27468

Journal, March–September 1838

whose names aught to be immortalized, from the courage they possessed and their determination in this thing and for the victory they gained
We tarried all knight at that place and in the morning we called to see squire Adam Black

11 Sept. 1801–14 July 1890. Farmer, sheriff, justice of the peace, judge. Born at Henderson Co., Kentucky. Son of William Black and Jane Wilson. Moved near Booneville, Copper Co., Missouri Territory, and then to Ray Co., Missouri Territory, 1819. Elected ...

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8 Aug. 1838

With large company of armed men, JS called upon Daviess County justice of the peace Adam Black, demanding he uphold the law, Grand River Township, Daviess County, Missouri.

who was mainfestly an enimy of ours, for the evidences were before us that he did last summer unite himself to a band of mobers to drive our brethern from the County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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and to prohibit them from settleing in the County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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and that personally warned many of said bretheren to leave in a certain given time or they should be further delt with,186

In July 1837, after Latter-day Saints began settling in southern and western Daviess County, William W. Phelps wrote, “Public notice has been given by the mob in Davis county, north of us, for the Mormons to leave that county by the first of August, and go into Caldwell.”a Black, a local justice of the peace, was involved in the effort that season to press the Mormons to evacuate the county.b In addition, JS and others with him on this August 1838 expedition had heard a rumor that Black planned to lead a mob attack on Adam-ondi-Ahman the following day.c  


aWilliam W. Phelps, Far West, MO, 7 [July] 1837, Letter to the editor, LDS Messenger and Advocate, July 1837, 3:529; “A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” Times and Seasons, Mar. 1840, 1:65.

bAdam Black, Statement, 27 July 1838, Library of Congress Collection, National Archives, Washington DC. .

cJS, Affidavit, Caldwell Co., MO, 5 Sept. 1838, JS Collection, CHL; see also Adam Black, Testimony, Daviess Co., MO, 18 Sept. 1838, in Document Containing the Correspondence, 161.

he was obliged to confess this when interrogated upon the subject and in consequences of the violation of his oath as a magistrate in the County of Daviess

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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, we required him to give us some sattisfaction so that we might know whether he was our friend or enimy, and whether he would adminester the laws of our country or not in justice for people, we presented him with a paper to sign which was an article of peace, but he being jealous of us would not sign it but said he would draw one himself and sign it to our sattisfaction, he did so, and we left him in peace,187

It appears that the first Mormons to contact Black on this occasion were a group of about seventeen Mormon men, including Lyman Wight and Cornelius Lott, who confronted Black that morning about the rumor that he would lead a mob against them. The group intended to get Black to sign a written statement that he as a justice of the peace would do the Saints justice. The delegation returned with the news that Black “insulted them, and gave them no satisfaction,” after which over one hundred Mormons, including JS, then traveled to Black’s. Sampson Avard, a leading Danite, led a group of two or three men into Black’s house, presented him with a written statement promising to uphold the law, and, Black reported later, threatened to kill him if he did not sign. It appears that only after Black refused to sign the statement was JS brought in to break the impasse. A compromise was reached in which Black drew up his own statement. JS later stated that “no violence was offered to any individual, in his [JS’s] presence or within his knowlege, and that no insulting language was given by either party.”a Later that day, Black signed another statement, an affidavit accusing the Latter-day Saints of surrounding his home, attacking him, and threatening him with instant death if he did not sign their document. The affidavit said that JS and Lyman Wight led an armed group of over one hundred men.b In the following months, Black and Peniston made this confrontation a cause célèbre and used it to stir up animosity against the Mormons.c  


aAdam Black, Affidavit, Daviess Co., MO, 28 Aug. 1838, Mormon War Papers, MSA; JS, Affidavit, Caldwell Co., MO, 5 Sept. 1838, JS Collection, CHL; Robert Wilson, Gallatin, MO, to James Minor, Jefferson City, MO, 18 Mar. 1841, in Document Containing the Correspondence, 161–162.

b“Public Meeting,” Missouri Republican, 8 Sept. 1838, [1], “for the country” edition.

cSee, for example, JS, Journal, 11 Aug. 1838.

