53992206

Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 1, 21 December 1842–10 March 1843

Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 1, 21 December 1842–10 March 1843

15 February 1843 • Wednesday

Wednesday Feb 15. 1843 helped change the top plate of the office stove— after reading in the Alton

City and river port, situated on east bank of Mississippi River. Incorporated as city, 1837. Population in 1840 about 2,300. Two hundred Saints, some from Liverpool, England, detained in Alton, winter 1842–1843; Saints later departed Alton aboard steamer ...

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paper about the Libellous letter written to Mr Bassett

Ca. 1814–12 June 1876. Teamster, farmer, miner. Born in Vermont. Son of Samuel Bassett and Anna Harmon. Lived in Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1824. Lived on Isaac Morley’s communal farm, by 1831. Baptized into LDS church and likely ordained an elder, by Jan. 1831...

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of Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

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about Judge Nathaniel Pope

5 Jan. 1784–22 Jan. 1850. Lawyer, judge. Born at present-day Louisville, Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of William Pope and Penelope Edwards. Graduated from Transylvania University, 1806, at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Moved to St. Genevieve, St. Genevieve...

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. Justin Butterfield

1790–Oct. 1855. Teacher, lawyer. Born in Keene, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Ca. 1810, moved to Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York, where he taught school and studied law. Admitted to bar, 1812, at Watertown. Practiced law in Adams, Jefferson Co., and Sackets...

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& the Ladies attending the trial at Springfield

Settled by 1819. Incorporated as town, 1832. Became state capital, 1837. Incorporated as city, 1840. Sangamon Co. seat. Population in 1840 about 2,600. Stake of LDS church organized in Springfield, Nov. 1840; discontinued May 1841; branch organized, Jan. ...

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399

Published in the 18 January issue of the Quincy Herald, the “Libellous letter” was actually addressed to John H. Pettit, editor of that newspaper. The letter deplored JS’s discharge from arrest on a writ of habeas corpus in Springfield earlier that month, charged Judge Nathaniel Pope and United States district attorney Justin Butterfield with failing to fulfill their official duties, and called into question the virtue of the ladies who had attended the hearing. While the editor of the Alton Telegraph condemned the letter as libelous, he expressed continuing contempt for JS. (“Joseph Smith the Mormon Prophet,” Quincy [IL] Herald, 18 Jan. 1843, [2]; “The Calumniators Detected,” Alton [IL] Telegraph and Democratic Review, 11 Feb. 1843, [2] ; Notice, Alton [IL] Telegraph and Democratic Review, 18 Feb. 1843, [3] ; “The Quincy Herald, Judge Pope, the Discharge of Joe Smith,” Alton [IL] Telegraph and Democratic Review, 28 Jan. 1843, [2].)  


about 1 o clock started for Skokokon

Located on east bank of Mississippi River, about twenty-five miles upriver from Nauvoo. Laid out by Robert McQueen, 1836. Location for landing rafts of lumber cut in Wisconsin Territory forests. Population never exceeded 300. JS visited area, Feb.–May 1843...

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with John Cowan

25 Apr. 1781–7 Nov. 1853. Farmer. Born near Harpers Ferry, Berkeley Co., Virginia (later in West Virginia). Son of James Cowan Sr. and Mary Russell. Moved near Lebanon, Hamilton Co., Ohio, Nov. 1800. Married first Miss Sewell, ca. 1801. Married second Sarah...

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. Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

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— & Parley P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

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.— in sleighs.400

Cowan visited JS five days earlier, requesting a “talented Mormn preacher” to move to Shokokon, where he would be at “liberty to invite as many Mormons to settle in that place as May please to so to do.” (JS, Journal, 10 Feb. 1843.)  


previous to starting Wm Law

8 Sept. 1809–12/19 Jan. 1892. Merchant, millwright, physician. Born in Co. Tyrone, Ireland. Son of Richard Law and Ann Hunter. Immigrated to U.S. and settled in Springfield Township, Mercer Co., Pennsylvania, by 1820. Moved to Delaware Township, Mercer Co...

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. Gave 1 barrel. flour, 5 bushels Meal. and 10. bu of brann.— when we came on the prairie it was so cold I proposed [p. [191]]

15 February 1843 • Wednesday

Wednesday Feb 15.398

TEXT: Possibly “13 15”.  


