27468

Journal, March–September 1838

I do hereby prefer the following Charges against Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
, which consists of nine in number. 1st For persecuting the bretheren, by urging on vexatious lawsuits against the Bretheren and thus dirstressing the inocent.53

In the minutes of the trial, this charge reads, “For stirring up the enemy to persecute the brethren by urging on vexatious Lawsuits and thus distressing the innocent.”a Cowdery was evidently developing a debt-collection practice, probably advising and preparing paperwork on small debts in relationship with established attorneys. The council heard testimony that Cowdery was connected with recent demands and writs served to collect notes from other Latter-day Saints, including JS.b A foundational revelation regarding church conduct directed Saints to resolve problems within church courts and not “before the world.”c Especially following the financial reverses of 1837, Saints considered bringing “brethren before the magistrates for debt” a serious breach of fellowship.d In June, JS’s brother Hyrum Smith and several other Saints signed a document accusing Cowdery of supporting “vexatious lawsuits” against the Saints in Kirtland to “cheat and defraud” them.e  


aMinute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.

bOliver Cowdery, Far West, MO, to Warren Cowdery and Lyman Cowdery, Kirtland, OH, [10] Mar. 1838, in Cowdery, Letterbook, 90–93; see also Minute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.

cRevelation, 23 Feb. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 13:23 [earlier verse order was changed], 1835 ed. [D&C 42:89].

dRecord of Seventies, bk. A, Record of Seventies, bk. A, 30 July 1837, 31–32; 5 Dec. 1837, 37.

eSampson Avard et al., Far West, MO, to Oliver Cowdery et al., Far West, MO, June 1838, in State of Missouri, “Copies of Part of the Evidence,” [21].

2nd For seeking to destroy the Character of Pres. Joseph Smith Jr by falsly insinuating that he was guilty of adultery &c.54

Testimony from George W. Harris, David W. Patten, and Thomas B. Marsh confirmed that Cowdery had made such insinuations about JS’s relationship in Kirtland with a young woman named Fanny Alger. At the trial, JS stated that as Cowdery “had been his bosom friend, therefore he intrusted him with many things”—apparently confirming the reality of a confidential relationship with Alger. JS then “gave a history respecting the girl business.”a This history may have regarded the origins of the Mormon practice of polygamy. Revelation claimed by JS sanctioning the polygyny practiced by Old Testament patriarchs was evidently related to JS’s 1831 work on revision of the Bible.b Kirtland Mormons, including Alger’s family, viewed the relationship as an early plural marriage. Nevertheless, an estranged Cowdery insisted on characterizing the relationship as “a dirty, nasty, filthy affair of his and Fanny Alger’s.”c  


aMinute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.

bBachman, “Ohio Origins of the Revelation on Eternal Marriage”; Compton, In Sacred Loneliness, 27.

cOliver Cowdery, Far West, MO, to Warren Cowdery, [Kirtland, OH], 21 Jan. 1838, in Cowdery, Letterbook, 80–83; see also Parkin, “Conflict at Kirtland,” 128–135.

3rd. By treating the Church with contempt by not attending meeting.55

Cowdery joined with David and John Whitmer in defending their absences from regular Far West church services. (See Oliver Cowdery, Far West, MO, to Warren Cowdery and Lyman Cowdery, [Kirtland, OH], 4 Feb. 1838, in Cowdery, Letterbook, 83–86.)  


4th. For virtually denying the faith by declaring that he would not be governed by any eclesiasticle authority nor revelation whatever in his temporal affairs. 5th For selling his lands in Jackson Co.

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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Contrary to the revelations.56

After receiving news that a mob had forced church leaders in Missouri to sign an agreement to leave Jackson County—the site designated by revelation for the city of Zion—JS wrote to the leaders, “It is the will of the Lord . . . that not one foot of land perchased should be given to the enimies.”a After an earlier sheriff’s sale for court costs, Cowdery with William W. Phelps and John Whitmer held residual title to three lots and full title to another. They sold their interest in the four lots on 11 January 1838.b  


aJS, Kirtland, OH, to William W. Phelps et al., Independence, MO, 18 Aug. 1833, JS Collection, CHL; see also JS, Kirtland Mills, OH, to Edward Partridge et al., Liberty, MO, 10 Dec. 1833, in JS Letterbook 1, pp. 70–75.

bJackson Co., MO, Deed Records, 1827–1909, vol. F, pp. 54–56, 11 Jan. 1838, microfilm 1,017,980, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL; Oliver Cowdery, Far West, MO, to Warren Cowdery and Lyman Cowdery, [Kirtland, OH], 4 Feb. 1838, in Cowdery, Letterbook, 83–86; Minute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.

