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Letter to the Church and Edward Partridge, 20 March 1839

henceforth be always ready to obey the truth without having mens persons in admiration because of advantage it is expediant that we should be aware of such things. And we ought always to be aware of those prejudices which sometimes so strangly presented themselves and are so congenial to human nature against our nieghbors friends and brethren of the world who choose to differ with us in opinion and in matters of faith. Our religeon is betwean us and our God. Their religeon is betwean them and their God. There is a ty from God that should be exercised towards those of our faith who walk uprightly which is peculiar to itself but it is without prejudice but gives scope to the mind which inables us to conduct ourselves with grater liberality to-wards all others that are not of our faith than what they exercise towards one another these principals approximate nearer to the mind of God because it is like God or God like. There is a principal also which we are bound to be exercised with that is in common with all men such as governments and laws and regulations in the civil conserns of life This principal guarentees to all parties sects and denominations and classes of religeon equal coherant and indefeasible rights they are things that pertain to this life therefore all are alike interested they make our responcibilities one towards another in matters of corruptible things while the former principals do not distroy the latter but bind us stronger and make our responcibilities not only one to another but unto God also hence we say that the constitution of the unitid States

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

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is a glorious standard it is founded in the wisdom of God. it is a heavenly banner it is to all those who are privilaged with the sweats of its liberty like the cooling shades and refreshing watters of a greate rock in a thirsty and a weary land it is like a greate [p. 8]
henceforth be always ready to obey the truth without  having mens persons in admiration because of adv antage it is expediant that we should be aware of such  things. And we should ought always to be aware of those  prejudices which sometimes so strangly presented  themselves and are so congenial to human nature  against our nieghbors friends and brethren of the  world who choose to differ with us in opinion and in  matters of faith. Our religeon is betwean us and our  God. Their religeon is betwean them and their God.  There is a ty from God that should be exercised towards  those of our faith who walk uprightly which is peculi ar to itself but it is without prejudice but gives scope  to the mind which inables us to conduct ourselves  with grater liberality to-wards all others that are not  of our faith than what they exercise towards one an other these principals approximate nearer to the mind  of God because it is like God or God like. There is a principal  also which we are bound to be exercised with that is in  common with all men such as governments and  laws and regulations in the civil conserns of life  This principal guarentees to all parties sects and deno minations and classes of religeon equal coherant and  indefeasible rights they are things that pertain to this life  therefore all are alike interested they make our respon cibilities one towards another in matters of corruptible  things while the former principals do not distroy  the latter but bind us stronger and make our responcibi lities not only one to another but unto God also hence  we say that the constitution of the unitid States

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

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is  a glorious standard it is founded in the wisdom  of God. it is a heavenly banner it is to all those who  are privilaged with the sweats of its liberty like  the cooling shades and refreshing watters of a greate  rock in a thirsty and a weary land it is like a greate [p. 8]
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, IL, 20 Mar. 1839; handwriting of Alexander McRae and Caleb Baldwin with corrections by JS and signatures of JS, Hyrum Smith, Lyman Wight, Caleb Baldwin, and Alexander McRae; 26 pages; Revelations Collection, CHL. Includes endorsements.

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