1843  helped change the top plate of  the office stove— after reading  in the Alton

City and river port, situated on east bank of Mississippi River. Incorporated as city, 1837. Population in 1840 about 2,300. Two hundred Saints, some from Liverpool, England, detained in Alton, winter 1842–1843; Saints later departed Alton aboard steamer ...

More Info
paper about the  Libellous letter written to  Mr Bassett

Ca. 1814–12 June 1876. Teamster, farmer, miner. Born in Vermont. Son of Samuel Bassett and Anna Harmon. Lived in Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1824. Lived on Isaac Morley’s communal farm, by 1831. Baptized into LDS church and likely ordained an elder, by Jan. 1831...

View Full Bio
of Quincy

Located on high limestone bluffs east of Mississippi River, about forty-five miles south of Nauvoo. Settled 1821. Adams Co. seat, 1825. Incorporated as town, 1834. Received city charter, 1840. Population in 1835 about 800; in 1840 about 2,300; and in 1845...

More Info
about  Judge [Nathaniel] Pope

5 Jan. 1784–22 Jan. 1850. Lawyer, judge. Born at present-day Louisville, Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of William Pope and Penelope Edwards. Graduated from Transylvania University, 1806, at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Moved to St. Genevieve, St. Genevieve...

View Full Bio
. [Justin] Butterfield

1790–Oct. 1855. Teacher, lawyer. Born in Keene, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Ca. 1810, moved to Watertown, Jefferson Co., New York, where he taught school and studied law. Admitted to bar, 1812, at Watertown. Practiced law in Adams, Jefferson Co., and Sackets...

View Full Bio
&  the Ladies attending the trial  at Springfield

Settled by 1819. Incorporated as town, 1832. Became state capital, 1837. Incorporated as city, 1840. Sangamon Co. seat. Population in 1840 about 2,600. Stake of LDS church organized in Springfield, Nov. 1840; discontinued May 1841; branch organized, Jan. ...

More Info
399

Published in the 18 January issue of the Quincy Herald, the “Libellous letter” was actually addressed to John H. Pettit, editor of that newspaper. The letter deplored JS’s discharge from arrest on a writ of habeas corpus in Springfield earlier that month, charged Judge Nathaniel Pope and United States district attorney Justin Butterfield with failing to fulfill their official duties, and called into question the virtue of the ladies who had attended the hearing. While the editor of the Alton Telegraph condemned the letter as libelous, he expressed continuing contempt for JS. (“Joseph Smith the Mormon Prophet,” Quincy [IL] Herald, 18 Jan. 1843, [2]; “The Calumniators Detected,” Alton [IL] Telegraph and Democratic Review, 11 Feb. 1843, [2] ; Notice, Alton [IL] Telegraph and Democratic Review, 18 Feb. 1843, [3] ; “The Quincy Herald, Judge Pope, the Discharge of Joe Smith,” Alton [IL] Telegraph and Democratic Review, 28 Jan. 1843, [2].)  


about <1 o clock> noon  started for Skokokon

Located on east bank of Mississippi River, about twenty-five miles upriver from Nauvoo. Laid out by Robert McQueen, 1836. Location for landing rafts of lumber cut in Wisconsin Territory forests. Population never exceeded 300. JS visited area, Feb.–May 1843...

More Info
with  [John] Cowan

25 Apr. 1781–7 Nov. 1853. Farmer. Born near Harpers Ferry, Berkeley Co., Virginia (later in West Virginia). Son of James Cowan Sr. and Mary Russell. Moved near Lebanon, Hamilton Co., Ohio, Nov. 1800. Married first Miss Sewell, ca. 1801. Married second Sarah...

View Full Bio
. O[rson] Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
— & P[arley] P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

View Full Bio
.—  in sleighs.400

Cowan visited JS five days earlier, requesting a “talented Mormn preacher” to move to Shokokon, where he would be at “liberty to invite as many Mormons to settle in that place as May please to so to do.” (JS, Journal, 10 Feb. 1843.)  


previous to starting  Wm Law

8 Sept. 1809–12/19 Jan. 1892. Merchant, millwright, physician. Born in Co. Tyrone, Ireland. Son of Richard Law and Ann Hunter. Immigrated to U.S. and settled in Springfield Township, Mercer Co., Pennsylvania, by 1820. Moved to Delaware Township, Mercer Co...

