27468

Journal, March–September 1838

The covenant of peace was to preserve each others rights, and stand in their defence, that if men should do wrong they, neither party should uphold them or endeavour to secret them from Justice but they shall be delivered up even all all offendrs to be delt with according to law and Justice Upon these terms we parted in peace, and soon every man left the ground and returned to his habitation, we came home the same knight arrived at home about 12 Oclock at knight, and found all well in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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10 August 1838 • Friday

Friday 10th Nothing of importance transpired this day the presidency

The presiding body of the church. From the day of the church’s organization on 6 April 1830, JS and Oliver Cowdery led the church in their capacity as elders. An 11 November 1831 revelation directed that “the duty of the president of the office of the high...

View Glossary
were at home, being somwhat fatigued did not leave their houses to transact much buisness,

11 August 1838 • Saturday

Saturday 11th This morning the first presidency

The presiding body of the church. From the day of the church’s organization on 6 April 1830, JS and Oliver Cowdery led the church in their capacity as elders. An 11 November 1831 revelation directed that “the duty of the president of the office of the high...

View Glossary
left this place

11 Aug. 1838

JS departed Far West, Caldwell County, Missouri, on journey to “forks of Grand River,” noncounty territory northwest of Daviess County, Missouri, to warn company of Canadian Latter-day Saints who settled outside of Adam-ondi-Ahman area contrary to his directions...

for the forks of Grand river

Area also known as Three Forks due to confluence of west, middle, and east forks of Grand River. Located about thirty miles northwest of Adam-ondi-Ahman, Missouri. Area settled, 1834. Some Saints, including many Canadian Saints, initially settled there against...

More Info
, in company with Elder Almon Babbitt

9 Oct. 1812–Sept. 1856. Postmaster, editor, attorney. Born at Cheshire, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Ira Babbitt and Nancy Crosier. Baptized into LDS church, ca. 1830. Located in Amherst, Lorain Co., Ohio, July 1831. Served mission to New York, fall...

View Full Bio
, to visit Elder Babbit

9 Oct. 1812–Sept. 1856. Postmaster, editor, attorney. Born at Cheshire, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Ira Babbitt and Nancy Crosier. Baptized into LDS church, ca. 1830. Located in Amherst, Lorain Co., Ohio, July 1831. Served mission to New York, fall...

View Full Bio
s company who came on with him from Cannada

In late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, Canada referred to British colonies of Upper Canada and Lower Canada. Divided into Upper Canada and Lower Canada, 1791; reunited 10 Feb. 1841. Boundaries corresponded roughly to present-day Ontario (Upper...

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, and settled contrary to council on the forks of grand river

Area also known as Three Forks due to confluence of west, middle, and east forks of Grand River. Located about thirty miles northwest of Adam-ondi-Ahman, Missouri. Area settled, 1834. Some Saints, including many Canadian Saints, initially settled there against...

More Info
, to give such council as is needed, This afternoon a committe from Ray County

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

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came into this place to inquire into the procedings of our sosciety in going armed into the County of Daviess

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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, as complaint had been entered by Adam Black

11 Sept. 1801–14 July 1890. Farmer, sheriff, justice of the peace, judge. Born at Henderson Co., Kentucky. Son of William Black and Jane Wilson. Moved near Booneville, Copper Co., Missouri Territory, and then to Ray Co., Missouri Territory, 1819. Elected ...

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and others in said county of Ray

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

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And said committee desired to confer with a committee that might be appointed by our Citizens, Accordingly a meeting was called of the Citisens of Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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to meet in the City Hall

Schoolhouse in town apparently functioned as city hall and courthouse, as well as church meetinghouse. Likely first located in town’s southwest quarter school lot and later moved to center of town square. See also “Schoolhouse, Far West.”

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in the City Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
At 6 O clock P.M. The following are the minuits of a meeting held in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
in the City Hall

Schoolhouse in town apparently functioned as city hall and courthouse, as well as church meetinghouse. Likely first located in town’s southwest quarter school lot and later moved to center of town square. See also “Schoolhouse, Far West.”

