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Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845

and when the good spirit is the least agitated the evil one strives for the entire mastery and sets the good spirit to fluttering just ready to leave you because it has so slight a foothold. But you have been sick a long time and you know not what you will live Many years do you not wish to know something about Your Saviour before you are called to meet him She said She did. Well continued I there is another thing these men are clothed with the Authority of the everlasting Preisthood through which you may receive [a] blessing should they come and it is my wish to have them invited to breakfast— furthermore if you refuse to receive my brethren into your house I shall leave it and go myself to the tavern She finally concluded to have a sumptuous dinner prepared and have the brethren all invited to dine with her * * meanwhile they appled for the Methodist church to preach in but was refused The minister came the next morning and said that if he had known it to be the request of Gen [Stephen] Mack’s sister

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

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they should have preached in his church I told him there might yet be an oportunity for him to show his good will to us the necessary directions being given I told her that I would like to have her calm her mind as much as possible when the Elders came and after the ceremony of introduction &c was over have them lay hands on her and pray for her to this she consented and it was done after dinner she went to her room again being a little fatigued— I asked her if She wished them to pray for her again She answered very readily that she did for she had been better since they administered to her they complied with her request and bidding her farewell left the house after they were gone and she found that they were not to be there again she seemed to be very much distressed because She had not urged them to stay and preach the next morning I set out in the stage for Pontiac whither the brethren had gone the day before as my brothers Stephens wife and her soninlaw and Daughter Mr and Mrs Whitermore as soon as I had settled myself at Mr Whitermore’s I broached the subject which lay nearest my heart and began to explain to them why it was that [p. [12], bk. 12]
and when the good spirit is the least agitated the evil  one strives for the entire mastery and sets the good  spirit to f[l]uttering but just ready to leave you because  it has so slight a foothold. But you have been sick  a long time and you know not what you will live  long Many years do you not wish to know something  about Your Saviour before you a are called to meet him  She said She did. Well continued I there is another thing  these men are clothed with <the> Authority of the everlasting Preisthood  and it may be a <through which you may receive> [a] blessing <should they come> to you to have them come here  and it is my wish to have them invited to breakfast—  She fu furthermore if you refuse to receive my brethren into  your house I shall leave it and go myself to the tavern  She finally concluded to have a sumptuous dinner prep ared and have the brethren all invited to dine with her <*> <* meanwhile they appled for the Methodist church to preach in but was refused  The minister came the next morning and said that if he had known it to be the  request of Gen [Stephen] Mack’s sister

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

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they should have preached in his church  I told him there might yet be an oportunity for him to show his good will to us>  <the> necessary directions being given I told her that I would  like to have her calm her mind as much as possible and  when the Elders came and after she the ceremony of introdu ction &c was over have them lay hands on her and pray  for her to this she consented and and it was done  after dinner she went to her room again being a little fati gued— I asked her if She would like wished them to pray  for her again She answered very readily that she did  for she had been better since they administered to her  the they complied with her request and bidding her fare well left the house after they were gone and she fou nd that they were not to be there again she seemed  to be very much distressed because She had not  urged them to stay and preach but the next mor ning I set out in the stage for Pontiac whither the bret hren had gone the day before as my brothers Stephens wife  and her soninlaw and Daughter Mr and Mrs Whitermore  as soon as I had settled myself at Mr Whitermore’s I commenc ed broached the subject which lay nearest my heart and  which I felt the began to e[x]plain to them why it was that [p. [12], bk. 12]
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Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845; handwriting of Martha Jane Knowlton Coray and Howard Coray

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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; 240 pages, with miscellaneous inserted pages; CHL.
Note: Lucy Mack Smith

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

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, the mother of Joseph Smith, dictated this rough draft version of her history to Martha Jane Knowlton Coray (with some additional scribal help from Martha’s husband, Howard

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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) beginning in 1844 and concluding in 1845. In 1845, the Corays inscribed a fair copy of the history under Lucy’s direction.

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