6th For writing and sending an insulting letter to Pres. Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

View Full Bio
while on the high Council

A governing body of twelve high priests. The first high council was organized in Kirtland, Ohio, on 17 February 1834 “for the purpose of settling important difficulties which might arise in the church, which could not be settled by the church, or the bishop...

View Glossary
attending to the duties of his office as president of the Council and by insulting the high Council with the contents of said letter:57

As temporary president of the church in Missouri, Marsh presided over the March high council trial of William W. Phelps and John Whitmer. During the trial, Marsh received a letter from David Whitmer, Phelps, and John Whitmer declaring that the council was “an illegal tribunal” and that members of the council were prejudiced against them. Moreover, they signed the letter as church presidents—thereby rejecting the earlier decisions by the high council and the church in Missouri that removed them from office. The letter was written and attested by Cowdery and delivered by his nephew Marcellus. Cowdery certified the delivered copy as “Clerk of High Council”—an implicit assertion of the authority of the former presidency and the illegitimacy of Marsh and the proceedings of his council. These sentiments were made explicit in a letter to his brothers. (Minute Book 2, 10 Mar. 1838; Oliver Cowdery, Far West, MO, to Warren Cowdery and Lyman Cowdery, Kirtland, OH, [10] Mar. 1838, in Cowdery, Letterbook, 90–93.)  


7th For leaving his Calling in which God had appointed him by revelation for the sake of filthy lucre & turning to the practice of Law. 8th For disgrasing the Church by being Connected in the Bogus buisness as common report says.58

Bogus at this time was associated with counterfeit coin.a The council found the charge “sustained satisfactoryly by circumstantial evidence.” JS testified that he had warned Cowdery of an arrest warrant that would be served against Cowdery in Kirtland for purchasing “Bogus money & dies” and that when JS and Rigdon confronted Cowdery, he denied the charge. JS and Rigdon then warned Cowdery to leave Kirtland if guilty, and JS recounted that “that night or the next he left the country.”b Eight years later, in a letter to his brother-in-law, Cowdery vigorously denied having committed “crimes of theft, forgery, &c. Those which all my former associates knew to be false.”c  


a“Bogus,” in Oxford English Dictionary, 1:242; [JS], Editorial, Elders’ Journal, Aug. 1838, 58.

bMinute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.

cOliver Cowdery, Tiffin, OH, to Phineas Young, Nauvoo, IL, 23 Mar. 1846, CHL.

9th For dishonestly retaining Notes after they had been Paid,59

Sidney Rigdon explained in the trial that in January 1837, he and JS bought out Cowdery’s interest in the Kirtland printing office by making out notes to him. Cowdery, however, then wanted to purchase from them a press and some of the type. They agreed, “on conditions that he should give up the notes above refered to.” Rigdon stated that Cowdery took the press and more than his share of the type, “but the notes he did not give up.” There is no evidence, however, that Cowdery attempted to collect on the notes or sell them to a third party. (Minute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.)  


and finally for leaving or forsaking the cause of God and returning to the begerly elements of the world, neglecting his high and holy Calling Contrary to his profession
April 11th 183860

Cowdery wrote that he received notice of the complaint on 9 April 1838, which indicates the possibility that the version of Seymour Brunson’s complaint copied into the hearing record is misdated or is a revised version of the charges. (See Minute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.)  


——
The Bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. JS appointed Edward Partridge as the first bishop in February 1831. Following this appointment, Partridge functioned as the local leader of the church in Missouri. Later revelations described a bishop’s duties as receiving...

View Glossary
and high Council assembled at the Bishops office

Office for Bishop Edward Partridge. Built and finished by Joseph Holbrook. Structure used thereafter by Bishop Partridge and Far West high council to conduct business. High council tried Oliver Cowdery on numerous charges in office, 12 Apr. 1838, and excommunicated...