More Info
[p. 68]
The covenant of peace was to preserve each others righ ts, and stand in their defence, that if men should  do wrong they, neither party should uphold them  or endeavour to secret them from Justice but  they shall be delivered up even all all offendrs  to be delt with according to law and Justice  Upon these terms we parted in peace, and soon every  man left the ground and returned to his habit ation,190

Wight later recounted: “But while some of their leading men were entering into this contract, others were raising mobs.” (Lyman Wight, Testimony, 1 July 1843, Nauvoo Municipal Court Docket Book, 125.)  


we came home the same knight arrived  at home about 12 Oclock at knight, and found  all well in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info

10 August 1838 • Friday

Friday 10th Nothing of importance transpired this  day the presidency

The presiding body of the church. From the day of the church’s organization on 6 April 1830, JS and Oliver Cowdery led the church in their capacity as elders. An 11 November 1831 revelation directed that “the duty of the president of the office of the high...

View Glossary
were at home, being somwh at fatigued did not leave their houses to transa ct much buisness,

11 August 1838 • Saturday

Saturday 11th This morning the first presidency

The presiding body of the church. From the day of the church’s organization on 6 April 1830, JS and Oliver Cowdery led the church in their capacity as elders. An 11 November 1831 revelation directed that “the duty of the president of the office of the high...

View Glossary
 left this place

11 Aug. 1838

JS departed Far West, Caldwell County, Missouri, on journey to “forks of Grand River,” noncounty territory northwest of Daviess County, Missouri, to warn company of Canadian Latter-day Saints who settled outside of Adam-ondi-Ahman area contrary to his directions...

for the forks of Grand river

Area also known as Three Forks due to confluence of west, middle, and east forks of Grand River. Located about thirty miles northwest of Adam-ondi-Ahman, Missouri. Area settled, 1834. Some Saints, including many Canadian Saints, initially settled there against...

More Info
, in  company with Elder Almon Babbit[t]

9 Oct. 1812–Sept. 1856. Postmaster, editor, attorney. Born at Cheshire, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Ira Babbitt and Nancy Crosier. Baptized into LDS church, ca. 1830. Located in Amherst, Lorain Co., Ohio, July 1831. Served mission to New York, fall...

View Full Bio
, to visit  Elder Babbit

9 Oct. 1812–Sept. 1856. Postmaster, editor, attorney. Born at Cheshire, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Ira Babbitt and Nancy Crosier. Baptized into LDS church, ca. 1830. Located in Amherst, Lorain Co., Ohio, July 1831. Served mission to New York, fall...

View Full Bio
s company who came on with him  from Cannada

In late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, Canada referred to British colonies of Upper Canada and Lower Canada. Divided into Upper Canada and Lower Canada, 1791; reunited 10 Feb. 1841. Boundaries corresponded roughly to present-day Ontario (Upper...

More Info
, and settled contrary to council  on the forks of grand river

Area also known as Three Forks due to confluence of west, middle, and east forks of Grand River. Located about thirty miles northwest of Adam-ondi-Ahman, Missouri. Area settled, 1834. Some Saints, including many Canadian Saints, initially settled there against...

More Info
, to give such council  as is needed,191

Babbitt’s company of Canadian immigrants had been directed to settle at Adam-ondi-Ahman. (JS, Journal, 6 Aug. 1838.)  


This afternoon a committe from  Ray County

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

More Info
came into this place to inquire into  the procedings of our sosciety in going armed  into the County of Daviess

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
, as complaint had been  entered by Adam Black

11 Sept. 1801–14 July 1890. Farmer, sheriff, justice of the peace, judge. Born at Henderson Co., Kentucky. Son of William Black and Jane Wilson. Moved near Booneville, Copper Co., Missouri Territory, and then to Ray Co., Missouri Territory, 1819. Elected ...

