53992207

Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 2, 10 March 1843–14 July 1843

Journal, December 1842–June 1844; Book 2, 10 March 1843–14 July 1843

25 March 1843 • Saturday

Saturday March 25. 1843 In the office at 8 o clock. heard a report from Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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concerning theives, as given by Z. Wilson and directed. a proclamation to be published offering security to all who will divulge their secrets,—64

In the proclamation, JS as mayor noted the reported existence of a “band of desperadoes, bound by oaths of secrecy, under severe penalties in case any member of the combination divulges their plans of stealing and conveying properties from station to station, up and down the Mississippi and other routes.” Having heard that some members of the group would not provide legal authorities with information about the criminals for fear of retaliation, JS promised to “grant and ensure protection against all personal mob violence, to each and every citizen of this city” who would provide him with the names of those who were in any way involved with the thieves. (JS, “Proclamation,” The Wasp, 29 Mar. 1843, [3].)  


Received a letter from Abraham Jonas

12 Sept. 1801–8 June 1864. Auctioneer, merchant, newspaper publisher, lawyer. Born in Exeter, Devonshire, England. Son of Benjamin Jonas and Annie Ezekial. Jewish. Immigrated to U.S.; settled in Cincinnati, ca. 1819. Married first Lucy Orah Seixas, before...

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requesting the use of a cannon to celebrate the creation of the New. County of Marquetts

To counter 1839–1840 political movement to relocate Adams Co. seat from Quincy to Columbus, community leaders in Quincy used influence with Illinois legislature to form new Marquette Co., consisting of ten eastern townships from Adams Co., 1843. Citizens ...

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and answerd it that he might have it.—65

Contrary to what the entry states, Jonas, a resident of Columbus, Illinois, was requesting the cannon to celebrate the fact that the proposed county of Marquette would not be created—and to irritate the residents of Quincy as well. At the time, citizens of Quincy were agitating that Adams County, home to both Quincy and Columbus, be split into two counties, Adams and Marquette. Residents of Columbus, which was to be in the new Marquette County if the plan were approved, opposed the move. Residents of Quincy fired off a cannon every time favorable news was received from Springfield regarding the creation of the new county—a gesture Columbus residents found offensive. The state legislature approved the new county, but as Jonas pointed out in his letter, its organization depended “on the people electing County officers—on the 1st Monday in April.” Jonas wrote that those living in the proposed county “have determined not to Organize—nor elect officers—consequently the law will be inoperative.” Residents in the new county finally elected a state representative in 1846, although two years later the county (renamed “Highland” by this time) was merged with Adams County. (Abraham Jonas, Columbus, IL, to JS, Nauvoo, IL, 21 Mar. 1843, JS Collection, CHL; JS, Nauvoo, IL, to Abraham Jonas, Columbus, IL, 25 Mar. 1843, Newel K. Whitney, Papers, BYU; Collins and Perry, Past and Present of the City of Quincy and Adams County, Illinois, 94–95; An Act to Change the Name of the County of Marquette . . . [27 Feb. 1847], Laws of the State of Illinois [1846–1847], pp. 38–41.)  


also Recd. Letter from Senator Richard Young

20 Feb. 1798–28 Nov. 1861. Attorney, judge, politician. Born in Fayette Co., Kentucky. Moved to Jonesboro, Union Co., Illinois. Admitted to Illinois bar, 1817, in Jonesboro. Served as state representative from Union Co., 1820–1822. Married Matilda M. James...

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containing a bond for ¼ Section of Land from Welch John C. Walsh—66

JS was in the process of purchasing the northwest quarter of Section 8, Township 6 North, Range 8 West from Walsh for $2,500. Young was acting as a liaison between JS and Walsh during the transaction. (JS per William Clayton, Nauvoo, IL, to Richard M. Young, Washington DC, 23 Dec. 1842; JS per William Clayton, Nauvoo, IL, to Richard M. Young, Washington DC, 9 Feb. 1843, copy, Newel K. Whitney, Papers, BYU.)  


9 Baptizd Esqr Miflin of Philadilphia

Port city founded as Quaker settlement by William Penn, 1681. Site of signing of Declaration of Independence and drafting of U.S. Constitution. Nation’s capital city, 1790–1800. Population in 1830 about 170,000; in 1840 about 260,000; and in 1850 about 410...

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25 March 1843 • Saturday

Saturday March 25. 1843  In the office at 8 o clock. heard a  report from Hyrum [Smith]

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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concerning theives, as  given by Z. [[Wilson]]63

TEXT: Transliteration from Taylor shorthand: w-l-s-n  


and directed. a  proclamation to be published offering se cur[i]ty to all who will divulge their  secrets,—64

In the proclamation, JS as mayor noted the reported existence of a “band of desperadoes, bound by oaths of secrecy, under severe penalties in case any member of the combination divulges their plans of stealing and conveying properties from station to station, up and down the Mississippi and other routes.” Having heard that some members of the group would not provide legal authorities with information about the criminals for fear of retaliation, JS promised to “grant and ensure protection against all personal mob violence, to each and every citizen of this city” who would provide him with the names of those who were in any way involved with the thieves. (JS, “Proclamation,” The Wasp, 29 Mar. 1843, [3].)  