More Info
, in trial of the above Charges April 12th 1838 After the organization of the Council the above Charges were read. Also a letter from O. Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
, as will be found recorded in the Church record of the city of Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
Book A.61

Cowdery responded specifically to and acknowledged the validity of only the fourth and fifth charges. Denouncing JS’s ecclesiastical interventions in his personal financial affairs as a violation of “Constitutional privileges and inherent rights,” Cowdery announced his withdrawal from church membership. (Minute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.)  


The 1st 2nd 3rd 7th 8th & 9th Charges were Sustained [p. 30]
I do hereby prefer the following Charges against  Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
, which consists of nine in number.  1st For persecuting the bretheren, by urging on vex atious lawsuits against the Bretheren and thus  dirstressing the inocent.53

In the minutes of the trial, this charge reads, “For stirring up the enemy to persecute the brethren by urging on vexatious Lawsuits and thus distressing the innocent.”a Cowdery was evidently developing a debt-collection practice, probably advising and preparing paperwork on small debts in relationship with established attorneys. The council heard testimony that Cowdery was connected with recent demands and writs served to collect notes from other Latter-day Saints, including JS.b A foundational revelation regarding church conduct directed Saints to resolve problems within church courts and not “before the world.”c Especially following the financial reverses of 1837, Saints considered bringing “brethren before the magistrates for debt” a serious breach of fellowship.d In June, JS’s brother Hyrum Smith and several other Saints signed a document accusing Cowdery of supporting “vexatious lawsuits” against the Saints in Kirtland to “cheat and defraud” them.e  


aMinute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.

bOliver Cowdery, Far West, MO, to Warren Cowdery and Lyman Cowdery, Kirtland, OH, [10] Mar. 1838, in Cowdery, Letterbook, 90–93; see also Minute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.

cRevelation, 23 Feb. 1831, in Doctrine and Covenants 13:23 [earlier verse order was changed], 1835 ed. [D&C 42:89].

dRecord of Seventies, bk. A, Record of Seventies, bk. A, 30 July 1837, 31–32; 5 Dec. 1837, 37.

eSampson Avard et al., Far West, MO, to Oliver Cowdery et al., Far West, MO, June 1838, in State of Missouri, “Copies of Part of the Evidence,” [21].

2nd For seeking to destroy  the Character of Pres. Joseph Smith Jr by falsly in sinuating that he was guilty of adultery &c.54

Testimony from George W. Harris, David W. Patten, and Thomas B. Marsh confirmed that Cowdery had made such insinuations about JS’s relationship in Kirtland with a young woman named Fanny Alger. At the trial, JS stated that as Cowdery “had been his bosom friend, therefore he intrusted him with many things”—apparently confirming the reality of a confidential relationship with Alger. JS then “gave a history respecting the girl business.”a This history may have regarded the origins of the Mormon practice of polygamy. Revelation claimed by JS sanctioning the polygyny practiced by Old Testament patriarchs was evidently related to JS’s 1831 work on revision of the Bible.b Kirtland Mormons, including Alger’s family, viewed the relationship as an early plural marriage. Nevertheless, an estranged Cowdery insisted on characterizing the relationship as “a dirty, nasty, filthy affair of his and Fanny Alger’s.”c  


aMinute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.

bBachman, “Ohio Origins of the Revelation on Eternal Marriage”; Compton, In Sacred Loneliness, 27.

cOliver Cowdery, Far West, MO, to Warren Cowdery, [Kirtland, OH], 21 Jan. 1838, in Cowdery, Letterbook, 80–83; see also Parkin, “Conflict at Kirtland,” 128–135.

 3rd. By treating the Church with contempt by  not attending meeting.55

Cowdery joined with David and John Whitmer in defending their absences from regular Far West church services. (See Oliver Cowdery, Far West, MO, to Warren Cowdery and Lyman Cowdery, [Kirtland, OH], 4 Feb. 1838, in Cowdery, Letterbook, 83–86.)  


4th. For virtually  denying the faith by declaring that he  would not be governed by any eclesiasticle  authority nor revelation whatever in his tem poral affairs. 5th For selling his lands in Jackson  Co.

