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Letter to Hyrum Smith with Agnes Coolbrith Smith postscript, 11 April 1839

Letter to Hyrum Smith with Agnes Coolbrith Smith postscript, 11 April 1839

Quincy April 11th 1839
Brother Hyrum [Smith], after reading a line from you to myself, and one to Father  which awakens all the feelings of tenderness and brotherly affection that one heart is capable of  containing, I sit down in haste to answer it; My health and that of my family is  tolerable good, Mother and Lucy [Smith] have been very sick but are getting better. Your family  are in better health now than at any other period since your confinement: Mary [Fielding Smith] is getting  tolerable good health, she is doing the best she can for the good and enjoyment of the chil dren; the family are all together and seem to be contented. Lovina is a good girl  and has quite a motherly care for the children, and takes considerable interest in the  welfare of her mother. As respects you fears concerning Mary, you may put them  to rest: I believe that she is your friend, and desires to promote your happiness; I have  no fault to find with Mary, for she has had a long fit of sickness, and where there has  been a lack of wisdom, had she been well and had her own way, there would in all prob ability been no call for the observations that I made in my letter to you. I think it  will be wisdom for Sister [Mercy Fielding] Thompson to remain where she is at present. The course that  we have pursued I think has proved advantageous to her. Brother Hyram I am  in hopes that my letter did not increase your trouble, for I know that your  affliction is too great for human nature to bear, and if I did not know that there  was a God in Heaven, and that his promises are sure and faithful, and that he is  your friend in the midst of all your trouble, I would fly to your relief and either be with  you in prison, or see you breathe free air, air too that had not been inhaled by and  corrupted by a pack of ruffians who trample upon virtue and innocence with impunity  and are not even satisfied with the property and blood of the Saints, but must exult  over the dead. You both have my prayers, my influence, and warmest feelings  with a fixed determination if it should so be, that you should be destroyed, to avenge  your blood four fold. Joseph must excuse me for not writing to him at this time  Give my love to all the prisoners, write to me as often as you can, and do not be worried  about your families; Your’s in affliction as well as in peace.
Next
Don Carlos Smith, letter, Quincy, IL, to Hyrum Smith, Liberty, MO, 11 Apr. 1839, with postscript by Agnes Coolbrith Smith; handwriting of James Mulholland; in JS Letterbook 2, pp. 39–40; JS Collection, CHL.

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