53992206

Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 1, 21 December 1842–10 March 1843

Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 1, 21 December 1842–10 March 1843

21 December 1842 • Wednesday

December 21st. President Joseph at his own house: attending a variety of business Gave instructions about a communication to A. James Arlington Bennet

21 Dec. 1788–25 Dec. 1863. Attorney, newspaper publisher, educator, author. Born in New York. Married first Sophia, ca. 1811. Served as third and later second lieutenant in First U.S. Artillery, 1 Aug. 1813–14 Oct. 1814. Published American System of Practical...

View Full Bio
.3

JS’s instructions concerned a letter Richards was writing to Bennet, whom Richards had met in August in New York. (JS to James Arlington Bennet, 8 Sept. 1842; Richards, Journal, 20 Nov. 1842; Willard Richards, Nauvoo, IL, to James Arlington Bennet, 20 Nov. and 22 Dec. 1842, draft, Willard Richards, Papers, CHL .)  


& made a particular request that Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
would act as his private secretary & historian

22 December 1842 • Thursday

22— Heard his correspondence with Gov Thomas Carlin

18 July 1789–14 Feb. 1852. Ferry owner, farmer, sheriff, politician. Born in Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of Thomas Carlin and Elizabeth Evans. Baptist. Moved to Missouri, by 1803. Moved to Illinois, by 1812. Served in War of 1812. Married Rebecca Hewitt, 13...

View Full Bio
. as prepared for Gen James Arlington Bennet

21 Dec. 1788–25 Dec. 1863. Attorney, newspaper publisher, educator, author. Born in New York. Married first Sophia, ca. 1811. Served as third and later second lieutenant in First U.S. Artillery, 1 Aug. 1813–14 Oct. 1814. Published American System of Practical...

View Full Bio
.4

On this day Willard Richards completed the letter to Bennet mentioned in the previous entry “& in the eve read it to Joseph Emma & Orson Hyde.” As instructed by JS, in this second part of his letter Richards referred to the Illinois legislature’s recent discussions about repealing the Nauvoo charter and asked for Bennet’s thoughts on the constitutionality of a legislature repealing a perpetual charter. He also asked for Bennet’s opinion on the “constitutionality, Practicability, & expedency” of the Saints suing the state of Missouri for the recovery of the property they lost there and, insofar as they had determined that the current efforts to extradite JS to Missouri were illegal, for Bennet’s opinion on the constitutionality of “bringing a suit or suits” against Carlin or the state of Illinois. The correspondence with Carlin that was prepared to send to Bennet may have included Carlin’s letters of 30 June and 27 July 1842 to JS, as well as JS’s letters of 24 June and 25 July 1842. (Richards, Journal, 21 and 22 Dec. 1842; see also Willard Richards, Nauvoo, IL, to James Arlington Bennet, 20 Nov. and 22 Dec. 1842, draft, Willard Richards, Papers, CHL ; Thomas Carlin to JS, 30 June 1842; Thomas Carlin to JS, 27 July 1842; JS, Nauvoo, IL, to Thomas Carlin, [Quincy, IL], 24 June 1842, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 233–235.)  


Recited in German to Elder Orson Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
,5

Hyde, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve, studied German in Europe during his 1841–1842 mission to Europe and Jerusalem. Hyde returned to Nauvoo on 7 December 1842 and tutored JS in German, as reflected in several entries in JS’s journal for February and March 1843. (“Letter from Orson Hyde,” Times and Seasons, 15 Oct. 1841, 2:570–573; JS, Journal, 7 Dec. 1842.)  


Bro Shearer asked the meaning of the Little leaven in 3 measures of meal,6

See Matthew 13:33; and Luke 13:21.  


Joseph.— said it alludes expressly to the last days. when there should be little faith on the earth & it [p. 1]

21 December 1842 • Wednesday

Januar December 21st.  President Joseph at his own  house: attending a variety of business  Gave instructions about a commu nication to A. [James Arlington] Bennet

21 Dec. 1788–25 Dec. 1863. Attorney, newspaper publisher, educator, author. Born in New York. Married first Sophia, ca. 1811. Served as third and later second lieutenant in First U.S. Artillery, 1 Aug. 1813–14 Oct. 1814. Published American System of Practical...

