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Journal, March–September 1838

to that place for assestance, they said to take  Smith & Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

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, but their object was to drive  the brethren from the County of Daviess

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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as  was done in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, They said the  people in Charriton

Established 16 Nov. 1820. Village of Chariton named county seat, 1820. Keytesville named county seat, 1833. Population in 1830 about 1,800. Population in 1836 about 3,500. In Aug. 1831, while en route from Independence to Kirtland, JS met ten other elders...

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did not se[e] proper to  send help without knowing for what purpose  they were doing it, and this they said was their  errand, They came home with us, to hold a  council with us, in order to learn the facts  of this great exitement, which is as it were  turning the world up side down,244

Like Ray County, Chariton County had not immediately sent volunteers at the call of Adam Black. Instead they first appointed Sterling Price and Edgar Flory an investigative committee on 3 September 1838. Price, at that time serving in the Missouri House of Representatives, later served as United States congressman, Missouri governor, and Confederate general in the Civil War. (JS, Journal, 11 Aug. and 2 Sept. 1838; “The Mormon Difficulties,” Niles’ National Register, 13 Oct. 1838, 103; Eiserman, “Sterling Price,” 117–118, 124–125, 129.)
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

Niles’ National Register. Washington DC. 1837–1849.

Eiserman, Rick. “Sterling Price: Soldier—Politician—Missourian.” In Missouri Folk Heroes of the 19th Century, edited by F. Mark McKiernan and Roger D. Launius, 115–134. Independence, MO: Herald Publishing House, 1989.

8 September 1838 • Saturday

Saturday the 8th. Sept.  The Presidency

The presiding body of the church. From the day of the church’s organization on 6 April 1830, JS and Oliver Cowdery led the church in their capacity as elders. An 11 November 1831 revelation directed that “the duty of the president of the office of the high...

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met in  council with the committe above named, from  Charriton [Chariton] County

Established 16 Nov. 1820. Village of Chariton named county seat, 1820. Keytesville named county seat, 1833. Population in 1830 about 1,800. Population in 1836 about 3,500. In Aug. 1831, while en route from Independence to Kirtland, JS met ten other elders...

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, together with General [David R.] Atchi son

11 Aug. 1807–26 Jan. 1886. Lawyer, judge, agriculturist, politician, farmer. Born at Frogtown, near Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of William Atchison and Catherine Allen. About 1830, moved to Liberty, Clay Co., Missouri, where he became a prominent...

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, where a relation was given of this whole  matter, the present state of exitement and the  cause of all this confusion,245

The recent charge by Missourian Nathan Marsh that the Latter-day Saints were plotting a revolt with American Indians may have been a concern expressed in the meeting. JS and Rigdon made a sworn statement on this day before Caldwell County court justice Elias Higbee denouncing the charge and affirming their commitment to the laws of Missouri and of the United States. (“The Mormons,” Hannibal Commercial Advertiser, 18 Sept. 1838, [3]; “The Mormon Difficulties,” Niles’ National Register, 13 Oct. 1838, 103.)
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

Holbrook, Joseph. Autobiography, ca. 1860. Typescript. CHL. Hannibal Commercial Advertiser. Hannibal, MO. 1837–1839.

Niles’ National Register. Washington DC. 1837–1849.

These Gentlemen  expressed their fullest sattisfaction upon this  matter considering they had been outrageously  imposed upon, in this matter, They left this  afternoon appearntly perfectly sattisfied with  the interview,246

The committee returned to Chariton and reported that JS and Wight were “willing to give themselves up to an officer, to administer law, but not willing to be taken by a mob.” The committee further reported that the old settlers of Daviess County “insist that the Mormons are disagreeable neighbors, and that they are not willing to live in the county with them.” (“The Mormon Difficulties,” Niles’ National Register, 13 Oct. 1838, 103.)
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

Niles’ National Register. Washington DC. 1837–1849.

News came this evening that the mob  were to attack Adam Ondi Awman [Adam-ondi-Ahman]

Town located in northwest Missouri. JS revelations designated area as place where Adam blessed his posterity after leaving Garden of Eden and where Adam will return prior to Second Coming. While seeking new areas in Daviess Co. for settlement, JS and others...

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,

9 September 1838 • Sunday

Sunday the 9th This morning a company  in addition to what went last evening went  to Adam Ondi Awman [Adam-ondi-Ahman]

Town located in northwest Missouri. JS revelations designated area as place where Adam blessed his posterity after leaving Garden of Eden and where Adam will return prior to Second Coming. While seeking new areas in Daviess Co. for settlement, JS and others...

