53991758

Letter to Edward Partridge and Others, 30 March 1834

This item is reproduced by permission of The Huntington Library, San Marino, California.
wisdom dictated that we should send it in its own proper light. And if truth, and the word of God will not bear off the Palms and bring us the victory, shall we, who profess to be men of God condescend to folly? Shall we turn aside from the word of God and seek to save our lives, and that we may please men? If men will seek occasion against the truth, will they not seek occasion even if we should shun the truth? The fact is, beloved brethren, we seek not gold or silver or this world’s goods, nor honors nor the applause of men; but we seek to please him, and to do the will of him who hath power not only to destroy the body; but to cast the soul into hell! Ah! men should not attempt to steady the ark of God! But enough on this subject.
Now concerning employing Mr. [Robert W.] Wells of Jefferson C’ty. as Counsellor &c. We think it would be advisable. You may consider that you have our consent: We speak to wise men! Judge ye what we say! Employ, then, Mr. Wells, and although we have neither gold nor silver, we have run into debt for the press, and also to obtain money to pay the New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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debt for Zion, and have received but a very few dollars for the Star and printing as yet, no means of speculation to gain or make money, yet we think that the money can be had, and that there will be no difficulty on this subject: and this, while you are writing to us to reprove us, and telling us, that your dependence for money is on your eastern brethren, and at the same time saying “Dont buy your gold too dear!” this is the way that we buy our gold! Now, brethren, let me tell you, that it is my disposition to give and forgive, and to bear & to forbear, with all long suffering and patience, with the foibles, follies, weaknesses, & wickedness of my brethren and all the world of mankind; and my confidence and love toward you is not slackened, nor weakened. And now, if you should be called upon to bear with us a little in any of our weaknesses and follies, and should, with us, receive a rebuke to yourselves, dont be offended, dont in anywise let it hit you, so as to turn over the dish! And when you & I meet face to face, I [p. 34]
wisdom dictated that we should send it in its own proper light.  And if truth, and the word of God will not bear off the Palms and  bring us the victory, shall we, who profess to be men of God conde scend to folly? Shall we turn aside from the word of God and  seek to save our lives, and that we may please men? If men  will seek occasion against the truth, will they not seek occasion  even if we should shun the truth? The fact is, beloved brethren,  we seek not gold or silver or this world’s goods, nor honors nor  the applause of men; but we seek to please him, and to do the  will of him who hath power not only to destroy the body; but  to cast the soul into hell! Ah! men should not attempt to  steady the ark of God! But enough on this subject.
Now concerning employing Mr. [Robert W.] Wells of Jefferson C’ty.  as Counsellor &c. We think it would be advisable. You may  consider that you have our consent: We speak to wise men!  Judge ye what we say! Employ, then, Mr. Wells, and although  we have neither gold nor silver, we have run into debt for the  press, and also to obtain money to pay the New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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debt for Zion,  and have received but a very few dollars for the Star and  printing as yet, no means of speculation to gain or make  money, yet we think that the money can be had, and that there  will be no difficulty on this subject: and this, while you are  writing to us to reprove us, and telling us, that your dependence  for money is on your eastern brethren, and at the same time saying  Dont buy your gold too dear!” this is the way that we  buy our gold! Now, brethren, let me tell you, that it is my dispos ition to give and forgive, and to bear & to forbear, with all long  suffering and patience, with the foibles, follies, weaknesses, &  wickedness of my brethren and all the world of mankind; and  my confidence and love toward you is not slackened, nor  weakened. And now, if you should be called upon to bear  with us a little in any of our weaknesses and follies, and  should, with us, receive a rebuke to yourselves, dont be  offended, dont in anywise let it hit you, so as to turn  over the dish! And when you & I meet face to face, I [p. 34]
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; Huntington Library.

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