The same evening some of the citizens of the County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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came to visit us to sue for peace,188

This Daviess County contingent came from Millport and included John Williams, William Slade, and Sheriff William Morgan. (“Public Meeting,” Missouri Republican, 8 Sept. 1838, [1], “for the country” edition; Sidney Rigdon, Far West, MO, to Sterling Price, 8 Sept. 1838, draft, CHL.)  


we told them we would meet their principal men in a committee on the next day at that place at twelve o,clock, accordingly we did so, and entered into a covenant of peace with their principal men of said County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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for instance Judge Josiah Morin

8 Jan. 1791–25/26 Oct. 1885. Farmer, merchant, judge. Born at Bourbon Co., Virginia (later in Kentucky). Son of John Morin and Sarah Fishback. Served in War of 1812. Married first Mary Shipp, 4 July 1815, in Kentucky. Wife died. Married second Harriet Barnet...

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Mr. John Williams

1805–30 Apr. 1884. Merchant, farmer, politician. Born in Kentucky. Married first Nancy. Moved to Millport, Daviess Co., Missouri, 1836. Elected Daviess Co. treasurer, 29 May 1837; member of Missouri House of Representatives, 1838, 1842. Appointed presiding...

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Mr. James Turner

5 Nov. 1813–26 Sept. 1864. Clerk. Born in Sumner Co., Tennessee. Son of Jacob Turner and Elizabeth. Married Margaret Turner, 24 Feb. 1831, in Sumner Co. Moved to Ray Co., Missouri, by 1837. County clerk, 1837, and clerk of Daviess Co., Missouri, circuit court...

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Mr. Jacob Rogers

24 May 1811–20 Feb. 1853. Ferryboat owner, farmer. Born in Buncombe Co., North Carolina. Son of William Rogers and Nancy Holcomb. Moved to Carroll Co., Missouri, before 1834. Married Elizabeth Talbert Scott, 5 June 1834, in Carroll Co. Moved to Cravensville...

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and many others189

Morin had just been elected to the state senate, and Williams, a Democrat, had just defeated William Peniston for a seat in the Missouri House of Representatives. Turner was a clerk of the circuit court. Acting as a committee on behalf of the Mormons were John Smith, Reynolds Cahoon, Lyman Wight, and Vinson Knight—the presidency and temporary bishop of the Adam-ondi-Ahman stake—and others. (Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 22, 24–25; Leopard et al., History of Daviess and Gentry Counties, 95; “Conference Minutes,” Elders’ Journal, Aug. 1838, 61; Baugh, “Call to Arms,” 85.)  


[p. 67]
whose names aught to be immortalized, from  the courage the<y> possessed and their determinat ion in this thing and for the victory they  gained
We tarried all knight at that place  and in the morning we called to se[e] squire  Adam Black

11 Sept. 1801–14 July 1890. Farmer, sheriff, justice of the peace, judge. Born at Henderson Co., Kentucky. Son of William Black and Jane Wilson. Moved near Booneville, Copper Co., Missouri Territory, and then to Ray Co., Missouri Territory, 1819. Elected ...

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8 Aug. 1838

With large company of armed men, JS called upon Daviess County justice of the peace Adam Black, demanding he uphold the law, Grand River Township, Daviess County, Missouri.

who was mainfestly an enimy  of ours, for the evidences were before us  that he did last summer unite himself  to a band of mobers to drive our brethern  from the County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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and to prohibit them from  settleing in the County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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and that personal ly warned many of said bretheren to leave in  a certain given time or they should be fur ther delt with,186

In July 1837, after Latter-day Saints began settling in southern and western Daviess County, William W. Phelps wrote, “Public notice has been given by the mob in Davis county, north of us, for the Mormons to leave that county by the first of August, and go into Caldwell.”a Black, a local justice of the peace, was involved in the effort that season to press the Mormons to evacuate the county.b In addition, JS and others with him on this August 1838 expedition had heard a rumor that Black planned to lead a mob attack on Adam-ondi-Ahman the following day.c  


aWilliam W. Phelps, Far West, MO, 7 [July] 1837, Letter to the editor, LDS Messenger and Advocate, July 1837, 3:529; “A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” Times and Seasons, Mar. 1840, 1:65.

bAdam Black, Statement, 27 July 1838, Library of Congress Collection, National Archives, Washington DC. .

