53992092

Letter from John B. Weber, 6 January 1840

Springfield

Settled by 1819. Incorporated as town, 1832. Became state capital, 1837. Incorporated as city, 1840. Sangamon Co. seat. Population in 1840 about 2,600. Stake of LDS church organized in Springfield, Nov. 1840; discontinued May 1841; branch organized, Jan. ...

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Jan 6th 1840
Gentlemen
Your letter of the 19th ult came to hand ten days after date, immediately after which, I called in many of the prominent members of the Democratick party, with a view to unite them and their influence in your behalf; all of which expressed a willingness to aid in bringing about justice.
But, I regret to inform you that but few have exhibited that energy in the matter which might reasonably be expected from all lovers of liberty and advocates of equal rights.
Your energetick friends were first of the opinion that an effort ought to be made by our Legislature to memorialize our Reppresentatives in Congress to use all honorable means to accomplish your desires; But after holding a consultation it was believed that such a course would create a party strife here, and consequently opperate against you in Congress; Therefore it was agreed that as many as had friends in Congress should write to them immediately, desiring their aid in your behalf. If convenient, you will please write again [p. 94]
Springfield

Settled by 1819. Incorporated as town, 1832. Became state capital, 1837. Incorporated as city, 1840. Sangamon Co. seat. Population in 1840 about 2,600. Stake of LDS church organized in Springfield, Nov. 1840; discontinued May 1841; branch organized, Jan. ...

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Jan 6th 1840
Gentlemen
Your letter of the 19th ult came  to hand ten days after date, immediately after  which, I called in many of the prominent members  of the Democratick party, with a view to unite them  and their influence in your behalf; all of which  expressed a willingness to aid in bringing about justice.
But, I regret to inform you that but few have  exhibited that energy in the matter which might  reasonably be expected from all lovers of liberty and  advocates of equal rights.
Your energetick friends  were first of the opinion that an effort ought to  be made by our Legislature to memorialize our Reppre sentatives in Congress to use all honorable means to ac complish your desires; But after holding a consul tation it was believed that such a course would  create a party strife here, and consequently opperate  against you in Congress; Therefore it was agreed  that as many as had friends in Congress should  write to them immediately, desiring their aid in  your behalf. If convenient, you will please write again [p. 94]
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John B. Weber, letter, Springfield

Settled by 1819. Incorporated as town, 1832. Became state capital, 1837. Incorporated as city, 1840. Sangamon Co. seat. Population in 1840 about 2,600. Stake of LDS church organized in Springfield, Nov. 1840; discontinued May 1841; branch organized, Jan. ...

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, IL, to JS and “Associates,” Washington DC

Created as district for seat of U.S. federal government by act of Congress, 1790, and named Washington DC, 1791. Named in honor of George Washington. Headquarters of executive, legislative, and judicial branches of U.S. government relocated to Washington ...

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, 6 Jan. 1840; handwriting of Howard Coray

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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; in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 94–95; JS Collection, CHL.

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