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Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 1, 21 December 1842–10 March 1843

Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 1, 21 December 1842–10 March 1843

26 December 1842 • Monday

26— Held court. Sis Sylvia Butterfield Morey defndat defendant.17

According to the court record, the defendant was Sylvia Morey’s husband, George Morey. In October 1842 George Morey contracted with John Canfield to have Canfield drive Morey’s span of horses and wagon for the winter season, and longer if they could agree. Canfield was also to provide firewood for Morey’s family. In return, Canfield would receive “half of what [he] made and room rent free.” For unknown reasons Morey later left Nauvoo, after which Sylvia Morey, according to Canfield, took the team away from Canfield, refused to acknowledge the contract, and slandered Canfield in town. On 19 December 1842 Canfield commenced a suit before JS for “Work & labour, & Goods Sold & delivered, or furnished” by Canfield to Morey. With Morey being “absent from home, & it not appearing that he had absented himself to evade service of process,” JS dismissed the case at the plaintiff’s cost on 26 December. (John Canfield, Statement, 19 Dec. 1842, Nauvoo, IL, Records, CHL; Canfield v. Morey [Nauvoo Mayor’s Ct. 1843], Nauvoo Mayor’s Court Docket Book, 43.)  


had consultation with Gen Wilson W. Law

26 Feb. 1806–15 Oct. 1876. Merchant, millwright, land speculator, farmer. Born in Ireland. Son of Richard Law and Ann Hunter. Immigrated to U.S. and settled in Springfield Township, Mercer Co., Pennsylvania, by 1820. Moved to Delaware Township, Mercer Co....

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& was arrested by him on Proclomation of Gov. Thomas Carlin

18 July 1789–14 Feb. 1852. Ferry owner, farmer, sheriff, politician. Born in Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of Thomas Carlin and Elizabeth Evans. Baptist. Moved to Missouri, by 1803. Moved to Illinois, by 1812. Served in War of 1812. Married Rebecca Hewitt, 13...

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, & Elders Henry G. Sherwood

20 Apr. 1785–24 Nov. 1867. Surveyor. Born at Kingsbury, Washington Co., New York. Son of Newcomb Sherwood and a woman whose maiden name was Tolman (first name unidentified). Married first Jane J. McManagal (McMangle) of Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland, ca. 1824...

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& William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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startd for carthage

Located eighteen miles southeast of Nauvoo. Settled 1831. Designated Hancock Co. seat, Mar. 1833. Incorporated as town, 27 Feb. 1837. Population in 1839 about 300. Population in 1844 about 400. Site of anti-Mormon meetings and resolutions, early 1840s. Site...

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after Habeus Corpus to carry him to Springfield

Settled by 1819. Incorporated as town, 1832. Became state capital, 1837. Incorporated as city, 1840. Sangamon Co. seat. Population in 1840 about 2,600. Stake of LDS church organized in Springfield, Nov. 1840; discontinued May 1841; branch organized, Jan. ...

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18

Illinois Supreme Court judge Stephen A. Douglas advised that JS’s friends arrest JS on the authority of Carlin’s proclamation and bring him to Springfield for a hearing on a writ of habeas corpus. Governor Thomas Ford and United States attorney for Illinois Justin Butterfield also suggested, in letters dated 17 December 1842, that JS come to Springfield. Although Clayton and Sherwood were unable to obtain a writ of habeas corpus in Carthage because of the absence of a clerk, federal judge Nathaniel Pope granted one in Springfield two weeks later, on 31 December. (Clayton, Journal, 16 Dec. 1842; Thomas Carlin, Proclamation, 20 Sept. 1842; Thomas Ford to JS, 17 Dec. 1842; Justin Butterfield to JS, 17 Dec. 1842; Clayton, Journal, 26 and 27 Dec. 1842; JS, Journal, 31 Dec. 1842.)  


visited Sister Morey in custody of Secy. & prescribed for her afflictions. spoke very highly of Lobelia—19

The wild plant lobelia was used by botanic or Thomsonian physicians for its emetic properties. (Haller, People’s Doctors, 80.)  


good in its place. was one of the works of God. but Like the power of God or any good it become an evil when improperly used. had learned the use & value by his own expirence Home. Sister Emma

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

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sick had another chill— had a consultation concerning her20

Numerous journal entries indicate that Emma had been seriously ill since 30 September 1842. JS consulted with secretary Willard Richards about Emma’s health since Richards was an experienced botanic physician.  


with Secretary.— while walking up [p. 4]