View Full Bio
and others in said cou nty of Ray

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

More Info
And said committee desired to conf er with a committee that might be appointed by  our Citizens,192

On 9–10 August, William Peniston and others from Daviess County went to Ray County, where they presented a citizens’ committee with an affidavit from Black charging that the Mormons had threatened Adam Black’s life. They requested that Ray County provide militia to defend the original Daviess settlers from the Latter-day Saints. The committee recommended that Peniston present his evidence to circuit judge Austin A. King for King’s use in investigating alleged lawbreaking by the Mormons and that King should immediately initiate criminal proceedings against JS and Wight. Peniston made an affidavit with Judge King, accusing JS and Lyman Wight of leading a group of armed Mormons in a “highly insurrectionary and unlawful” manner in Daviess County, attacking Black, and threatening to kill Peniston and others. The meeting of Ray County citizens also appointed William Hudgens, Thomas Hamilton, and Israel Hendley as an investigative committee to visit Caldwell and Daviess counties. (“Public Meeting,” Missouri Republican, 8 Sept. 1838, [1], “for the country” edition; William Peniston, Affidavit, Ray Co., MO, 10 Aug. 1838, private possession, copy in CHL; see also Corrill, Brief History, 34; and JS, Journal, 7–9 Aug. 1838.)  


Accordingly a meeting was called  of the Citisens of Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
to meet in the  City Hall

Schoolhouse in town apparently functioned as city hall and courthouse, as well as church meetinghouse. Likely first located in town’s southwest quarter school lot and later moved to center of town square. See also “Schoolhouse, Far West.”

More Info
in the City Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
At 6 O clock P.M.  The following is are the minuits of a meeting  held in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
in the City Hall

Schoolhouse in town apparently functioned as city hall and courthouse, as well as church meetinghouse. Likely first located in town’s southwest quarter school lot and later moved to center of town square. See also “Schoolhouse, Far West.”

More Info
[p. 68]
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JS, “The Scriptory Book—of Joseph Smith Jr.—President of The Church of Jesus Christ, of Latterday Saints In all the World,” Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838; handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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and James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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; sixty-nine pages; in “General,” Record Book, 1838, verso of Patriarchal Blessings, vol. 5, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
JS’s “Scriptory Book” is recorded on pages 15 to 83 of a large record book entitled “General” that also includes a list of church members in Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, Missouri (pages 2–14), a copy of JS’s 16 December 1838 letter from the jail in Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Missouri (pages 101–108), and an aborted record partially entitled “Recor” in unidentified handwriting (page 110). The book, which measures 13 x 8¼ x 1¾ inches (33 x 21 x 4 cm), has 182 leaves of ledger paper sized 12½ x 7¾ inches (32 x 20 cm) with thirty-seven lines in blue ink per page. There are eighteen gatherings of various sizes, each of about a dozen leaves. The text block is sewn all along over three vellum tapes. The heavy pink endpapers each consist of a pastedown and two flyleaves pasted together. The text block edges are stained green. The volume has a hardbound ledger-style binding with a hollow-back spine and glued-on blue-striped cloth headbands. It is bound in brown split-calfskin leather with blind-tooled decoration around the outside border and along the turned-in edges of the leather on the inside covers. At some point the letter “G” was hand printed in ink on the front cover. The original leather cover over the spine—which appears to have been intentionally removed—may have borne a title or filing notation.
The journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown and is almost entirely in the handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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. James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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’s handwriting appears in a copy of the 23 July 1837 revelation for Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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(D&C 112) on pages 72–74. Running heads added by Robinson throughout the journal indicate the months of the entries on the page. The volume was later used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, as a source for JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. During the preparation of the history, redactions and use marks were made in graphite pencil. Redactions in graphite and ink may have been made at other times as well. In 1845, the book was turned over so that the back cover became the front and the last page became the first. This side of the book was used to record patriarchal blessings. The original spine may have been removed at this time. The spine is now labeled with a number “5”, designating its volume number in a series of books of patriarchal blessings.
The volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.1

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [2]; Historian’s Office, “Index of Records and Journals,” [12], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; JS, Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838, microfilm, JS Collection, CHL.  


At some point, the leaf containing pages 54 and 55 was torn from the journal. This removed leaf—which is transcribed herein and contains, among other writings, the earliest extant text of an 8 July 1838 revelation for the Quorum of the Twelve (D&C 118)—was for a time kept in Revelation Book 2.2

Best, “Register of the Revelations Collection,” 19.  


It is now part of the Revelations Collection at the Church History Library.

Facts