2477114

Letter to Emma Smith, 13 October 1832

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PS while Brother Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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is Selecting goods I have nothing to do but to Sit in my room and pray for him that he may have strength to indure his labours for truly it is a tedious job to stand on the feet all day to select goods it wants good judgement and a long acquaintence with goods to git good ones and a man must be his own judge for no one will judge for him and it is much pepleccity perplexity of mind I prefer reading and praying and holding communeion with the holy spirit and writing to you then walking the streets and beholding the distraction of man I have had some conversation with few which gave satisfaction and one very butiful young gentleman from Jersey New Jersey whose countinance was very sollam he came and set by my side and began to converce with me about the cholera10

Cholera apparently spread from New York City into New Jersey, reaching Newark on 7 July. New Brunswick reported its first case on 14 July, and Jersey City experienced its first case on 26 July. (Pyle, “Diffusion of Cholera,” 62.)  


and I learned he had been seased with it and came very near dieng dying with it he said the Lord had spared him for some wise purpose I took advantage of this and opened a long discours with him he received my teaching appearanly apparently with much pleasure and became very strongly attacth attached to me we talkd till late at night and concluded to omit conversation till the next day but having some business to do he was detained untill the boat was ready to go out and must leave he came to me and bid me Farewell and we parted with much reluctance Brother Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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is received with great kindness by all his old acquaintance he is faithful in prayr and fervant in spirit and we take great comfort together there is about one hundred boarders and sometimes more in this house every day from one to two from all parts of the world I think you would have laughed right harty if you could have been where you could see the waiters to day noon waited on the table both Black and white and molato runing bowing and maneuvering but I must conclude I remain Your affectionate Husband until Death
Joseph Smith Junior [p. [3]]
PS while Brother [Newel K.] Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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<is> Selecting goods I have  nothing to <do> but to Sit in my room and pray for him that  he may have strength to indure his labours for truly  it is <a> tedious job to stand on the feet all day to select  goods its wants good judgement and a long acquaintence  with goods to git good ones and a man must be  his own judge for no one will judge for him and  it is much pepleccity [perplexity] of mind I prefer reading and  praying and holding communeion with the holy spirit  and writing to <you> then walking the streets and beholding  the distraction of man I have <had> some conversation with  few which gave satisfaction and one very butiful  young gentleman from Jersey [New Jersey] whose countinance was  very sollam he came and set by my side and began9

TEXT: Possibly “begun”.  


to  converce with me about the chol[e]ra10

Cholera apparently spread from New York City into New Jersey, reaching Newark on 7 July. New Brunswick reported its first case on 14 July, and Jersey City experienced its first case on 26 July. (Pyle, “Diffusion of Cholera,” 62.)  


and I learned he  had been seased with it and came very near dieng  [dying] with it he said the Lord had spared him for some  wise pu[r]pose I took advantage of this and opened a  long discours with him he received my teaching with  appearanly [apparently] with much pleasure and became very  strongly attacth [attached] to me we talkd till late at nig ht and concluded to omit <conversation> till the next day  but having some business to do he was detai ned untill the boat was ready to go out and must  leave he came to me and bid me Farewell <and we parted> with  much reluctance Brother Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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is received with  great kindness by all his old acquaintance he  is faithful in prayr and fervant in spirit  and he we take great comfort together there  is about one hundred boarders and sometimes more  in this house every <day> from one to two from  all parts of the world I think you would have  laughed right harty if you could [have?] been whe[r] e you could see the waiters to day noon waited  on the table both Black and white and molato  runing bowing and maneuvering but I must  conclude I remain Your affectionate Husband  until Death
Joseph Smith Junior [p. [3]]
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JS, Letter, New York City

Dutch founded New Netherland colony, 1625. Incorporated under British control and renamed New York, 1664. Harbor contributed to economic and population growth of city; became largest city in American colonies. British troops defeated Continental Army under...

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, NY, to Emma Smith

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

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, Kirtland Township

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, OH, 13 Oct. 1832; handwriting and signatures of JS; three pages; CCLA. Includes address, postal markings, dockets, and archival marking.
Two loose leaves, measuring 9¾ × 7¾ inches (25 × 20 cm). JS apparently folded the document to create a margin line prior to inscription. The document was folded with two tri-folds in letter style, addressed, and sealed with a red adhesive wafer. The postage rate was inscribed in a large and elaborate script in red ink. A circular date stamp was applied in red ink. Docket in handwriting of Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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reads: “Joseph Smith Jr | Oct 13th 1832 N. York

Dutch founded New Netherland colony, 1625. Incorporated under British control and renamed New York, 1664. Harbor contributed to economic and population growth of city; became largest city in American colonies. British troops defeated Continental Army under...

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”. The document was refolded, apparently at a later time, probably in connection with filing. Additional docket in unidentified handwriting reads: “J. Smith | Oct 13 1832”. The two leaves appear to have been sewn together at some point in time. Graphite pagination added on the recto pages of the two leaves suggests that at one time the letter was placed in an archival letter file or book. The document has undergone some conservation.
The document includes two autograph signatures. It was apparently received and kept by Emma Smith

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

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. The presence of the Willard Richards

24 June 1804–11 Mar. 1854. Teacher, lecturer, doctor, clerk, printer, editor, postmaster. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Moved to Richmond, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts, 1813. Moved to Chatham, Columbia...

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docket suggests that the letter was kept for a time in JS’s office in Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois. The document was apparently returned to Emma Smith because it came into the possession of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (now Community of Christ). A late nineteenth-century printing of the letter in the periodical of the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints and late twentieth-century archival correspondence indicate continuous institutional custody.1

“Letters of Joseph Smith, the Martyr,” Saints’ Herald, 1 Dec. 1879, 356–357; Richard P. Howard, Independence, MO, to Richard Lloyd Anderson, Provo, UT, 10 Sept. 1971, photocopy, CHL.  


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