26083

Letter from Oliver Cowdery, 12 November 1830

sold, one of these will fetch the money, and if our brother Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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does not come before that time, I think he will then.7

Cowdery’s apparent meaning is that one of the new converts, if not Rigdon himself, would return to New York with the proceeds from the sales of the Book of Mormon. Rigdon did go to New York, arriving there in early December. (See Historical Introduction to Revelation, 7 Dec. 1830 [D&C 35].)  


Be that sooner or later, receive him (as) if from my own bosom, for he is as I am.8

See Philemon 1:12, 17; and Galatians 4:12.  


I wish you without fail to communicate this to my aged parents.9

Cowdery’s father, William Cowdery Jr., his stepmother, Keziah Pearce Cowdery, and his three youngest siblings, Rebecca, Lucy, and Phoebe, were living in Arcadia Township, adjacent to Palmyra Township in Wayne County, New York. (1830 U.S. Census, Arcadia, Wayne Co., NY, 87; Mehling, Cowdrey-Cowdery-Cowdray Genealogy, 96.)  


Do brethren if you respect me. We expect in a few days to pursue our journey to the Lamanites

A term used in the Book of Mormon to refer to the descendants or followers of Laman, as well as those who later identified themselves as Lamanites because they did not believe in the religious traditions of their ancestors. According to JS and the Book of...

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.
Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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. [p. 210]
sold, one of these will fetch the  money, and if our brother  Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
does not come before  that time, I think he will  then.7

Cowdery’s apparent meaning is that one of the new converts, if not Rigdon himself, would return to New York with the proceeds from the sales of the Book of Mormon. Rigdon did go to New York, arriving there in early December. (See Historical Introduction to Revelation, 7 Dec. 1830 [D&C 35].)  


Be that sooner or later,  receive him (as) if from my  own bosom, for he is as I  am.8

See Philemon 1:12, 17; and Galatians 4:12.  


I wish you without  fail to communicate  this to my aged parents.9

Cowdery’s father, William Cowdery Jr., his stepmother, Keziah Pearce Cowdery, and his three youngest siblings, Rebecca, Lucy, and Phoebe, were living in Arcadia Township, adjacent to Palmyra Township in Wayne County, New York. (1830 U.S. Census, Arcadia, Wayne Co., NY, 87; Mehling, Cowdrey-Cowdery-Cowdray Genealogy, 96.)  


Do  brethren if you respect me.  We expect in a few days to  pursue our journey to the  Lamanites

A term used in the Book of Mormon to refer to the descendants or followers of Laman, as well as those who later identified themselves as Lamanites because they did not believe in the religious traditions of their ancestors. According to JS and the Book of...

View Glossary
.
Oliver [Cowdery]

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
. [p. 210]
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Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
, Letter, Kirtland Township

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, OH, to “Our beloved brethren” [JS and others], [Fayette Township

Located in northern part of county between Seneca and Cayuga lakes. Area settled, by 1790. Officially organized as Washington Township, 14 Mar. 1800. Name changed to Fayette, 6 Apr. 1808. Population in 1830 about 3,200. Population in 1840 about 3,700. Significant...

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, Seneca Co., NY], 12 Nov. 1830. Featured version copied [ca. 1871] in Newel Knight, History, 207–210; unidentified handwriting; private possession. For more complete source information, see the source note for Letter to Newel Knight and the Church in Colesville, 28 August 1830.

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