27468

Journal, March–September 1838

influencing her mind if possible, to believe his power was sufficient, to make her forever miserable; provided she complied not with his request. &c. Accordingly, they came to an agreement, and were soon to be married, but fortunately or unfortunately for both parties previous to the arrival of the nuptial day, Behold!! to the asstonishment of our defendant, the husband

Ca. 1798–1887. Basket maker. Born in Ohio. Married first Sarah, by 1820. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder, before 1831. Moved to Indiana, by 1831. Disciplined at church conference at Winchester, Randolph Co., Indiana, and subsequently reordained...

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of Mrs. Jackson

ca. 1814–26 Sept. 1876. Born in Kentucky. Married first Henry Jackson. Moved from Alton, Madison Co., Illinois, to area near Guymon’s horse mill, Caldwell Co., Missouri, 1837. Present with husband during appeal heard before Far West high council, 28 Apr. ...

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arrived at home, and consequently, disanuled the proceedings of the above alluded parties, the old gentleman Lyon

Ca. 1781–30 Sept. 1839. Born in Holland, Hampton Co., Massachusetts. Married Roxana (Rocksey) Palmer, 15 July 1804, at Orwell, Rutland Co., Vermont. Presumably baptized into LDS church. Acquired land at Caldwell Co., Missouri, including town lot at Far West...

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, at this time (if not before,) knew verry well, that his god who gave these revelations, (if revelations he had,) must of course be no less than the devil, and in order to paliate the justice of his crime, sadled the whole burden upon the devil, that in scourging the person, who had previously befriended him, and counseled him in his former days; peradventure he might extricate himself from the Snare, of his own setting, and dictation. But, alass!! too late for the old man, the testimony, being closed, and the Sword of Justice, began to be unsheathed, which fell upon the old man like a scourge of ten thousand lashes, wielded by the hand of President S. Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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& George M. Hinkle

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

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, inspired by the spirit of justice, accompanied with a flow of elequence, which searched for the feelings, like the sting of so many scorpions, which served to atone for past iniquity. there were no feelings that were not felt after, there were no sores that were not probed, there were no excuses rendered that were not exceptionable. After Justice had ceased to weild its sword, Mercy then advanced to rescue its victom, which inspired the heart of President J. Smith Jr, & Geo W. Harris

1 Apr. 1780–1857. Jeweler. Born at Lanesboro, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Harris and Diana (Margaret) Burton. Married first Elizabeth, ca. 1800. Married second Margaret, who died in 1828. Moved to Batavia, Genesee Co., New York, by 1830. Married...

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who, with profound elequence with a deep & sublime thought, with clemency of feeling, spoke in faivour of the defendant, but in length of time, while mercy appeared to be doing her utmost, in contending against justice, the latter at last gained the ascendency, and took full possession of the mind of [p. 36]
influencing her mind if possible, to believe his power was  sufficient, to make her forever miserable; provided she compl ied not with his request. &c.86

According to Sarah Jackson’s written testimony, Lyon told her that JS “told him to be cautious who he cursed in the name of the Lord, for who he cursed was cursed, and who he blessed was blessed.” (Minute Book 2, 28 Apr. 1838, 159.)  


Accordingly, they came to an  agreement, and were soon to be married, but fortunately  or unfortunately for both parties previous to the nuptial  arrival of the nuptial day, Behold!! to the asstonishment  of our defendant, the husband

Ca. 1798–1887. Basket maker. Born in Ohio. Married first Sarah, by 1820. Baptized into LDS church and ordained an elder, before 1831. Moved to Indiana, by 1831. Disciplined at church conference at Winchester, Randolph Co., Indiana, and subsequently reordained...

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of Mrs. Jackson

ca. 1814–26 Sept. 1876. Born in Kentucky. Married first Henry Jackson. Moved from Alton, Madison Co., Illinois, to area near Guymon’s horse mill, Caldwell Co., Missouri, 1837. Present with husband during appeal heard before Far West high council, 28 Apr. ...

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arrived at  home, and consequently, disanuled the proceedings of the  above alluded parties,87

Henry Jackson arrived in the area sometime in November, about five months after his wife settled there. (Minute Book 2, 28 Apr. 1838, 138.)  


the old gentleman Lyon

Ca. 1781–30 Sept. 1839. Born in Holland, Hampton Co., Massachusetts. Married Roxana (Rocksey) Palmer, 15 July 1804, at Orwell, Rutland Co., Vermont. Presumably baptized into LDS church. Acquired land at Caldwell Co., Missouri, including town lot at Far West...

