53991682

Letterbook 2

JS and Hyrum Smith to Saints in Kirtland • 19 October 1840

Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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Hancock County, Ill
Oct 19th 1840
To the Saints in
Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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Ohio
Dearly beloved brethren in the Kingdom and patience of Jesus Christ.
We take this opportunity of informing you that we yet remember the saints scattered abroad in the regions of Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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& feel interested in their welfare as well as in that of the Saints at large.
We have beheld with feelings peculiar to ourselves the situation of things in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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and the numerous difficulties to which the Saints have been subjected by false friends as well as open enemies. All these circumstances have more or less engaged our attention from time to time.
We likewise must complain of the brethren who are in the office and authority in the Stake

The ecclesiastical organization of church members in a particular locale. Stakes were typically large local organizations of church members; stake leaders could include a presidency, a high council, and a bishopric. Some revelations referred to stakes “to...

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of Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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for not writing to us and making known their difficulties and their affairs from time to time so that they might be advised in matters of importance to the well being of said stake; but above all, for not sending one word of consolation to us while we were in the hands of our enemies— and thrust into dungeons.
Some of our friends from various sections sent us letters which breathed a kind and sympathetick spirit, and which made our afflictions and sufferings [en]durable. All was silent as the grave no feelings of sorrow sympathy or affection to cheer the heart under the gloomy shades of affliction and trouble through which we had to pass.
Dear brethren could you realize that your brethren were thus circumstancial and were to bear up under the weight of affliction and woe which was heaped upon them by their enemies and you stand unmoved and unconcerned!!! Where were the bowels of compassion Where was the love which ought to characterize the saints of the most high, did those high born and noble feelings lie dormant, or were you insensible to the treatment we received.
However, we are disposed to leave [p. 188]

JS and Hyrum Smith to Saints in Kirtland • 19 October 1840

Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

More Info
Hancock County, Ill
Oct 19th 1840
To the Saints in
Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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Ohio
Dearly beloved brethren in the Kingdom  and patience of Jesus Christ.
We take this opportunity of informing you that we yet  remember the saints scattered abroad in the regions of Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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&  feel interested in their welfare as well as in that of the Saints  at large.
We have beheld with feelings peculiar to ourselves the  situation of things in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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and the numerous difficul ties to which the Saints have been subjected by false friends  as well as open enemies. All these circumstances have more  or less engaged our attention from time to time.
We likewise must complain of the stake of  Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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for not writing to us the brethren who are in the office  and authority in the Stake

The ecclesiastical organization of church members in a particular locale. Stakes were typically large local organizations of church members; stake leaders could include a presidency, a high council, and a bishopric. Some revelations referred to stakes “to...

View Glossary
of Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
for not writing to  us and making known their difficulties and their affairs  from time to time so that they might be advised in matters  of importance to the well being of said stake; but above  all, for not sending one word of consolation to us while we  were in the hands of our enemies— and thrust into dungeons.
Some of our friends from various sections sent  us letters which breathed a kind and sympathetick spirit,  and which made our afflictions and sufferings [en]durable.  All was silent as the grave no feelings of sorrow sympathy  or affection to cheer the heart under the gloomy shades of  affliction and trouble through which we had to pass.
Dear brethren could you realize that your  brethren were thus circumstancial and were to bear up  under the weight of affliction and woe which was heaped  upon them by their enemies and you stand unmoved  and unconcerned!!! Where were the bowels of comp assion Where was the love which ought to characterize  the saints of the most high, did those high born and  noble feelings lie dormant, or were you insensible to  the treatment we received.
However, we are disposed to leave [p. 188]
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Letterbook 2, [1839–ca. summer 1843]; handwriting of Howard Coray

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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, James Mulholland

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, Robert B. Thompson

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, Willard Richards

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, John Fullmer

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, William Clayton

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, and George Walker; 238 leaves, 245 pages of letters, plus 26 pages of index and 83 pages of company records for Rigdon, Smith, & Co.; JS Collection, CHL.
Note: This book was originally used as a ledger, then turned over and repurposed as a letterbook. The ledger portion will be posted on this website at a later date.

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