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Letter, 30 October 1833

Extract of a lettter dated, “Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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, October 30, 1833.
Dear brethren,— Through the mercy and aid of our heavenly Father we are yet alive; and we are very thankful for such a blessing. Since I last wrote we have been through a scene. We declared publicly a week a go last Sunday that we as a people should defend our lands and houses. On Monday the mob, or at least some of the leaders began to move; strict orders were given with us not to be the aggressors—but to warn them not to come upon us, &c. and as court was to set on Monday, it was noised abroad that the leaders of the mob would be called upon to bind themselves to keep the peace. It was a solemn looking time. The mob had lost no time in sending rumors, and counselling; above fifty of them met on Saturday and voted to a hand to move the “mormons:”—They counselled and rode all day of Sunday. The great Monday came, but fewer people were seldom seen at a Circuit Court—No mob, but great threats. A number of families arrived last week from Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

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, Indianna, and Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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; some of whom were attacked by the leaders of the mob, but I believe they received no injury. Yours &c.” [p. 119]
Extract of a lettter dated, “Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

More Info
, October 30, 1833.
Dear brethren,— Through the mercy and aid of our heavenly Father we  are yet alive; and we are very thankful for such a blessing. Since I last  wrote we have been through a scene. We declared publicly a week a go  last Sunday that we as a people should defend our lands and houses. On  Monday the mob, or at least some of the leaders began to move; strict or ders were given with us not to be the aggressors—but to warn them not to  come upon us, &c. and as court was to set on Monday, it was noised abroad  that the leaders of the mob would be called upon to bind themselves to keep  the peace. It was a solemn looking time. The mob had lost no time in  sending rumors, and counselling; above fifty of them met on Saturday and  voted to a hand to move the “mormons:”—They counselled and rode all  day of Sunday. The great Monday came, but fewer people were seldom  seen at a Circuit Court—No mob, but great threats. A number of fami lies arrived last week from Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

More Info
, Indianna, and Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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; some of whom  were attacked by the leaders of the mob, but I believe they received no in jury. Yours &c.” [p. 119]
[William W. Phelps

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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], letter, Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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, MO, to church leaders, Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, OH, 30 Oct. 1833; The Evening and the Morning Star, Dec. 1833, p. 119.

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