cJS, Affidavit, Caldwell Co., MO, 5 Sept. 1838, JS Collection, CHL; see also Adam Black, Testimony, Daviess Co., MO, 18 Sept. 1838, in Document Containing the Correspondence, 161.

he was obliged to confess  this when interrogated upon the subject  and in consequences of the violation of his oath  as a magistrate in the County of Daviess

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
, we  required him to give us some sattisfaction  so that we might know whether he was our  friend or enimy, and whether he would adm inester the laws of our country or not in just ice for people, we presented him with a paper  to sign which was an article of peace, but  he being jealous of us would not sign it  but said he would draw one himself and sign  it to our sattisfaction, he did so, and we left  him in peace,187

It appears that the first Mormons to contact Black on this occasion were a group of about seventeen Mormon men, including Lyman Wight and Cornelius Lott, who confronted Black that morning about the rumor that he would lead a mob against them. The group intended to get Black to sign a written statement that he as a justice of the peace would do the Saints justice. The delegation returned with the news that Black “insulted them, and gave them no satisfaction,” after which over one hundred Mormons, including JS, then traveled to Black’s. Sampson Avard, a leading Danite, led a group of two or three men into Black’s house, presented him with a written statement promising to uphold the law, and, Black reported later, threatened to kill him if he did not sign. It appears that only after Black refused to sign the statement was JS brought in to break the impasse. A compromise was reached in which Black drew up his own statement. JS later stated that “no violence was offered to any individual, in his [JS’s] presence or within his knowlege, and that no insulting language was given by either party.”a Later that day, Black signed another statement, an affidavit accusing the Latter-day Saints of surrounding his home, attacking him, and threatening him with instant death if he did not sign their document. The affidavit said that JS and Lyman Wight led an armed group of over one hundred men.b In the following months, Black and Peniston made this confrontation a cause célèbre and used it to stir up animosity against the Mormons.c  


aAdam Black, Affidavit, Daviess Co., MO, 28 Aug. 1838, Mormon War Papers, MSA; JS, Affidavit, Caldwell Co., MO, 5 Sept. 1838, JS Collection, CHL; Robert Wilson, Gallatin, MO, to James Minor, Jefferson City, MO, 18 Mar. 1841, in Document Containing the Correspondence, 161–162.

b“Public Meeting,” Missouri Republican, 8 Sept. 1838, [1], “for the country” edition.

cSee, for example, JS, Journal, 11 Aug. 1838.

The same evening some of our  the citizens of the County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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came to visit us to sue  for peace,188

This Daviess County contingent came from Millport and included John Williams, William Slade, and Sheriff William Morgan. (“Public Meeting,” Missouri Republican, 8 Sept. 1838, [1], “for the country” edition; Sidney Rigdon, Far West, MO, to Sterling Price, 8 Sept. 1838, draft, CHL.)  


we told them we would [meet?] their princip al men in a committee on the next day at  that place at twelve o,clock, accordingly we  did so, and entered into a covenant of peace  with their principal men of said County

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
 for inst[ance] Judge [Josiah] Morin

8 Jan. 1791–25/26 Oct. 1885. Farmer, merchant, judge. Born at Bourbon Co., Virginia (later in Kentucky). Son of John Morin and Sarah Fishback. Served in War of 1812. Married first Mary Shipp, 4 July 1815, in Kentucky. Wife died. Married second Harriet Barnet...

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Mr. [John] Williams

1805–30 Apr. 1884. Merchant, farmer, politician. Born in Kentucky. Married first Nancy. Moved to Millport, Daviess Co., Missouri, 1836. Elected Daviess Co. treasurer, 29 May 1837; member of Missouri House of Representatives, 1838, 1842. Appointed presiding...

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Mr.  [James] Turner

5 Nov. 1813–26 Sept. 1864. Clerk. Born in Sumner Co., Tennessee. Son of Jacob Turner and Elizabeth. Married Margaret Turner, 24 Feb. 1831, in Sumner Co. Moved to Ray Co., Missouri, by 1837. County clerk, 1837, and clerk of Daviess Co., Missouri, circuit court...

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Mr. [Jacob] Rogers

24 May 1811–20 Feb. 1853. Ferryboat owner, farmer. Born in Buncombe Co., North Carolina. Son of William Rogers and Nancy Holcomb. Moved to Carroll Co., Missouri, before 1834. Married Elizabeth Talbert Scott, 5 June 1834, in Carroll Co. Moved to Cravensville...

