21225849

Letter to the Church and Edward Partridge, 20 March 1839

according as his work shall be and now beloved Brethren we say unto [you] that in asmuch as God hath said that he would have a tried people that he would purge them as gold now we think that this time he has chosen his own crusible wherein we have been tryed and we think if we get through with any degree of safty and shall have keept the faith that it will be a sign to this generation all together sufficient to leave them without excuse and we think also that it will be a tryal of our faith equal to that of Abraham and that the antionts will not have were off [whereof] to bost over us in the day of judgment as being called to pass through heavier afflictions that we may hold an even waight in the balances with them but now after having suffered so grate a sacrifis and having pased through so grate a scene of sorrow we trust that a Ram may be caught in the thicket speedily to releave the sons and daughters of Abraham from their great anxiety and to light up the lamp of salvation upon their countinances that they may hold on now after having gone so far unto ever lasting life. Now brethren conserning the places for the location of the saints we cannot counsyl you as we could if we were presant with you and as to the things that ware writen heartofore we did not concider them any thing verry binding therfore we now say once for all that we think it most proper that the general affairs of the church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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which are nessisary [p. 10]
according their <as his> work shall be and now beloved Brethren  we say unto [you?] that in asmuch as good <God> hath said that he  would have a tried people that he would purge them  as gold now we think that this time he has cho sen his own crusible wherein we have been tryed  and we think if we get through with any degree of  safty and shall have keept the faith that it will be  a sign to this generation all together sufficient to leave  them without excuse and we think also that it  will be a tryal of our faith equal to that of  Abraham and that the antionts will not have  were off [whereof] to bost over us in the day of judgment  as being called to pass through heavier afflictions  that we may hold an even waight in the balances  with them but now after having suffered so grate a  sacrifis and having pased through so grate a scene  of sorrow we trust that a Ram may be caught in the  thicket speedily to releave the sons and daughters of Abr aham from their grate <great> anxiety and to light up the  lamp of salvation upon their countinances that they  may hold up <on> now after having gone so far unto ever  lasting life. Now brethren conserning the places for  the location of the saints we cannot counsyl you as  we could if we were presant with you and <as> to the  things that ware writen heartofore we did not  concider them any thing verry binding therfore we  now say once for all that we think it most proper  that the general affairs of the church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
which are nessisary [p. 10]
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, IL, 20 Mar. 1839; handwriting of Alexander McRae and Caleb Baldwin with corrections by JS and signatures of JS, Hyrum Smith, Lyman Wight, Caleb Baldwin, and Alexander McRae; 26 pages; Revelations Collection, CHL. Includes endorsements.

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