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Letter from Brigham Young and Willard Richards, 5 September 1840

Letter from Brigham Young and Willard Richards, 5 September 1840

seldom find either garden. cow or Pig.
As we pass around among the country cottages  & see the stone walls which are thrown down, but  more commonly the hedges in a decaying & mutilated  state, it is very natural for us to enquire what  have you here? & what the cause of this destruction?  & we generally get but one answer, “a few years ago  I had a flourishing garden on the spot you now see,  & it was surrounded with this hedge which was planted  by my own hand; I had a cow of my own which fed on  yonder common,— I worked labored on my masters farm,  & had plenty of time, morning, and evenings, to till  my garden, in which I raised sauce enough for my  family, & evry year I had a good pig, & a plenty  to eat, & we were happy, but our Lords & masters  have become more avaricious, & are trying to get all  they can themselves, & will hardly let the poor live, you  see my landlord has made my garden into a meadow,  & feeds his own cattle upon it; the Lord of the manner  has fenced in the common, so that I had no place  to keep my cow & I was obliged to sell her; I I  killed my pig to prevent its starving. The small farmes  are united & made into large ones, so we could get  nothing to do on the land, I have been oblige to  go into the factory, with my wife & children, to get  a morsel of bread;” “or, “I have taken to hand-loom  weaving to keep my wife & little one from starvation.” [p. 4]
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