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
Contrary to the revelations.56

After receiving news that a mob had forced church leaders in Missouri to sign an agreement to leave Jackson County—the site designated by revelation for the city of Zion—JS wrote to the leaders, “It is the will of the Lord . . . that not one foot of land perchased should be given to the enimies.”a After an earlier sheriff’s sale for court costs, Cowdery with William W. Phelps and John Whitmer held residual title to three lots and full title to another. They sold their interest in the four lots on 11 January 1838.b  


aJS, Kirtland, OH, to William W. Phelps et al., Independence, MO, 18 Aug. 1833, JS Collection, CHL; see also JS, Kirtland Mills, OH, to Edward Partridge et al., Liberty, MO, 10 Dec. 1833, in JS Letterbook 1, pp. 70–75.

bJackson Co., MO, Deed Records, 1827–1909, vol. F, pp. 54–56, 11 Jan. 1838, microfilm 1,017,980, U.S. and Canada Record Collection, FHL; Oliver Cowdery, Far West, MO, to Warren Cowdery and Lyman Cowdery, [Kirtland, OH], 4 Feb. 1838, in Cowdery, Letterbook, 83–86; Minute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.

6th For writing  and sending an insulting letter to Pres. T[homas] B.  Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

View Full Bio
while on the high Council

A governing body of twelve high priests. The first high council was organized in Kirtland, Ohio, on 17 February 1834 “for the purpose of settling important difficulties which might arise in the church, which could not be settled by the church, or the bishop...

View Glossary
attending  to the duties of his office as president of the  Council and <by> insulting the high Council with  the contents of said letter:57

As temporary president of the church in Missouri, Marsh presided over the March high council trial of William W. Phelps and John Whitmer. During the trial, Marsh received a letter from David Whitmer, Phelps, and John Whitmer declaring that the council was “an illegal tribunal” and that members of the council were prejudiced against them. Moreover, they signed the letter as church presidents—thereby rejecting the earlier decisions by the high council and the church in Missouri that removed them from office. The letter was written and attested by Cowdery and delivered by his nephew Marcellus. Cowdery certified the delivered copy as “Clerk of High Council”—an implicit assertion of the authority of the former presidency and the illegitimacy of Marsh and the proceedings of his council. These sentiments were made explicit in a letter to his brothers. (Minute Book 2, 10 Mar. 1838; Oliver Cowdery, Far West, MO, to Warren Cowdery and Lyman Cowdery, Kirtland, OH, [10] Mar. 1838, in Cowdery, Letterbook, 90–93.)  


7th For leaving  his Calling in which God had appointed him  by revelation for the sake of filthy lucre &  turning to the practice of Law. 8th For disgra sing the Church by being Connected in the  Bogus buisness as common report says.58

Bogus at this time was associated with counterfeit coin.a The council found the charge “sustained satisfactoryly by circumstantial evidence.” JS testified that he had warned Cowdery of an arrest warrant that would be served against Cowdery in Kirtland for purchasing “Bogus money & dies” and that when JS and Rigdon confronted Cowdery, he denied the charge. JS and Rigdon then warned Cowdery to leave Kirtland if guilty, and JS recounted that “that night or the next he left the country.”b Eight years later, in a letter to his brother-in-law, Cowdery vigorously denied having committed “crimes of theft, forgery, &c. Those which all my former associates knew to be false.”c  


a“Bogus,” in Oxford English Dictionary, 1:242; [JS], Editorial, Elders’ Journal, Aug. 1838, 58.

bMinute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.

cOliver Cowdery, Tiffin, OH, to Phineas Young, Nauvoo, IL, 23 Mar. 1846, CHL.

9th For  dishonestly retaining Notes after they had been  Paid,59

Sidney Rigdon explained in the trial that in January 1837, he and JS bought out Cowdery’s interest in the Kirtland printing office by making out notes to him. Cowdery, however, then wanted to purchase from them a press and some of the type. They agreed, “on conditions that he should give up the notes above refered to.” Rigdon stated that Cowdery took the press and more than his share of the type, “but the notes he did not give up.” There is no evidence, however, that Cowdery attempted to collect on the notes or sell them to a third party. (Minute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.)  


and finally for leaving or forsaking the  cause of God and returning to the begerly elements  of the world, neglecting his high and holy Call ing Contrary to his profession
April 11th 183860

Cowdery wrote that he received notice of the complaint on 9 April 1838, which indicates the possibility that the version of Seymour Brunson’s complaint copied into the hearing record is misdated or is a revised version of the charges. (See Minute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.)  


