53991845

Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

Wilson

1795–ca. 1868. Farmer, merchant, land developer, postmaster. Born in Virginia. Moved to Greene Co., Tennessee, by Dec. 1818. Married first Margaret Guin, 23 Dec. 1829, in Greene Co. Moved to Pike Co., Illinois, by Apr. 1832. Served in Black Hawk War, 1832...

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left the company, rather crest-fallen.
In the course of the conversation, Wilson

1795–ca. 1868. Farmer, merchant, land developer, postmaster. Born in Virginia. Moved to Greene Co., Tennessee, by Dec. 1818. Married first Margaret Guin, 23 Dec. 1829, in Greene Co. Moved to Pike Co., Illinois, by Apr. 1832. Served in Black Hawk War, 1832...

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said, that the best plan was, to rush into the Mormon settlement, murder the men, make slaves of the children, take possession of the property, and use the women as they pleased.
There was a gentleman present from Baltimore, (Maryland): he said he never was among such a pack of damned savages before; that he had passed through Far-West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, and saw nothing among the Mormons but good order. Then drawing his pistols, he discharged them; and reloding he said; “if God spares my life till I get out of upper Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, I will never be found associating with such devils again.”
Soon after this we were invited to preach on board of the boat.— Elder Barnes gave them a good lecture, and I bore testimony: the rest of the way we were treated more civilly; but being deck passengers, and having very little money, we suffered much for food. On one occasion we paid 12½ cents for a dozen ears of corn:— and after grating it we paid a woman 12½ cents more for baking it into bread, although it was badly done, being neither sifted nor the whole kernels taken out; yet, we were so hungry that we were glad to get it.
We continued our journey together through every species of hardship and fatigue, until the 11th of October; when elder Barnes and H. Sagers left us, after giving them all the money we had: they starting for Cincinatti Cincinnati

Area settled largely by emigrants from New England and New Jersey, by 1788. Village founded and surveyed adjacent to site of Fort Washington, 1789. First seat of legislature of Northwest Territory, 1790. Incorporated as city, 1819. Developed rapidly as shipping...

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, and we to visit the churches in West Tennessee. Soon after this Julian Moses, who fell in company with us on the [p. 321]
Wilson

1795–ca. 1868. Farmer, merchant, land developer, postmaster. Born in Virginia. Moved to Greene Co., Tennessee, by Dec. 1818. Married first Margaret Guin, 23 Dec. 1829, in Greene Co. Moved to Pike Co., Illinois, by Apr. 1832. Served in Black Hawk War, 1832...

View Full Bio
left the company, rather crest-fallen.
In the course of the conversation, Wilson

1795–ca. 1868. Farmer, merchant, land developer, postmaster. Born in Virginia. Moved to Greene Co., Tennessee, by Dec. 1818. Married first Margaret Guin, 23 Dec. 1829, in Greene Co. Moved to Pike Co., Illinois, by Apr. 1832. Served in Black Hawk War, 1832...

View Full Bio
said,  that the best plan was, to rush into the Mormon settle ment, murder the men, make slaves of the children,  take possession of the property, and use the women  as they pleased.
There was a gentleman present from Baltimore,  (Maryland): he said he never was among such  a pack of damned savages before; that he had  passed through Far-West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, and saw nothing among  the Mormons but good order. Then drawing his  pistols, he discharged them; and reloding he said;  “if God spares my life till I get out of upper Misso uri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, I will never be found associating with such  devils again.”
Soon after this we were invited to preach on board  of the boat.— Elder Barnes gave them a good lec ture, and I bore testimony: the rest of the way  we were treated more civilly; but being deck pas sengers, and having very little money, we suffered  much for food. On one occasion we paid 12½  cents for a dozen ears of corn:— and after grating  it we paid a woman 12½ cents more for baking  it into bread, although it was badly done, being  neither sifted nor the whole kernels taken out; yet,  we were so hungry that we were glad to get it.
We continued our journey together through every  species of hardship and fatigue, until the 11th  of October; when elder Barnes and H. Sagers left  us, after giving them all the money we had: they  starting for Cincinatti [Cincinnati]

Area settled largely by emigrants from New England and New Jersey, by 1788. Village founded and surveyed adjacent to site of Fort Washington, 1789. First seat of legislature of Northwest Territory, 1790. Incorporated as city, 1819. Developed rapidly as shipping...

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, and we to visit the chu rches in West Tennessee. Soon after this Juli an Moses, who fell in company with us on the [p. 321]
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Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845; handwriting of Howard Coray

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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and Martha Jane Knowlton Coray; 337 pages; CHL.
Note: Lucy Mack Smith

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

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, the mother of Joseph Smith, dictated a rough draft version of her history to Martha Jane Knowlton Coray (with some additional scribal help from Martha’s husband, Howard

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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) beginning in 1844 and concluding in 1845. In 1845, the Corays inscribed this fair copy of the history under Lucy’s direction.

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