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to assist the bre theren there in their defence against the  mob.247

Warren Foote reported that the Caldwell County regiment of the state militia was mustered. Having moved their target date in order to avoid the Sabbath, gathered vigilantes planned to drive the Latter-day Saints from the county on Monday, 10 September. (Foote, Autobiography, 9 Sept. 1838; “The Mormons,” Hannibal Commercial Advertiser, 18 Sept. 1838, [3].)
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

Foote, Warren. Autobiography, not before 1903. CHL.

Holbrook, Joseph. Autobiography, ca. 1860. Typescript. CHL. Hannibal Commercial Advertiser. Hannibal, MO. 1837–1839.

Capt. Wm Al[l]red took a company of  ten men, all mounted, and went to entrsect  a team with guns and amunition from Ric hmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

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for the mob in Daviess

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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,248

When the Latter-day Saints in Far West learned that stolen arms and ammunition were being shipped from Ray County to reinforce anti-Mormon vigilantes gathered in Daviess County, Caldwell County militia captain William Allred was authorized to take volunteers and intercept the arms shipment. (JS History, vol. B-1, 822; Baugh, “Call to Arms,” 125.)
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

JS History / Smith, Joseph, et al. History, 1838–1856. Vols. A-1–F-1 (original), A-2–E-2 (fair copy). CHL. The history for the period after 5 Aug. 1838 was composed after the death of Joseph Smith.

Baugh, Alexander L. “A Call to Arms: The 1838 Mormon Defense of Northern Missouri.” PhD diss., Brigham Young University, 1996. Also available as A Call to Arms: The 1838 Mormon Defense of Northern Missouri, Dissertations in Latter-day Saint History (Provo, UT: Joseph Fielding Smith Institute for Latter-day Saint History; BYU Studies, 2000).

they found  the wagon broke down and the boxes of guns  drawn into the high grass near by the wagon [p. 81]
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JS, “The Scriptory Book—of Joseph Smith Jr.—President of The Church of Jesus Christ, of Latterday Saints In all the World,” Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838; handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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and James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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; sixty-nine pages; in “General,” Record Book, 1838, verso of Patriarchal Blessings, vol. 5, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
JS’s “Scriptory Book” is recorded on pages 15 to 83 of a large record book entitled “General” that also includes a list of church members in Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, Missouri (pages 2–14), a copy of JS’s 16 December 1838 letter from the jail in Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Missouri (pages 101–108), and an aborted record partially entitled “Recor” in unidentified handwriting (page 110). The book, which measures 13 x 8¼ x 1¾ inches (33 x 21 x 4 cm), has 182 leaves of ledger paper sized 12½ x 7¾ inches (32 x 20 cm) with thirty-seven lines in blue ink per page. There are eighteen gatherings of various sizes, each of about a dozen leaves. The text block is sewn all along over three vellum tapes. The heavy pink endpapers each consist of a pastedown and two flyleaves pasted together. The text block edges are stained green. The volume has a hardbound ledger-style binding with a hollow-back spine and glued-on blue-striped cloth headbands. It is bound in brown split-calfskin leather with blind-tooled decoration around the outside border and along the turned-in edges of the leather on the inside covers. At some point the letter “G” was hand printed in ink on the front cover. The original leather cover over the spine—which appears to have been intentionally removed—may have borne a title or filing notation.
The journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown and is almost entirely in the handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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. James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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’s handwriting appears in a copy of the 23 July 1837 revelation for Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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(D&C 112) on pages 72–74. Running heads added by Robinson throughout the journal indicate the months of the entries on the page. The volume was later used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, as a source for JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. During the preparation of the history, redactions and use marks were made in graphite pencil. Redactions in graphite and ink may have been made at other times as well. In 1845, the book was turned over so that the back cover became the front and the last page became the first. This side of the book was used to record patriarchal blessings. The original spine may have been removed at this time. The spine is now labeled with a number “5”, designating its volume number in a series of books of patriarchal blessings.
The volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.1

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [2]; Historian’s Office, “Index of Records and Journals,” [12], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; JS, Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838, microfilm, JS Collection, CHL.
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

Historian’s Office. Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904. CHL.

Smith, Joseph. Collection, 1827–1846. CHL.

At some point, the leaf containing pages 54 and 55 was torn from the journal. This removed leaf—which is transcribed herein and contains, among other writings, the earliest extant text of an 8 July 1838 revelation for the Quorum of the Twelve (D&C 118)—was for a time kept in Revelation Book 2.2

Best, “Register of the Revelations Collection,” 19.
Comprehensive Works Cited

 

 

Best, Christy. “Register of the Revelations Collection in the Church Archives, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints,” July 1983. CHL.

It is now part of the Revelations Collection at the Church History Library.

Facts