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Letter from Harvey Whitlock, 28 September 1835

quick to devise wicked imaginations: nevertheless I am impressed with the sure thought that I am fast hastening into a whole world of disembodied beings, without God & with but one hope in the world; which is to know that to err is human, but to forgive is divine: much I might say in relation to myself and the original difficulties with the church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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, which I will forbear, and in asmuch as I have been charged with things that I was not guilty of I am now more than doubly guilty. and am now willing to forgive and forget only let me know that I am within the reach of mercy; If I am not I have no reflections to cast, but say that I have sealed my own doom and pronounced my own sentence. If the day is passed by with me may I here beg leave to entreat of those who are still toiling up the rugged assent to make their way to the realms of endless felicity, and delight, to stop not for anchors here below, follow not my example. but steer your course onward inspite of all the combined powers of earth and hell, for know that one miss step here is only retrievable by a thousand groans and tears before God. Dear Brother Joseph, let me entreat you on the reception of this letter, as you regard the salvation of my soul, to enquire at the hand of the Lord in my behalf; for I this day in the presence of God, do covenant to abide the word that may be given, for I am willing to receive any [p. 40]
  quick to devise wicked imaginations: nevertheless  I am impressed with the sure thought that  I am fast hast[e]ning into a whole world of  disembodied beings, without God & with but  one hope in the world; which is to know that  to er[r] is human, but to forgive is divine: much  I might say in relation to myself and the  original difficulties with the church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
, which  I will forbear, and in asmuch as I have been  charged with things that <I> was not guilty  of I am now more than doubly guilty.  and am now willing to forgive and forget  only let me know that I am within the  reach of mercy; If I am not I have no  reflections to cast, but say that I have sealed  my own doom and pronounced my own  sentence. If the day is passed by with me  may I here beg leave to entreat of those  who are still toiling up the rug[g]ed assent  to make their way to the realms of end less felicity, and delight, to stop not for  anchors here below, follow not the <my> exam ple. but steer your course onward inspite  of all the combined powers of earth and  hell, for know that one miss step here is  only retrievable by a thousand groans  and tears before God. Dear Brother  Joseph, let me entreat you on the rec eption of this letter, as you regard the  salvation of my soul, to enquire at the  hand of the Lord in my behalf; for  I this day in the presence of God, do cove nant to abide the word that may be  given, for I am willing to receive any [p. 40]
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Harvey Whitlock

1809–after 1880. Physician. Born in Massachusetts. Married Minerva Abbott, 21 Nov. 1830. Baptized into LDS church, 1831. Ordained an elder, by June 1831. Ordained a high priest, 4 June 1831. Served mission to Jackson Co., Missouri, with David Whitmer, 1831...

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, Letter, to JS, Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, OH, 28 Sept. 1835; in JS, Journal, Sept. 1835–Apr. 1836, pp. 38–41; handwriting of Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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and Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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; CHL.

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