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License for Edward Partridge, circa 4 August 1831–circa 5 January 1832

License for Edward Partridge, circa 4 August 1831–circa 5 January 1832

The church of Jesus christ To all to whom these  presents may come hereby testifyeth That our  beloved brother Edward Partridge has been app ointed Bishop of this church on the fourth of  February one thousand eight hundred and thirty one  with and by the consent of the whole church  agreeable to the appointment of God and orda ined to this office under the hand of Sidney  Rigdon an Elder of this church of christ  regularly organized on the sixth of April one thou sand eight hundred and thirty in wittness  whereof we have here unto set our hands
Sidney Rigdon{Elders
Joseph Smith Jr
Oliver Cowdery
Names of Elders

“Names of Elders” in handwriting of Sidney Rigdon. Three columns are drawn for the signatures. It is evident from an examination of the original document that Rigdon, JS, and those who followed them in signing the document began signing it on the rightmost portion of the page, in the third column. When the signatures reached the bottom of the page, William E. McLellin began a new column of signatures—the leftmost column—to the left of the first signatures.  

 
William W. Phelps
Wm. E, McLel[l]inMartin Harris
Harv[e]y WhitlockIsaac Morley
David WhitmerPeter Whitmer Jr
John CorrillSidney Gilbert
Samuel DrollingerJoseph Coe
Peter DustinSimeo[n]. Carter
Asa DoddsHyrum Smith
Orson Pratt
John Whitmer
[p. [1]]
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This document proclaims Edward Partridge’s appointment as bishop, with the “consent of the whole church,” on 4 February 1831. It includes twenty signatures of attestation and was composed at a 4 August 1831 conference, when most of the signatories gathered in Missouri. This document is likely the recommend that Partridge was commanded to obtain in a revelation dated 6 June 1831.
Sidney Rigdon prepared this license, or recommend, for Partridge. JS and eight others apparently signed it on 4 August. Seven others probably signed it at a 24 August conference and the last four by early 1832.

Facts