53991845

Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

interposed in our behalf, to save us from their wicked purposes. We were also subjected to the necessity of eating human flesh for the space of 5 days or go without food, except a little coffee or a little corn bread— the latter I chose in preference to the former. We none of us partook of the flesh except Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
— we also heard the guard which was placed over us, making sport of us, saying that they ‘had fed us on Mormon beef.’ I have described the appearance of this flesh to several experienced physicians, and they have decided that it was human flesh. We learned afterwards by one of the guard that it was supposed that this act of savage caniblalism, in feeding us with human flesh, would be considered a popular deed of notoriety; but the people on learning that it would not take, tried to keep it a secret; but the fact was noised abroad before they took that precaution. Whilst we were incarcerated in prison, we petitioned the supreme court of the state of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
; for Habeus Corpus, twice; but were refused both times by Judge [Thomas] Reynolds

12 Mar. 1796–9 Feb. 1844. Attorney, politician, judge. Born at Mason Co. (later Bracken Co.), Kentucky. Son of Nathaniel Reynolds and Catherine Vernon. Admitted to Kentucky bar, 1817. Moved to Illinois, by 1818. Served as clerk of Illinois House of Representatives...

View Full Bio
, who is now the Governor of that state

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
. We also petitioned one of the County Judges for a writ of habeus corpus, which was granted in about 3 weeks afterwards; but were not permitted to have any trial— we were only taken out of jail and kept out a few hours, and then remanded back again. In the course of three or four days after that time, Judge [Joel] Turnham

23 Sept. 1783–24 Aug. 1862. Judge, farmer. Born in Virginia. Married Elizabeth Rice, ca. Feb. 1806, in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Moved to Jessamine Co., Kentucky, by 1810. Served in War of 1812 in Kentucky militia. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1822. Clay...

View Full Bio
came into jail in the evening and said that he had permitted Mr. Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
to get bail; but said he had to do it in the night, and he had also to get away in the night, and unknown to any of the citizens, or they would kill him for they had sworn to kill him if they if they could find him: and as to the rest of us, he dared not let us go, for fear of his own life, as well as ours. He said it was damned hard to be confined under such circumstances; for he knew we were innocent men, and he said the people also knew it; and that it was only a perscution and a treachery, and the scenes of Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
acted over again. for fear that we would become too numerous in that upper Country. He said the [p. 273]
interposed in our behalf, to save us from their wicked purposes.  We were also subjected to the necessity of eating human flesh for the  space of 5 days or go without food, except a little coffee or a  little corn bread— the latter I chose in preference to the former . We none of us partook of the flesh except Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
— we also  heard the guard which was placed over us, making sport of us,  saying that they ‘had fed us on Mormon beef.’ I have descri bed the appearance of this flesh to several experienced physicians,  and they have decided that it was human flesh. We learned aft erwards by one of the guard that <it was supposed that> this act of savage caniblalism,  in feeding us with human flesh, would be considered a popular deed  of notoriety; but the people on learning that it would not take,  tried to keep it a secret; but the fact was noised abroad before  they took that precaution. Whilst we were incarcerated in prison,  we petitioned the supreme court of the state of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
; for Habeus  Corpus, twice; but were refused both times by Judge [Thomas] Reynolds

12 Mar. 1796–9 Feb. 1844. Attorney, politician, judge. Born at Mason Co. (later Bracken Co.), Kentucky. Son of Nathaniel Reynolds and Catherine Vernon. Admitted to Kentucky bar, 1817. Moved to Illinois, by 1818. Served as clerk of Illinois House of Representatives...

View Full Bio
, who is  now the Governor of that state

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
. We also petitioned one of the Count try County Judges for a writ of habeus corpus, which was granted in ab out 3 weeks afterwards; but were not permitted to have any trial—  we were only taken out of jail and kept out a few hours,  and then remanded back again. In the course of three or four  days after that time, Judge [Joel] Turnham

23 Sept. 1783–24 Aug. 1862. Judge, farmer. Born in Virginia. Married Elizabeth Rice, ca. Feb. 1806, in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Moved to Jessamine Co., Kentucky, by 1810. Served in War of 1812 in Kentucky militia. Moved to Clay Co., Missouri, by 1822. Clay...

View Full Bio
came into jail in the ev ening and said that he had permitted Mr. Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
to get bail;  but said he had to do it in the night, and he had also to get  away in the night, and unknown to any of the citizens, or  they would kill him for they had sworn to kill him if they  if they could find him: and as to the rest of us, he dared not  let us go, for fear of his own life, as well as ours. He said it was  damned hard to be confined under such circumstances; for he kne w we were innocent men, and he said the people also knew it;  and that it was only a perscution and a treachery, and the scenes  of Jackson county

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
acted over again. for fear that we would  become too numerous in that upper County Country. He said the [p. 273]
PreviousNext
Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845; handwriting of Howard Coray

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

View Full Bio
and Martha Jane Knowlton Coray; 337 pages; CHL.
Note: Lucy Mack Smith

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

View Full Bio
, the mother of Joseph Smith, dictated a rough draft version of her history to Martha Jane Knowlton Coray (with some additional scribal help from Martha’s husband, Howard

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

View Full Bio
) beginning in 1844 and concluding in 1845. In 1845, the Corays inscribed this fair copy of the history under Lucy’s direction.

Facts