Received a letter from A[braham] Jonas

12 Sept. 1801–8 June 1864. Auctioneer, merchant, newspaper publisher, lawyer. Born in Exeter, Devonshire, England. Son of Benjamin Jonas and Annie Ezekial. Jewish. Immigrated to U.S.; settled in Cincinnati, ca. 1819. Married first Lucy Orah Seixas, before...

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 requesting the use of a cannon to  celebrate <the creation of> the New. County of Marquetts

To counter 1839–1840 political movement to relocate Adams Co. seat from Quincy to Columbus, community leaders in Quincy used influence with Illinois legislature to form new Marquette Co., consisting of ten eastern townships from Adams Co., 1843. Citizens ...

More Info
 and answerd it that he might have  it.—65

Contrary to what the entry states, Jonas, a resident of Columbus, Illinois, was requesting the cannon to celebrate the fact that the proposed county of Marquette would not be created—and to irritate the residents of Quincy as well. At the time, citizens of Quincy were agitating that Adams County, home to both Quincy and Columbus, be split into two counties, Adams and Marquette. Residents of Columbus, which was to be in the new Marquette County if the plan were approved, opposed the move. Residents of Quincy fired off a cannon every time favorable news was received from Springfield regarding the creation of the new county—a gesture Columbus residents found offensive. The state legislature approved the new county, but as Jonas pointed out in his letter, its organization depended “on the people electing County officers—on the 1st Monday in April.” Jonas wrote that those living in the proposed county “have determined not to Organize—nor elect officers—consequently the law will be inoperative.” Residents in the new county finally elected a state representative in 1846, although two years later the county (renamed “Highland” by this time) was merged with Adams County. (Abraham Jonas, Columbus, IL, to JS, Nauvoo, IL, 21 Mar. 1843, JS Collection, CHL; JS, Nauvoo, IL, to Abraham Jonas, Columbus, IL, 25 Mar. 1843, Newel K. Whitney, Papers, BYU; Collins and Perry, Past and Present of the City of Quincy and Adams County, Illinois, 94–95; An Act to Change the Name of the County of Marquette . . . [27 Feb. 1847], Laws of the State of Illinois [1846–1847], pp. 38–41.)  


also Recd. Letter from Senator [Richard] Young

20 Feb. 1798–28 Nov. 1861. Attorney, judge, politician. Born in Fayette Co., Kentucky. Moved to Jonesboro, Union Co., Illinois. Admitted to Illinois bar, 1817, in Jonesboro. Served as state representative from Union Co., 1820–1822. Married Matilda M. James...

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 contain[i]ng a bond for ¼ Section of Land  from Welch [John C. Walsh]—66

JS was in the process of purchasing the northwest quarter of Section 8, Township 6 North, Range 8 West from Walsh for $2,500. Young was acting as a liaison between JS and Walsh during the transaction. (JS per William Clayton, Nauvoo, IL, to Richard M. Young, Washington DC, 23 Dec. 1842; JS per William Clayton, Nauvoo, IL, to Richard M. Young, Washington DC, 9 Feb. 1843, copy, Newel K. Whitney, Papers, BYU.)  


9 Baptizd Esqr Miflin of Philadilphia

Port city founded as Quaker settlement by William Penn, 1681. Site of signing of Declaration of Independence and drafting of U.S. Constitution. Nation’s capital city, 1790–1800. Population in 1830 about 170,000; in 1840 about 260,000; and in 1850 about 410...

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Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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took over the responsibility of journal keeping from William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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on 21 December 1842, the same day JS “made a particular request” that Richards “act as his private se[c]retary & historian.”1

JS, Journal, 21 Dec. 1842.  


While Clayton—and Richards before him—had kept JS’s previous Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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journal in the large “Book of the Law of the Lord,” which also contained records of donations for the Nauvoo temple, Richards began this journal in a much smaller memorandum book. The journal, which Richards kept through 22 June 1844, five days before JS’s death, eventually comprised four such memorandum books. The entire first book and part of the second (through April 1843) are presented here; the remainder of Richards’s second notebook, as well as the third and fourth books, will be published in volume 3 in the Journals series of The Joseph Smith Papers.
Several pieces of evidence indicate that these four memorandum books were considered volumes of the same journal rather than separate journals themselves. For example, whereas JS’s journals kept during the 1830s were recorded in bound books or notebooks labeled with different titles—such as “Sketch Book” or “The Scriptory Book”2

See JSP, J1:53, 225.  


—the first and last of Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s memorandum books bear virtually identical titles, with the fourth explicitly identified as “vol 4”. Similarly, that books 2 and 3 lack titles suggests that each was simply a continuation of the previous book. This suggestion is made even stronger in book 2, in which the first entry commences at 4:00 p.m. on 10 March, with the events of the earlier part of the day recorded at the end of book 1. All four memorandum books are virtually the same size, and the bindings on the first three are similar.
As with nearly all the entries in JS’s previous Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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and Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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journals, JS neither wrote nor dictated the text of the entries in the memorandum books; they are based on Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s observations. For example, the entry for 22 September 1843 records only that Richards “Saw Joseph pass in a waggon with Hiram.”3

JS, Journal, 22 Sept. 1843, JS Collection, CHL.  


