

Wednesday 27th. At the Grove

JS purchased one hundred fifty-three acres for farm, 16 Sept. 1841, to be paid off over time. Located about three miles east of Nauvoo on south side of Old Road to Carthage. Farm managed by Cornelius P. Lott and wife, Permelia. JS frequently labored on farm...

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, listening to the electioneering candidates. After they had got through  spake some292

Nominations for the new county officers were made in Nauvoo two months earlier, and the election was held in August. (JS, Journal, 1 June 1842; “Public Meeting,” The Wasp, 4 June 1842, [3].)  


31 July 1842 • Sunday

Sunday 31st. In council with Bishops [George] Miller

25 Nov. 1794–after July 1856. Carpenter, mill operator, lumber dealer, steamboat owner. Born near Stanardsville, Orange Co., Virginia. Son of John Miller and Margaret Pfeiffer. Moved to Augusta Co., Virginia, 1798; to Madison Co., Kentucky, 1806; to Boone...

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& [Newel K.] Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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, B[righam] Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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, Jno Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

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&c concerning Bishop  Knights [Vinson Knight’s]

14 Mar. 1804–31 July 1842. Farmer, druggist, school warden. Born at Norwich, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Rudolphus Knight and Rispah (Rizpah) Lee. Married Martha McBride, 14 Mar. 1826. Moved to Perrysburg, Cattaraugus Co., New York, by Mar. 1834....

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sickness. Bro Knight

14 Mar. 1804–31 July 1842. Farmer, druggist, school warden. Born at Norwich, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Rudolphus Knight and Rispah (Rizpah) Lee. Married Martha McBride, 14 Mar. 1826. Moved to Perrysburg, Cattaraugus Co., New York, by Mar. 1834....

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s has been sick about a week and this morning  he began to sink very fast untill 12 o clock when death put a period to  his sufferings.

3 August 1842 • Wednesday

August Wednesday 3rd. In the city transacting various business— and in company with General [James] Adams

24 Jan. 1783–11 Aug. 1843. Lawyer, judge, insurance agent, land speculator. Born at Simsbury, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of Parmenio Adams and Chloe. In New York militia, served as ensign, 1805; as lieutenant; as captain, 1807, and as major, 1811–1815...

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 and others.

4 August 1842 • Thursday

Thursday 4th. In the city

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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learning sword exercise under Col. Brewer from St Louis

Located on west side of Mississippi River about fifteen miles south of confluence with Missouri River. Founded as fur-trading post by French settlers, 1764. Incorporated as town, 1809. First Mississippi steamboat docked by town, 1817. Incorporated as city...

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293

Joseph Smith III later recalled a “Colonel Brower,” who was one of the drill officers engaged. Brower had lost his lower left arm but “was an excellent horseman and a skillful swordsman and fencer.” (Mary Audentia Smith Anderson, “The Memoirs of President Joseph Smith,” Saints’ Herald, 1 Jan. 1935, 15.)  


 and attending various other business. [p. 128]
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JS, Journal, Dec. 1841–Dec. 1842; handwriting of William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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, Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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, Eliza R. Snow

21 Jan. 1804–5 Dec. 1887. Poet, teacher, seamstress, milliner. Born in Becket, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Oliver Snow and Rosetta Leonora Pettibone. Moved to Mantua, Trumbull Co., Ohio, ca. 1806. Member of Baptist church. Baptized into LDS ...

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, and Erastus Derby

14 Sept. 1810–3 Dec. 1890. Tailor, carpenter, farmer, joiner. Born in Hawley, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Edward Darby and Ruth Phoebe Hitchcock. Moved to Ohio, by 1834. Married Ruhamah Burnham Knowlton, 10 Aug. 1834, in Carthage, Hamilton Co., Ohio...