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and many others189

Morin had just been elected to the state senate, and Williams, a Democrat, had just defeated William Peniston for a seat in the Missouri House of Representatives. Turner was a clerk of the circuit court. Acting as a committee on behalf of the Mormons were John Smith, Reynolds Cahoon, Lyman Wight, and Vinson Knight—the presidency and temporary bishop of the Adam-ondi-Ahman stake—and others. (Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 22, 24–25; Leopard et al., History of Daviess and Gentry Counties, 95; “Conference Minutes,” Elders’ Journal, Aug. 1838, 61; Baugh, “Call to Arms,” 85.)  


[p. 67]
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JS, “The Scriptory Book—of Joseph Smith Jr.—President of The Church of Jesus Christ, of Latterday Saints In all the World,” Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838; handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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and James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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; sixty-nine pages; in “General,” Record Book, 1838, verso of Patriarchal Blessings, vol. 5, CHL. Includes redactions and archival marking.
JS’s “Scriptory Book” is recorded on pages 15 to 83 of a large record book entitled “General” that also includes a list of church members in Caldwell County

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, Missouri (pages 2–14), a copy of JS’s 16 December 1838 letter from the jail in Liberty

Located in western Missouri, thirteen miles north of Independence. Settled 1820. Clay Co. seat, 1822. Incorporated as town, May 1829. Following expulsion from Jackson Co., 1833, many Latter-day Saints found refuge in Clay Co., with church leaders and other...

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, Missouri (pages 101–108), and an aborted record partially entitled “Recor” in unidentified handwriting (page 110). The book, which measures 13 x 8¼ x 1¾ inches (33 x 21 x 4 cm), has 182 leaves of ledger paper sized 12½ x 7¾ inches (32 x 20 cm) with thirty-seven lines in blue ink per page. There are eighteen gatherings of various sizes, each of about a dozen leaves. The text block is sewn all along over three vellum tapes. The heavy pink endpapers each consist of a pastedown and two flyleaves pasted together. The text block edges are stained green. The volume has a hardbound ledger-style binding with a hollow-back spine and glued-on blue-striped cloth headbands. It is bound in brown split-calfskin leather with blind-tooled decoration around the outside border and along the turned-in edges of the leather on the inside covers. At some point the letter “G” was hand printed in ink on the front cover. The original leather cover over the spine—which appears to have been intentionally removed—may have borne a title or filing notation.
The journal is inscribed in black ink that later turned brown and is almost entirely in the handwriting of George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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. James Mulholland

1804–3 Nov. 1839. Born in Ireland. Baptized into LDS church. Married Sarah Scott, 8 Feb. 1838, at Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri. Engaged in clerical work for JS, 1838, at Far West. Ordained a seventy, 28 Dec. 1838. After expulsion from Missouri, lived ...

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’s handwriting appears in a copy of the 23 July 1837 revelation for Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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(D&C 112) on pages 72–74. Running heads added by Robinson throughout the journal indicate the months of the entries on the page. The volume was later used in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, as a source for JS’s multivolume manuscript history of the church. During the preparation of the history, redactions and use marks were made in graphite pencil. Redactions in graphite and ink may have been made at other times as well. In 1845, the book was turned over so that the back cover became the front and the last page became the first. This side of the book was used to record patriarchal blessings. The original spine may have been removed at this time. The spine is now labeled with a number “5”, designating its volume number in a series of books of patriarchal blessings.
The volume is listed in Nauvoo and early Utah inventories of church records, indicating continuous custody.1

Historian’s Office, “Schedule of Church Records”; “Historian’s Office Catalogue,” [2]; Historian’s Office, “Index of Records and Journals,” [12], Catalogs and Inventories, 1846–1904, CHL; JS, Journal, Mar.–Sept. 1838, microfilm, JS Collection, CHL.  


At some point, the leaf containing pages 54 and 55 was torn from the journal. This removed leaf—which is transcribed herein and contains, among other writings, the earliest extant text of an 8 July 1838 revelation for the Quorum of the Twelve (D&C 118)—was for a time kept in Revelation Book 2.2

Best, “Register of the Revelations Collection,” 19.  


It is now part of the Revelations Collection at the Church History Library.

Facts