26 December 1842 • Monday

26— Held court. Sis [Sylvia Butterfield] Morey defndat [defendant][.]17

According to the court record, the defendant was Sylvia Morey’s husband, George Morey. In October 1842 George Morey contracted with John Canfield to have Canfield drive Morey’s span of horses and wagon for the winter season, and longer if they could agree. Canfield was also to provide firewood for Morey’s family. In return, Canfield would receive “half of what [he] made and room rent free.” For unknown reasons Morey later left Nauvoo, after which Sylvia Morey, according to Canfield, took the team away from Canfield, refused to acknowledge the contract, and slandered Canfield in town. On 19 December 1842 Canfield commenced a suit before JS for “Work & labour, & Goods Sold & delivered, or furnished” by Canfield to Morey. With Morey being “absent from home, & it not appearing that he had absented himself to evade service of process,” JS dismissed the case at the plaintiff’s cost on 26 December. (John Canfield, Statement, 19 Dec. 1842, Nauvoo, IL, Records, CHL; Canfield v. Morey [Nauvoo Mayor’s Ct. 1843], Nauvoo Mayor’s Court Docket Book, 43.)  


 had consultation with Gen W[ilson] W. Law

26 Feb. 1806–15 Oct. 1876. Merchant, millwright, land speculator, farmer. Born in Ireland. Son of Richard Law and Ann Hunter. Immigrated to U.S. and settled in Springfield Township, Mercer Co., Pennsylvania, by 1820. Moved to Delaware Township, Mercer Co....

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 & was arrested by him on Proclomation  of Gov. [Thomas] Carlin

18 July 1789–14 Feb. 1852. Ferry owner, farmer, sheriff, politician. Born in Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of Thomas Carlin and Elizabeth Evans. Baptist. Moved to Missouri, by 1803. Moved to Illinois, by 1812. Served in War of 1812. Married Rebecca Hewitt, 13...

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, & Elders [Henry G.] Sherwood

20 Apr. 1785–24 Nov. 1867. Surveyor. Born at Kingsbury, Washington Co., New York. Son of Newcomb Sherwood and a woman whose maiden name was Tolman (first name unidentified). Married first Jane J. McManagal (McMangle) of Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland, ca. 1824...

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&  [William] Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

View Full Bio
startd for carthage

Located eighteen miles southeast of Nauvoo. Settled 1831. Designated Hancock Co. seat, Mar. 1833. Incorporated as town, 27 Feb. 1837. Population in 1839 about 300. Population in 1844 about 400. Site of anti-Mormon meetings and resolutions, early 1840s. Site...

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after  Habeus Corpus to carry him to  Spri[n]gfield

Settled by 1819. Incorporated as town, 1832. Became state capital, 1837. Incorporated as city, 1840. Sangamon Co. seat. Population in 1840 about 2,600. Stake of LDS church organized in Springfield, Nov. 1840; discontinued May 1841; branch organized, Jan. ...

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18

Illinois Supreme Court judge Stephen A. Douglas advised that JS’s friends arrest JS on the authority of Carlin’s proclamation and bring him to Springfield for a hearing on a writ of habeas corpus. Governor Thomas Ford and United States attorney for Illinois Justin Butterfield also suggested, in letters dated 17 December 1842, that JS come to Springfield. Although Clayton and Sherwood were unable to obtain a writ of habeas corpus in Carthage because of the absence of a clerk, federal judge Nathaniel Pope granted one in Springfield two weeks later, on 31 December. (Clayton, Journal, 16 Dec. 1842; Thomas Carlin, Proclamation, 20 Sept. 1842; Thomas Ford to JS, 17 Dec. 1842; Justin Butterfield to JS, 17 Dec. 1842; Clayton, Journal, 26 and 27 Dec. 1842; JS, Journal, 31 Dec. 1842.)  


visited Sister Morey in  custody of Secy. & prescribed for  her afflictions. spoke very highly  of Lobelia—19

The wild plant lobelia was used by botanic or Thomsonian physicians for its emetic properties. (Haller, People’s Doctors, 80.)  


good in its place. was one  of the works of God. but Like the  power of God or any good it become  an evil when improperly used. had  lear[n]ed the use & value by his own expirence  Home. Sister Emma

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

View Full Bio
sick had another  chill— had a consultation concerni[n]g her20

Numerous journal entries indicate that Emma had been seriously ill since 30 September 1842. JS consulted with secretary Willard Richards about Emma’s health since Richards was an experienced botanic physician.  


 with Secreta[r]y.—21

TEXT: The ink color changes at this point from blue to brown.  


