53992924

Letter to the Elders of the Church, 2 October 1835

“Thy watchmen shall lift up the voice; with the voice together shall they sing: for they shall see eye to eye, when the Lord shall bring again Zion.”—Isaiah 52:8.
Here we pause for a moment, to make a few remarks upon the idea of gathering

As directed by early revelations, church members “gathered” in communities. A revelation dated September 1830, for instance, instructed elders “to bring to pass the gathering of mine elect” who would “be gathered in unto one place, upon the face of this land...

View Glossary
to this place. It is well known that there were lands belonging to the government, to be sold to individuals; and it was understood by all, at least we believed so, that we lived in a free country, a land of liberty and of laws, guaranteeing to every man, or any company of men, the right of purchasing lands, and settling, and living upon them: therefore we thought no harm in advising the Latter Day Saints

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
, or Mormons, as they are reproachfully called, to gather to this place, inasmuch as it was their duty, (and it was well understood so to be,) to purchase, with money, lands, and live upon them—not infringing upon the civil rights of any individual, or community of people: always keeping in view the saying, “Do unto others as you would wish to have others do unto you.” Following also the good injunction: “Deal justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with thy God.”
These were our motives in teaching the people, or Latter Day Saints, to gather together, beginning at this place. And inasmuch as there are those who have had different views from this, we feel, that it is a cause of deep regret: For, be it known unto all men, that our principles concerning this thing, have not been such as have been represented by those who, we have every reason to believe, are designing and wicked men, that have said that this was our doctrine:—to infringe upon the rights of a people who inhabit our civil and free country: such as to drive the inhabitants of Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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from their lands, and take possession thereof unlawfully. Far, yea, far be such a principle from our hearts: it never entered into our mind, and we only say, that God shall reward such in that day when he shall come to make up his jewels.
But to return to my subject: after having ascertained the very spot, and having the happiness of seeing quite a number of the families of my brethren, comfortably situated upon the land, I took leave of them, and journeyed back to Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

More Info
, and used every influence and argument, that lay in my power, to get those who believe in the everlasting covenant

Generally referred to the “fulness of the gospel”—the sum total of the church’s message, geared toward establishing God’s covenant people on the earth; also used to describe individual elements of the gospel, including marriage. According to JS, the everlasting...

View Glossary
, whose circumstances woulp would admit, and whose families were willing to remove to the place which I now designated to be the land of Zion: And thus the sound of the gathering, and of the doctrine, went abroad into the world; and many we have reason to fear, having a zeal not according to knowledge, not understanding the pure principles of the doctrine of the church, have no doubt, in the heat of enthusiasm, taught and said many things which are derogatory to the genuine character and principles of the church, and for these things we are heartily sorry, and would apologize if an apology would do any good.
But we pause here and offer a remark upon the saying which we learn has gone abroad, and has been handled in a manner detrimental to the cause of truth, by saying, “that in preaching the doctrine of gathering, we break up families, and give license for men to leave their families; women their husbands; children their parents, and slaves their masters, thereby deranging the order, and breaking up the harmony and peace of society.” We shall here show our faith, and thereby, as we humbly trust, put an end to these faults false, and wicked misrepresentations, which have caused, we have every reason to believe, thousands to think they were doing God’s service, when they were persecuting the children of God: whereas, if they could have enjoyed the true light, and had a just understanding of our principles, they would have embraced them with all their hearts, and been rejoicing in the love of the truth.
And now to show our doctrine on this subject, we shall commence with the first principles of the gospel, which are repentance, and baptism for the remission of sins

An ordinance in which an individual is immersed in water for the remission of sins. The Book of Mormon explained that those with necessary authority were to baptize individuals who had repented of their sins. Baptized individuals also received the gift of...

View Glossary
, and the gift of the Holy Ghost by the laying on of the hands

A practice in which individuals place their hands upon a person to bestow the gift of the Holy Ghost, ordain to an office or calling, or confer other power, authority, or blessings, often as part of an ordinance. The Book of Mormon explained that ecclesiastical...

View Glossary
. This we believe to be our duty, to teach to all mankind the doctrine of repentance, which we shall endeavor to show from the following quotations:
“Then opened he their understanding, that they might understand the scriptures, and said unto them, thus it is written, and thus it behoved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the dead, the third day; and that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in his name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem.”—Luke 24:45,46,47.
By this we learn, that it behoved Christ to suffer, and to be crucified, and rise again on the third day, for the express purpose that repentance and [p. 180]
“Thy watchmen shall lift up the voice;  with the voice together shall they sing: for  they shall see eye to eye, when the Lord shall  bring again Zion.”—Isaiah 52:8.
Here we pause for a moment, to  make a few remarks upon the idea of  gathering

As directed by early revelations, church members “gathered” in communities. A revelation dated September 1830, for instance, instructed elders “to bring to pass the gathering of mine elect” who would “be gathered in unto one place, upon the face of this land...