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; signatures of William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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and Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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; 90 pages; in “The Book of the Law of the Lord,” Record Book, 1841–1845, CHL. Includes shorthand; also includes redactions and use marks.
JS’s journal for December 1841–December 1842 was inscribed in a large, leather-bound blank book made with thick paper. The paper bears a star-shaped watermark in the middle of each leaf and was printed with forty-seven blue lines on each side. The text block was originally formed with thirty gatherings of eight leaves each. The second gathering, however, has only six leaves. This six-leaf gathering was either a binding error or one sheet came loose from the binding before the book was inscribed (the book’s inscription and pagination runs through this gathering without skipping any text or page numbers). The gatherings were sewn all along. Each set of front and back endpapers consisted of a gathering of four leaves of unlined paper, but only two leaves are now extant in the back gathering. The trimmed pages measure 16¼ × 10½ inches (41 × 27 cm). Headbands were sewn onto the text block. The exterior pages of the endpapers are joined to the pasteboards with a strip of pink cloth. Marbled papers featuring a shell pattern with green body and veins of red and yellow are glued to the inside covers of the boards and to the exterior page of each gathering of endpapers. The leaf edges are stained green. The text block is bound in a ledger style to the boards. The spine was constructed with four false raised bands demarcating five panels. The boards and spine are covered in suede leather with additional leather strips over the top and bottom of the book. The suede leather was blind tooled on the outside covers, the raised bands of the spine, and the turned-in edges on the inside cover. The additional leather strips, which also cover the first and fifth panels of the spine, are embossed with dual lines and vegetal designs along the borders and have gold line filling. The spine is further embossed with the number “6” in 20-point type on the fifth panel. The second and fourth panels have black-painted squares of paper glued to them. These feature gold lining and decoration at the top and bottom. The completed volume measures 17 × 11 × 2¼ inches (43 × 28 × 6 cm) and includes 244 free leaves. A penciled inscription at the inside top corner of page [ii]—the verso of the front marbled flyleaf—gives what appears to be an expensive price for this high-quality blank book: “bth | 10.00”.
Robert B. Thompson

1 Oct. 1811–27 Aug. 1841. Clerk, editor. Born in Great Driffield, Yorkshire, England. Member of Methodist church. Immigrated to Upper Canada, 1834. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt, May 1836, in Upper Canada. Ordained an elder by John Taylor, 22...

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inscribed nine revelations in the book on the first twenty-three pages of lined paper. Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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made minor revisions to these revelation texts. Apparently either Richards or Thompson inscribed page numbers on pages 3­–18, beginning at the first page of lined paper, in a stylized script. Richards inscribed page numbers on pages 19–25 as well as on the next several dozen pages—which included journal entries for JS and records of donations in cash and in kind for the construction of the Nauvoo temple

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

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. At some point page [1], the recto of the last leaf of unlined endpaper in the front of the book, was inscribed with a title: “THE | BOOK | of the | LAW | of the | LORD”. Because these words are hand lettered in various ornate styles, the handwriting cannot be identified. A matching title appears on the spine of the volume: the square label of black paper on the second panel of the spine bears a smaller square label of white paper with a hand-lettered inscription: “LAW | — of the — | LORD.” Willard Richards inscribed pages 26–126 of the book, with help from William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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on pages 27–28 and 72–87. Clayton inscribed the rest of the volume, pages 127–477, with help from Erastus Derby

14 Sept. 1810–3 Dec. 1890. Tailor, carpenter, farmer, joiner. Born in Hawley, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Edward Darby and Ruth Phoebe Hitchcock. Moved to Ohio, by 1834. Married Ruhamah Burnham Knowlton, 10 Aug. 1834, in Carthage, Hamilton Co., Ohio...

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on pages 168–171 and from Eliza R. Snow

21 Jan. 1804–5 Dec. 1887. Poet, teacher, seamstress, milliner. Born in Becket, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Daughter of Oliver Snow and Rosetta Leonora Pettibone. Moved to Mantua, Trumbull Co., Ohio, ca. 1806. Member of Baptist church. Baptized into LDS ...

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on pages 189–190 and 192–201. These clerks and scribes generally paginated the book and inscribed dateline page headers along the way as they inscribed its texts.1

The page numbers on pages 19–71, 86–90, and 122–125 are in the handwriting of Willard Richards; on pages 72–85, 91–121, 126–167, and 171–477, in the handwriting of William Clayton; and on pages 168–170, in the handwriting of Erastus Derby. There are two pages numbered 453. Pages 476–477 constitute the last leaf of lined paper. The headers generally consist of a year or a month and year. The headers inscribed on pages 26–27, 29–71, 88–95, 119, and 121–126 are in the handwriting of Richards; the headers inscribed on pages 28, 72–87, 96–118, 120, 127–167, and 172–215 are in the handwriting of Clayton; pages 168–171, which were inscribed by Derby, have no headers. A few other pages are missing headers.  