while walking up [p. 4]
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JS, “President Joseph Smith’s Journal,” Journal, 4 vols., Dec. 1842–June 1844; handwriting and signatures of Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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; 1,045 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes shorthand and illustrations; also includes redactions, use marks, and archival stickers.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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kept “President Joseph Smith’s Journal” in four small memorandum books. The paper in book 1 is blue, while the paper in books 2–4 is white. In the first two books, the paper was printed with seventeen blue lines and extra space for page headers, whereas the paper for book 3 was printed with nineteen blue lines and no header space. The first eight gatherings of paper for book 4 were printed with sixteen blue lines and header space, while the last nine gatherings were printed with nineteen blue lines and no header space. The four volumes have 147, 160, 142, and 190 free leaves, respectively, and were sewn with all-along sewing. The leaves in books 1–3 were trimmed to measure 6 × 3¾ inches (15 × 10 cm), while the paper in book 4 measures 6¼ × 3¾ inches (16 × 10 cm). Books 2–4 have the same red-speckled stain on the page edges. All four books were bound with a tight-back case binding and have brown leather over pasteboards. Books 1–3 measure 6¼ × 4 × ¾ inches (16 × 10 × 2 cm); book 4 measures 6⅜ × 4 × ¾ inches (16 × 10 × 2 cm). The outside covers of book 1 feature an embossed pattern around the borders. The cover of book 4 is red and features a gold pattern around the borders on the front and the back.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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inscribed most of the journal entries in these memorandum books with a quill pen in ink that is now brown, although he also used blue ink for several entries. Some of the graphite inscriptions in the volumes are also contemporaneous. Richards paginated the first 114 of the 285 inscribed pages in book 1—discounting the title page that precedes the pagination—and the first 20 of the 309 inscribed pages in book 2. There is no pagination in books 3–4. In book 2, pages 11, 17, and 20–21 feature illustrations of celestial observations.
The Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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memorandum books include later inscriptions that are not transcribed in this edition. At the end of book 2, Thomas Bullock added a list of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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-era plural marriages. A few revisions, additions, or notes are penciled in throughout the volumes. There are also several use marks throughout the volumes—probably made when the journal entries were later revised for inclusion in the “History of Joseph Smith” published in Mormon newspapers in the mid-nineteenth century.1

This serialized history drew on the journals beginning with the 4 July 1855 issue of the Deseret News and with the 3 January 1857 issue of the LDS Millennial Star.  


The spines of the volumes are now labeled with blue-colored paper stickers that probably date from the early Utah period.2

The labels on the spines of the four volumes read respectively as follows: “Joseph Smith’s Journal—1842–3 by Willard Richards” (book 1); “Joseph Smith’s Journal by W. Richards 1843” (book 2); “Joseph Smith’s Journal by W. Richards 1843–4” (book 3); and “W. Richards’ Journal 1844 <Vol. 4>” (book 4; Richards kept JS’s journal in the front of this volume, and after JS’s death Richards kept his own journal in the back of the volume).  


Each of the four volumes also bears the mark of a square sticker removed from the upper right-hand corner of the outside front cover. Finally, a “Historian’s Office Archives” self-adhesive paper sticker appears in the front inside cover or on the first flyleaf of each book.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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identified himself as the scribe for the journal on the title pages of books 1 and 4. Because Richards kept the journals for JS and kept his own journal in the back of book 4 after JS’s death, the books may be included in the listing of “Drs private books & Papers”3

“Drs” in the quotation is a reference to Richards, a Thomsonian doctor. (“History of Willard Richards,” Deseret News, 23 June 1858, 73)  


in the inventory of church records made in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, in 1846.4

“Schedule of Church Records,” Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL.  


The volumes are listed in inventories made in Salt Lake City, Utah, by the Church Historian’s Office in 1855, 1858, and 1878, as well as in the 1973 register of the JS Collection.5

“Inventory. Historian’s Office. 4th April 1855,” [1]; “Contents of the Historian and Recorder’s Office G. S. L. City July 1858,” 2; “Index of Records and Journals in the Historian’s Office 1878,” [11]–[12], Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


These archival records and the physical evidence of archival stickers indicate continuous institutional custody and authenticity.
Note: The journal Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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kept for JS is divided into four physical books. The transcript and annotation here are for the first of these books, covering 21 December 1842 through 10 March 1843. The transcript and annotation for the first part of book 2, covering 10 March through 30 April 1843, are also available on this website. The transcript and annotation for the remainder of book 2 and for books 3 and 4 will be published later.

Facts