53992148

Letter from Brigham Young and Willard Richards, 5 September 1840

seldom find either garden. cow or Pig.
As we pass around among the country cottages & see the stone walls which are thrown down, but more commonly the hedges in a decaying & mutilated state, it is very natural for us to enquire what have you here? & what the cause of this destruction? & we generally get but one answer, “a few years ago I had a flourishing garden on the spot you now see, & it was surrounded with this hedge which was planted by my own hand; I had a cow of my own which fed on yonder common,— I labored on my masters farm, & had plenty of time, morning, and evenings, to till my garden, in which I raised sauce enough for my family, & evry year I had a good pig, plenty to eat, & we were happy, but our Lords & masters have become more avaricious, & are trying to get all they can themselves, & will hardly let the poor live, you see my landlord has made my garden into a meadow, & feeds his own cattle upon it; the Lord of the manner fenced in the common, so that I had no place to keep my cow & I was obliged to sell her; I killed my pig to prevent its starving. The small farmes are united & made into large ones, so we could get nothing to do on the land, I have been oblige to go into the factory, with my wife & children, to get a morsel of bread;” “or, “I have taken to hand-loom weaving to keep my wife & little one from starvation.” [p. 4]
seldom find either garden. cow or Pig.
As we pass around among the country cottages  & see the stone walls which are thrown down, but  more commonly the hedges in a decaying & mutilated  state, it is very natural for us to enquire what  have you here? & what the cause of this destruction?  & we generally get but one answer, “a few years ago  I had a flourishing garden on the spot you now see,  & it was surrounded with this hedge which was planted  by my own hand; I had a cow of my own which fed on  yonder common,— I worked labored on my masters farm,  & had plenty of time, morning, and evenings, to till  my garden, in which I raised sauce enough for my  family, & evry year I had a good pig, & a plenty  to eat, & we were happy, but our Lords & masters  have become more avaricious, & are trying to get all  they can themselves, & will hardly let the poor live, you  see my landlord has made my garden into a meadow,  & feeds his own cattle upon it; the Lord of the manner  has fenced in the common, so that I had no place  to keep my cow & I was obliged to sell her; I I  killed my pig to prevent its starving. The small farmes  are united & made into large ones, so we could get  nothing to do on the land, I have been oblige to  go into the factory, with my wife & children, to get  a morsel of bread;” “or, “I have taken to hand-loom  weaving to keep my wife & little one from starvation.” [p. 4]
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Brigham Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

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and Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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, Manchester, England, to JS, Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, and Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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, Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, IL, 5 Sept. 1840; handwriting of Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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; 12 pages; CHL.

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