View Full Bio
.3

JS’s instructions concerned a letter Richards was writing to Bennet, whom Richards had met in August in New York. (JS to James Arlington Bennet, 8 Sept. 1842; Richards, Journal, 20 Nov. 1842; Willard Richards, Nauvoo, IL, to James Arlington Bennet, 20 Nov. and 22 Dec. 1842, draft, Willard Richards, Papers, CHL .)  


& made a  particular request that W[illard] Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
 would act as his private se[c]retary &  historian

22 December 1842 • Thursday

22— Heard his correspondence  with Gov [Thomas] Carlin

18 July 1789–14 Feb. 1852. Ferry owner, farmer, sheriff, politician. Born in Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of Thomas Carlin and Elizabeth Evans. Baptist. Moved to Missouri, by 1803. Moved to Illinois, by 1812. Served in War of 1812. Married Rebecca Hewitt, 13...

View Full Bio
. as prepared for Gen  [James Arlington] Bennet

21 Dec. 1788–25 Dec. 1863. Attorney, newspaper publisher, educator, author. Born in New York. Married first Sophia, ca. 1811. Served as third and later second lieutenant in First U.S. Artillery, 1 Aug. 1813–14 Oct. 1814. Published American System of Practical...

View Full Bio
.4

On this day Willard Richards completed the letter to Bennet mentioned in the previous entry “& in the eve read it to Joseph Emma & Orson Hyde.” As instructed by JS, in this second part of his letter Richards referred to the Illinois legislature’s recent discussions about repealing the Nauvoo charter and asked for Bennet’s thoughts on the constitutionality of a legislature repealing a perpetual charter. He also asked for Bennet’s opinion on the “constitutionality, Practicability, & expedency” of the Saints suing the state of Missouri for the recovery of the property they lost there and, insofar as they had determined that the current efforts to extradite JS to Missouri were illegal, for Bennet’s opinion on the constitutionality of “bringing a suit or suits” against Carlin or the state of Illinois. The correspondence with Carlin that was prepared to send to Bennet may have included Carlin’s letters of 30 June and 27 July 1842 to JS, as well as JS’s letters of 24 June and 25 July 1842. (Richards, Journal, 21 and 22 Dec. 1842; see also Willard Richards, Nauvoo, IL, to James Arlington Bennet, 20 Nov. and 22 Dec. 1842, draft, Willard Richards, Papers, CHL ; Thomas Carlin to JS, 30 June 1842; Thomas Carlin to JS, 27 July 1842; JS, Nauvoo, IL, to Thomas Carlin, [Quincy, IL], 24 June 1842, in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 233–235.)  


Recited in German to Elder  [Orson] Hyde

8 Jan. 1805–28 Nov. 1878. Laborer, clerk, storekeeper, teacher, editor, businessman, lawyer, judge. Born at Oxford, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Nathan Hyde and Sally Thorpe. Moved to Derby, New Haven Co., 1812. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
,5

Hyde, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve, studied German in Europe during his 1841–1842 mission to Europe and Jerusalem. Hyde returned to Nauvoo on 7 December 1842 and tutored JS in German, as reflected in several entries in JS’s journal for February and March 1843. (“Letter from Orson Hyde,” Times and Seasons, 15 Oct. 1841, 2:570–573; JS, Journal, 7 Dec. 1842.)  


Bro Shearer asked the meaning  of the Little leaven in 3 measures of  meal,6

See Matthew 13:33; and Luke 13:21.  