The donation records constitute the bulk of the volume. The journal entries are inscribed on pages 26, 31, 33, 36, 39, 43, 44, 48, 56–61, 66–67, 88–95, 122–135, and 164–215. As is also the case with the pages bearing donation records, many of the pages bearing journal entries have vertical margin lines inscribed in graphite. The journal entries themselves are inscribed in ink that is now brown. Pages 165–181, however, either include or are entirely in blue ink. Some of the entries begin with a descriptive heading as well as a dateline. The entry for 6 January 1842, for example, features the large heading “The New Year”. Page 58 features the large double underlined heading “Journal of President Joseph”. Many of the entries are divided by horizontal lines. Where groups of journal entries span several pages, notes written at the beginning and end of these spans reference the previous or succeeding pages of journal entries.2

For example, page 135 points the reader to page 164, which begins by noting the continuation from page 135.  


At various stages in the production of the volume, Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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and Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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signed their names to their work (pages 126, 181, 215).
The volume contains a number of redactions that were made as the journal entries were later revised for inclusion in the “History of Joseph Smith” published in Mormon newspapers in the mid-nineteenth century.3

This serialized history drew on the journals herein, beginning with the 4 July 1855 issue of the Deseret News and with the 3 January 1857 issue of the LDS Millennial Star.  


Most of these redactions, made in graphite, were subsequently erased.4

Most of these now-erased graphite inscriptions are recoverable with bright white light and magnification. Pages 209–215, which were not erased, represent the state of the journal entries generally when they were used for drafting the “History of Joseph Smith.”  


The upper left-hand corner of page 3 bears the graphite inscription “6”, a redactive note on page 43 is inscribed in purple pencil, and red-penciled “X”s appear in the margins next to entries on pages 164 and 180. Notes written on three white and three blue slips of paper of various sizes have been inserted in various places, as well as a clipped portion of a Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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-era elder’s certificate form with no notes (apparently just a placeholder). There are also two leaves of pink paper just inside the front of the volume. All of these slips and leaves of paper are loose and appear to have been added to the book subsequent to its use as a journal.
The book is intricately related to its successor volume, the 1844–1846 donation record, and to a volume that indexed the donation records.5

Tithing and Donation Record, 1844–1846, CHL; Trustee-in-trust, Index and Accounts, 1841–1847, CHL.  


The “Law of the Lord” is listed as such in inventories of church records made in Salt Lake City, Utah, in the 1850s. These show that the volume was held for a time in the office of church president Brigham Young.6

Historian’s Office, “Inventory. Historian’s Office. 4th April 1855,” [1]; Historian’s Office, “Inventory. Historians Office. G. S. L. City April 1.1857,” [1]; Historian’s Office, “Historian’s Office Inventory G. S. L. City March 19. 1858,” [1]; Historian’s Office, “Historian’s Office Catalogue Book March 1858,” [11], Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL.  


In 1880, John Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

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, president of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, carried the book to a stake Relief Society conference in Salt Lake City.7

Emmeline B. Wells, “Salt Lake Stake Relief Society Conference,” Women’s Exponent, 1 July 1880, 9:22.  


At some point the book was marked on the spine with an archival sticker, which was later removed. The book eventually was housed with the papers of Joseph Fielding Smith, apparently during his tenure as church historian and recorder (1921–1970), and then became part of the First Presidency’s papers when he became church president in 1970.8

“Inventory of President Joseph Fielding Smith’s Safe,” 23 May 1970, First Presidency, General Administration Files, CHL.  


In 2010, the First Presidency gave custody of the book to the Church History Library.9

Letter of transfer, Salt Lake City, UT, 8 Jan. 2010, CHL.  


This evidence indicates continuous institutional custody and authenticity.

Facts