View Glossary
to this place. It is well  known that there were lands belong ing to the government, to be sold to in dividuals; and it was understood by all,  at least we believed so, that we lived in  a free country, a land of liberty and of  laws, guaranteeing to every man, or  any company of men, the right of pur chasing lands, and settling, and living  upon them: therefore we thought no  harm in advising the Latter Day  Saints

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
, or Mormons, as they are re proachfully called, to gather to this  place, inasmuch as it was their duty,  (and it was well understood so to be,)  to purchase, with money, lands, and  live upon them—not infringing upon  the civil rights of any individual, or  community of people: always keeping  in view the saying, “Do unto others as  you would wish to have others do unto  you.” Following also the good in junction: “Deal justly, love mercy,  and walk humbly with thy God.”
These were our motives in teaching  the people, or Latter Day Saints, to  gather together, beginning at this place.  And inasmuch as there are those who  have had different views from this, we  feel, that it is a cause of deep regret:  For, be it known unto all men, that  our principles concerning this thing,  have not been such as have been repre sented by those who, we have every rea son to believe, are designing and wick ed men, that have said that this was  our doctrine:—to infringe upon the  rights of a people who inhabit our civil  and free country: such as to drive the  inhabitants of Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
from  their lands, and take possession thereof  unlawfully. Far, yea, far be such a  principle from our hearts: it never en tered into our mind, and we only say,  that God shall reward such in that day  when he shall come to make up his jewels.
But to return to my subject: after  having ascertained the very spot, and  having the happiness of seeing quite a  number of the families of my brethren,  comfortably situated upon the land, I  took leave of them, and journeyed back  to Ohio

French explored area, 1669. British took possession following French and Indian War, 1763. Ceded to U.S., 1783. First permanent white settlement established, 1788. Northeastern portion maintained as part of Connecticut, 1786, and called Connecticut Western...

More Info
, and used every influence and  argument, that lay in my power, to get  those who believe in the everlasting  covenant

Generally referred to the “fulness of the gospel”—the sum total of the church’s message, geared toward establishing God’s covenant people on the earth; also used to describe individual elements of the gospel, including marriage. According to JS, the everlasting...

View Glossary
, whose circumstances woulp [would]  admit, and whose families were willing  to remove to the place which I now de signated to be the land of Zion: And  thus the sound of the gathering, and of  the doctrine, went abroad into the world;  and many we have reason to fear, hav ing a zeal not according to knowledge,  not understanding the pure principles  of the doctrine of the church, have no  doubt, in the heat of enthusiasm, taught  and said many things which are derog atory to the genuine character and  principles of the church, and for these  things we are heartily sorry, and would  apologize if an apology would do any  good.
But we pause here and offer a re mark upon the saying which we learn  has gone abroad, and has been handled  in a manner detrimental to the cause  of truth, by saying, “that in preaching  the doctrine of gathering, we break up  families, and give license for men to  leave their families; women their hus bands; children their parents, and slaves  their masters, thereby deranging the  order, and breaking up the harmony  and peace of society.” We shall here  show our faith, and thereby, as we  humbly trust, put an end to these faults [false],  and wicked misrepresentations, which  have caused, we have every reason to  believe, thousands to think they were  doing God’s service, when they were  persecuting the children of God: where as, if they could have enjoyed the true  light, and had a just understanding of  our principles, they would have embra ced them with all their hearts, and been  rejoicing in the love of the truth.
And now to show our doctrine on  this subject, we shall commence with  the first principles of the gospel, which  are repentance, and baptism for the re mission of sins

An ordinance in which an individual is immersed in water for the remission of sins. The Book of Mormon explained that those with necessary authority were to baptize individuals who had repented of their sins. Baptized individuals also received the gift of...

View Glossary
, and the gift of the Ho ly Ghost by the laying on of the hands

A practice in which individuals place their hands upon a person to bestow the gift of the Holy Ghost, ordain to an office or calling, or confer other power, authority, or blessings, often as part of an ordinance. The Book of Mormon explained that ecclesiastical...

View Glossary
.  This we believe to be our duty, to teach  to all mankind the doctrine of repent ance, which we shall endeavor to show  from the following quotations:
“Then opened he their understanding, that  they might understand the scriptures, and  said unto them, thus it is written, and thus it  behoved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the  dead, the third day; and that repentance and  remission of sins should be preached in his  name among all nations, beginning at Jerusa lem.”—Luke 24:45,46,47.
By this we learn, that it behoved  Christ to suffer, and to be crucified,  and rise again on the third day, for the  express purpose that repentance and [p. 180]
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JS, Letter, Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, OH, to the elders of the church, 2 Oct. 1835; Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, Sept. 1835, pp. 179–182.

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