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, at this time  (if not before,) knew verry well, that his god who gave his  these revelations, (if any revelations he had,) must of cou rse be no less than the devil, and in order to paliate  the justice of his crime, sadled the whole burden upon  the devil, that in scourging the person, who had previo usly befriended him, and counseled him in his  former days; peradventure he might extricate himself  from the Snare, of his own setting, and dictation.  But, alass!! to[o] late for the old man, the testimony,  being closed, and the Sword of Justice, began to be un sheathed, which fell upon the old man like a scour ge of ten thousand lashes, wielded by the hand  of President S. Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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& George M. Hinkle

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

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, inspired  by the spirit of justice, accompanied with a flow  of elequence, which searched for the feelings, like the  sting of so many scorpions, which served to atone for  past iniquity. there were no feelings that were not felt  after, there were no sores that were not probed, there  were no excuses rend[e]red that were not exceptionable.  After Justice had ceased to weild his <its> sword,  Mercy then advanced to rescue its victom, which insp ired the heart of President J. Smith Jr, & Geo W. Harris

1 Apr. 1780–1857. Jeweler. Born at Lanesboro, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Harris and Diana (Margaret) Burton. Married first Elizabeth, ca. 1800. Married second Margaret, who died in 1828. Moved to Batavia, Genesee Co., New York, by 1830. Married...

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 who, with profound elequence <&> with <a> deep & sublime  thought, with clemency of feeling, spoke in faivour  of mercy the defendant, but in length of time, while  mercy appeared to be doing her utmost, in contending  against justice, the latter at last gained the  ascendency, and took full power over <possession of> the mind of [p. 36]
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JS, “The Scriptory Book—of Joseph Smith Jr.—President of The Church of Jesus Christ, of Latterday Saints In all the World,” Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838; handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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and James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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; sixty-nine pages; in “General,” Record Book, 1838, verso of Patriarchal Blessings, vol. 5, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
JS’s “Scriptory Book” is recorded on pages 15 to 83 of a large record book entitled “General” that also includes a list of church members in Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, Missouri (pages 2–14), a copy of JS’s 16 December 1838 letter from the jail in Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Missouri (pages 101–108), and an aborted record partially entitled “Recor” in unidentified handwriting (page 110). The book, which measures 13 x 8¼ x 1¾ inches (33 x 21 x 4 cm), has 182 leaves of ledger paper sized 12½ x 7¾ inches (32 x 20 cm) with thirty-seven lines in blue ink per page. There are eighteen gatherings of various sizes, each of about a dozen leaves. The text block is sewn all along over three vellum tapes. The heavy pink endpapers each consist of a pastedown and two flyleaves pasted together. The text block edges are stained green. The volume has a hardbound ledger-style binding with a hollow-back spine and glued-on blue-striped cloth headbands. It is bound in brown split-calfskin leather with blind-tooled decoration around the outside border and along the turned-in edges of the leather on the inside covers. At some point the letter “G” was hand printed in ink on the front cover. The original leather cover over the spine—which appears to have been intentionally removed—may have borne a title or filing notation.
The journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown and is almost entirely in the handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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. James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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’s handwriting appears in a copy of the 23 July 1837 revelation for Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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(D&C 112) on pages 72–74. Running heads added by Robinson throughout the journal indicate the months of the entries on the page. The volume was later used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, as a source for JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. During the preparation of the history, redactions and use marks were made in graphite pencil. Redactions in graphite and ink may have been made at other times as well. In 1845, the book was turned over so that the back cover became the front and the last page became the first. This side of the book was used to record patriarchal blessings. The original spine may have been removed at this time. The spine is now labeled with a number “5”, designating its volume number in a series of books of patriarchal blessings.
The volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.1

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [2]; Historian’s Office, “Index of Records and Journals,” [12], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; JS, Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838, microfilm, JS Collection, CHL.  


At some point, the leaf containing pages 54 and 55 was torn from the journal. This removed leaf—which is transcribed herein and contains, among other writings, the earliest extant text of an 8 July 1838 revelation for the Quorum of the Twelve (D&C 118)—was for a time kept in Revelation Book 2.2

Best, “Register of the Revelations Collection,” 19.  


It is now part of the Revelations Collection at the Church History Library.

Facts