——
The Bishop

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

View Full Bio

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. JS appointed Edward Partridge as the first bishop in February 1831. Following this appointment, Partridge functioned as the local leader of the church in Missouri. Later revelations described a bishop’s duties as receiving...

View Glossary
and high Council assembled  at the Bishops office

Office for Bishop Edward Partridge. Built and finished by Joseph Holbrook. Structure used thereafter by Bishop Partridge and Far West high council to conduct business. High council tried Oliver Cowdery on numerous charges in office, 12 Apr. 1838, and excommunicated...

More Info
, in trial of the above Charges  April 12th 1838 After the organization of the Coun cil the above Charges were read. Also a letter from  O. Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
, as will be found recorded in the Church  record of the city of Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
Book A.61

Cowdery responded specifically to and acknowledged the validity of only the fourth and fifth charges. Denouncing JS’s ecclesiastical interventions in his personal financial affairs as a violation of “Constitutional privileges and inherent rights,” Cowdery announced his withdrawal from church membership. (Minute Book 2, 12 Apr. 1838.)  


The 1st  2nd 3rd 7th 8th & 9th Charges were Sustained [p. 30]
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JS, “The Scriptory Book—of Joseph Smith Jr.—President of The Church of Jesus Christ, of Latterday Saints In all the World,” Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838; handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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and James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

View Full Bio
; sixty-nine pages; in “General,” Record Book, 1838, verso of Patriarchal Blessings, vol. 5, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
JS’s “Scriptory Book” is recorded on pages 15 to 83 of a large record book entitled “General” that also includes a list of church members in Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, Missouri (pages 2–14), a copy of JS’s 16 December 1838 letter from the jail in Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Missouri (pages 101–108), and an aborted record partially entitled “Recor” in unidentified handwriting (page 110). The book, which measures 13 x 8¼ x 1¾ inches (33 x 21 x 4 cm), has 182 leaves of ledger paper sized 12½ x 7¾ inches (32 x 20 cm) with thirty-seven lines in blue ink per page. There are eighteen gatherings of various sizes, each of about a dozen leaves. The text block is sewn all along over three vellum tapes. The heavy pink endpapers each consist of a pastedown and two flyleaves pasted together. The text block edges are stained green. The volume has a hardbound ledger-style binding with a hollow-back spine and glued-on blue-striped cloth headbands. It is bound in brown split-calfskin leather with blind-tooled decoration around the outside border and along the turned-in edges of the leather on the inside covers. At some point the letter “G” was hand printed in ink on the front cover. The original leather cover over the spine—which appears to have been intentionally removed—may have borne a title or filing notation.
The journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown and is almost entirely in the handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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. James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

View Full Bio
’s handwriting appears in a copy of the 23 July 1837 revelation for Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

View Full Bio
(D&C 112) on pages 72–74. Running heads added by Robinson throughout the journal indicate the months of the entries on the page. The volume was later used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
, Illinois, as a source for JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. During the preparation of the history, redactions and use marks were made in graphite pencil. Redactions in graphite and ink may have been made at other times as well. In 1845, the book was turned over so that the back cover became the front and the last page became the first. This side of the book was used to record patriarchal blessings. The original spine may have been removed at this time. The spine is now labeled with a number “5”, designating its volume number in a series of books of patriarchal blessings.
The volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.1

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [2]; Historian’s Office, “Index of Records and Journals,” [12], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; JS, Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838, microfilm, JS Collection, CHL.  


At some point, the leaf containing pages 54 and 55 was torn from the journal. This removed leaf—which is transcribed herein and contains, among other writings, the earliest extant text of an 8 July 1838 revelation for the Quorum of the Twelve (D&C 118)—was for a time kept in Revelation Book 2.2

Best, “Register of the Revelations Collection,” 19.  


It is now part of the Revelations Collection at the Church History Library.

Facts