Despite the secondhand nature of the entries, however, Richards, a close associate and frequent companion of JS, was able to capture in detail JS’s words and actions on many occasions.
Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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had kept JS’s journal in the Book of the Law of the Lord from December 1841 to June 1842 in his earlier capacity as “Recorder. for the Temple, and the Scribe for the private office of the President.”4

JS, Journal, 13 Dec. 1841.  


When he began keeping this journal on 21 December 1842, however, he did so as JS’s newly appointed “private se[c]retary & historian.”5

JS, Journal, 21 Dec. 1842.  


The change in titles may seem insignificant, but Richards was very much aware of his new role: where he had occasionally identified himself as “recorder” and “scribe” in JS’s previous journal, he now referred to himself as the “sec.” The shift in titles and responsibilities may have been at least part of the reason the journal was transferred to the memorandum books; William Clayton

17 July 1814–4 Dec. 1879. Bookkeeper, clerk. Born at Charock Moss, Penwortham, Lancashire, England. Son of Thomas Clayton and Ann Critchley. Married Ruth Moon, 9 Oct. 1836, at Penwortham. Baptized into LDS church by Heber C. Kimball, 21 Oct. 1837, in River...

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, who replaced Richards as temple recorder in September 1842,6

Clayton, History of the Nauvoo Temple, 30–31.  


retained custody of the Book of the Law of the Lord and continued its record of temple donations.
The change in Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s title, as well as the transfer of the journal out of the Book of the Law of the Lord, may have influenced what events Richards recorded in the memorandum books. At least some of the material Richards, as JS’s private secretary, included in this journal—such as the detailed record of a medical malpractice suit over which JS presided—probably would have received much less emphasis had Richards, in the capacity of temple recorder and scribe, been keeping JS’s journal in the book that also contained records of donations for the temple. Similarly, although the ledger-size Book of the Law of the Lord likely remained in the recorder’s office, and most journal entries were probably made there, each of the memorandum books was small enough that Richards could easily carry it with him, allowing him to record many of JS’s activities closer to the actual event—both temporally and spatially—than was possible earlier.
Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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’s new title of historian was significant as well. On 1 December 1842, Richards began working on the “History of Joseph Smith” that was being serially published in the Times and Seasons, and by August 1843 he was drawing on JS’s earlier journals for that history.7

JS, Journal, 1 Dec. 1842 and 20 Jan. 1843; Richards, Journal, 1 Dec. 1842; Jessee, “Writing of Joseph Smith’s History,” 441.  


Richards therefore expected that the contemporaneous journal entries he was keeping for JS would eventually be used as the basis for JS’s history.
Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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employed various techniques in keeping the journal. For a few entries, he made lightly penciled notes and returned later with a quill pen to expand the entry. In other entries, the morning or afternoon portion of an entry was written in one ink and the evening portion of the entry in a different ink that matches that of the following entry. These changes in writing media and in other aspects of the inscribed text indicate that many entries—or parts of entries—were made on the very day of the events they described. The textual evidence in other entries indicates that they were written several days after the date they bear. Still other entries are a hybrid. Richards’s notes of sermons and legal proceedings, for example, bear evidence of both contemporaneous inscription and later revision. In some instances, Richards left blank spaces and even blank lines, apparently intending to add details later. Hurried note-taking often resulted in missing words, informal abbreviations, inconsistent spelling, and poorly formed characters. Richards revisited some difficult passages to mend or rewrite characters, revise spelling and punctuation, and add interlineations. Some of the blanks were filled while others were left standing. Richards’s notes include both immediate emendations, such as wipe-erasures made while his ink was still wet, as well as later revisions, such as knife-erasures of words written in ink that had dried. The various ways in which Richards wrote and revised entries resulted in the journal’s uneven texture but also contributed to its wealth of immediately recorded information and clarifying additions.
Over time, Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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settled somewhat into a pattern of generally recording the events of one day on one page—some pages largely empty and others filled with cramped writing—with weather reported at the bottom of the page. He made an entry for almost every day during the last year and a half of JS’s life. The journal ended when JS left Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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on 22 June 1844, five days before he was killed at the jailhouse at Carthage

Located eighteen miles southeast of Nauvoo. Settled 1831. Designated Hancock Co. seat, Mar. 1833. Incorporated as town, 27 Feb. 1837. Population in 1839 about 300. Population in 1844 about 400. Site of anti-Mormon meetings and resolutions, early 1840s. Site...

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, Illinois. Richards accompanied JS to Carthage and, during the final days of JS’s life, kept extensive notes of JS’s activities in his personal journal.
Note: The journal Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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kept for JS is divided into four physical books. The transcript and annotation here are for the first part of book 2, covering 10 March through 30 April 1843. The transcript and annotation for the entirety of book 1, covering 21 December 1842 through 10 March 1843, are also available on this website. The transcript and annotation for the remainder of book 2 and for books 3 and 4 will be published later.

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