Joseph.— said it alludes exp[r]ess ly to the last days. when there should  be little faith on the earth & it [p. 1]
PreviousNext
JS, “President Joseph Smith’s Journal,” Journal, 4 vols., Dec. 1842–June 1844; handwriting and signatures of Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
; 1,045 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes shorthand and illustrations; also includes redactions, use marks, and archival stickers.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
kept “President Joseph Smith’s Journal” in four small memorandum books. The paper in book 1 is blue, while the paper in books 2–4 is white. In the first two books, the paper was printed with seventeen blue lines and extra space for page headers, whereas the paper for book 3 was printed with nineteen blue lines and no header space. The first eight gatherings of paper for book 4 were printed with sixteen blue lines and header space, while the last nine gatherings were printed with nineteen blue lines and no header space. The four volumes have 147, 160, 142, and 190 free leaves, respectively, and were sewn with all-along sewing. The leaves in books 1–3 were trimmed to measure 6 × 3¾ inches (15 × 10 cm), while the paper in book 4 measures 6¼ × 3¾ inches (16 × 10 cm). Books 2–4 have the same red-speckled stain on the page edges. All four books were bound with a tight-back case binding and have brown leather over pasteboards. Books 1–3 measure 6¼ × 4 × ¾ inches (16 × 10 × 2 cm); book 4 measures 6⅜ × 4 × ¾ inches (16 × 10 × 2 cm). The outside covers of book 1 feature an embossed pattern around the borders. The cover of book 4 is red and features a gold pattern around the borders on the front and the back.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
inscribed most of the journal entries in these memorandum books with a quill pen in ink that is now brown, although he also used blue ink for several entries. Some of the graphite inscriptions in the volumes are also contemporaneous. Richards paginated the first 114 of the 285 inscribed pages in book 1—discounting the title page that precedes the pagination—and the first 20 of the 309 inscribed pages in book 2. There is no pagination in books 3–4. In book 2, pages 11, 17, and 20–21 feature illustrations of celestial observations.
The Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
memorandum books include later inscriptions that are not transcribed in this edition. At the end of book 2, Thomas Bullock added a list of Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
-era plural marriages. A few revisions, additions, or notes are penciled in throughout the volumes. There are also several use marks throughout the volumes—probably made when the journal entries were later revised for inclusion in the “History of Joseph Smith” published in Mormon newspapers in the mid-nineteenth century.1

This serialized history drew on the journals beginning with the 4 July 1855 issue of the Deseret News and with the 3 January 1857 issue of the LDS Millennial Star.  


The spines of the volumes are now labeled with blue-colored paper stickers that probably date from the early Utah period.2

The labels on the spines of the four volumes read respectively as follows: “Joseph Smith’s Journal—1842–3 by Willard Richards” (book 1); “Joseph Smith’s Journal by W. Richards 1843” (book 2); “Joseph Smith’s Journal by W. Richards 1843–4” (book 3); and “W. Richards’ Journal 1844 <Vol. 4>” (book 4; Richards kept JS’s journal in the front of this volume, and after JS’s death Richards kept his own journal in the back of the volume).  


Each of the four volumes also bears the mark of a square sticker removed from the upper right-hand corner of the outside front cover. Finally, a “Historian’s Office Archives” self-adhesive paper sticker appears in the front inside cover or on the first flyleaf of each book.
Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
identified himself as the scribe for the journal on the title pages of books 1 and 4. Because Richards kept the journals for JS and kept his own journal in the back of book 4 after JS’s death, the books may be included in the listing of “Drs private books & Papers”3

“Drs” in the quotation is a reference to Richards, a Thomsonian doctor. (“History of Willard Richards,” Deseret News, 23 June 1858, 73)  


in the inventory of church records made in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, Illinois, in 1846.4

“Schedule of Church Records,” Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL.  


The volumes are listed in inventories made in Salt Lake City, Utah, by the Church Historian’s Office in 1855, 1858, and 1878, as well as in the 1973 register of the JS Collection.5

“Inventory. Historian’s Office. 4th April 1855,” [1]; “Contents of the Historian and Recorder’s Office G. S. L. City July 1858,” 2; “Index of Records and Journals in the Historian’s Office 1878,” [11]–[12], Historian’s Office, Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; Johnson, Register of the Joseph Smith Collection, 7.  


These archival records and the physical evidence of archival stickers indicate continuous institutional custody and authenticity.
Note: The journal Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

View Full Bio
kept for JS is divided into four physical books. The transcript and annotation here are for the first of these books, covering 21 December 1842 through 10 March 1843. The transcript and annotation for the first part of book 2, covering 10 March through 30 April 1843, are also available on this website. The transcript and annotation for the remainder of book 2 and for books 3 and 4 will be published later.

Facts