View Full Bio
. Gave 1 barrel. flour,  5 bushels Meal. and 10. bu of  brann.— when we came on the  prairie it was so cold I proposed [p. [191]]
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JS, “President Joseph Smith’s Journal,” Journal, 4 vols., Dec. 1842–June 1844; handwriting and signatures of Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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; 1,045 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes shorthand and illustrations; also includes redactions, use marks, and archival stickers.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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kept “President Joseph Smith’s Journal” in four small memorandum books. The paper in book 1 is blue, while the paper in books 2–4 is white. In the first two books, the paper was printed with seventeen blue lines and extra space for page headers, whereas the paper for book 3 was printed with nineteen blue lines and no header space. The first eight gatherings of paper for book 4 were printed with sixteen blue lines and header space, while the last nine gatherings were printed with nineteen blue lines and no header space. The four volumes have 147, 160, 142, and 190 free leaves, respectively, and were sewn with all-along sewing. The leaves in books 1–3 were trimmed to measure 6 × 3¾ inches (15 × 10 cm), while the paper in book 4 measures 6¼ × 3¾ inches (16 × 10 cm). Books 2–4 have the same red-speckled stain on the page edges. All four books were bound with a tight-back case binding and have brown leather over pasteboards. Books 1–3 measure 6¼ × 4 × ¾ inches (16 × 10 × 2 cm); book 4 measures 6⅜ × 4 × ¾ inches (16 × 10 × 2 cm). The outside covers of book 1 feature an embossed pattern around the borders. The cover of book 4 is red and features a gold pattern around the borders on the front and the back.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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inscribed most of the journal entries in these memorandum books with a quill pen in ink that is now brown, although he also used blue ink for several entries. Some of the graphite inscriptions in the volumes are also contemporaneous. Richards paginated the first 114 of the 285 inscribed pages in book 1—discounting the title page that precedes the pagination—and the first 20 of the 309 inscribed pages in book 2. There is no pagination in books 3–4. In book 2, pages 11, 17, and 20–21 feature illustrations of celestial observations.
The Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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memorandum books include later inscriptions that are not transcribed in this edition. At the end of book 2, Thomas Bullock added a list of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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-era plural marriages. A few revisions, additions, or notes are penciled in throughout the volumes. There are also several use marks throughout the volumes—probably made when the journal entries were later revised for inclusion in the “History of Joseph Smith” published in Mormon newspapers in the mid-nineteenth century.1

This serialized history drew on the journals beginning with the 4 July 1855 issue of the Deseret News and with the 3 January 1857 issue of the LDS Millennial Star.  


The spines of the volumes are now labeled with blue-colored paper stickers that probably date from the early Utah period.2

The labels on the spines of the four volumes read respectively as follows: “Joseph Smith’s Journal—1842–3 by Willard Richards” (book 1); “Joseph Smith’s Journal by W. Richards 1843” (book 2); “Joseph Smith’s Journal by W. Richards 1843–4” (book 3); and “W. Richards’ Journal 1844 <Vol. 4>” (book 4; Richards kept JS’s journal in the front of this volume, and after JS’s death Richards kept his own journal in the back of the volume).  


Each of the four volumes also bears the mark of a square sticker removed from the upper right-hand corner of the outside front cover. Finally, a “Historian’s Office Archives” self-adhesive paper sticker appears in the front inside cover or on the first flyleaf of each book.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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identified himself as the scribe for the journal on the title pages of books 1 and 4. Because Richards kept the journals for JS and kept his own journal in the back of book 4 after JS’s death, the books may be included in the listing of “Drs private books & Papers”3

“Drs” in the quotation is a reference to Richards, a Thomsonian doctor. (“History of Willard Richards,” Deseret News, 23 June 1858, 73)  


in the inventory of church records made in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, in 1846.4

“Schedule of Church Records,” Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL.  


The volumes are listed in inventories made in Salt Lake City, Utah, by the Church Historian’s Office in 1855, 1858, and 1878, as well as in the 1973 register of the JS Collection.5

“Inventory. Historian’s Office. 4th April 1855,” [1]; “Contents of the Historian and Recorder’s Office G. S. L. City July 1858,” 2; “Index of Records and Journals in the Historian’s Office 1878,” [11]–[12], Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


These archival records and the physical evidence of archival stickers indicate continuous institutional custody and authenticity.
Note: The journal Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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kept for JS is divided into four physical books. The transcript and annotation here are for the first of these books, covering 21 December 1842 through 10 March 1843. The transcript and annotation for the first part of book 2, covering 10 March through 30 April 1843, are also available on this website. The transcript and annotation for the remainder of book 2 and for books 3 and 4 will be published later.

Facts