26083

Letter from Oliver Cowdery, 12 November 1830

Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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Geauga Co. Ohio
Novr. 12th. 1830
Our beloved brethren
We arrivd at this place two weeks this day, On our journey we called at the Buffalo tribe, but stayed a few hours only but left two books with them.1

What Cowdery calls “the Buffalo tribe” was a part of the Seneca Nation of Indians (one nation of the Iroquois Confederacy) living on Buffalo Creek Reservation at the site of what is now West Seneca, New York, southeast of the city of Buffalo. Parley P. Pratt described the visit: “We called on an Indian nation at or near Buffalo; and spent part of a day with them, instructing them in the knowledge of the record of their forefathers. We were kindly received, and much interest was manifested by them on hearing this news. We made a present of two copies of the Book of Mormon to certain of them who could read, and repaired to Buffalo. Thence we continued our journey.” Pratt later referred to them as the “Catteraugus Indians.” (Pratt, Autobiography, 49, 61.)  


We then traveled [p. 207]
Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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Geauga Co. Ohio
Novr. 12th. 1830
Our beloved brethren
We arrivd  at this place two weeks this  day, On our journey we called  at the Buffalo tribe, but  stayed a few hours only  but left two books with  them.1

What Cowdery calls “the Buffalo tribe” was a part of the Seneca Nation of Indians (one nation of the Iroquois Confederacy) living on Buffalo Creek Reservation at the site of what is now West Seneca, New York, southeast of the city of Buffalo. Parley P. Pratt described the visit: “We called on an Indian nation at or near Buffalo; and spent part of a day with them, instructing them in the knowledge of the record of their forefathers. We were kindly received, and much interest was manifested by them on hearing this news. We made a present of two copies of the Book of Mormon to certain of them who could read, and repaired to Buffalo. Thence we continued our journey.” Pratt later referred to them as the “Catteraugus Indians.” (Pratt, Autobiography, 49, 61.)  


We then traveled [p. 207]
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Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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, Letter, Kirtland Township

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, OH, to “Our beloved brethren” [JS and others], [Fayette Township

Located in northern part of county between Seneca and Cayuga lakes. Area settled, by 1790. Officially organized as Washington Township, 14 Mar. 1800. Name changed to Fayette, 6 Apr. 1808. Population in 1830 about 3,200. Population in 1840 about 3,700. Significant...

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, Seneca Co., NY], 12 Nov. 1830. Featured version copied [ca. 1871] in Newel Knight, History, 207–210; unidentified handwriting; private possession. For more complete source information, see the source note for Letter to Newel Knight and the Church in Colesville, 28 August 1830.

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