53991845

Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

travel, he went with his uncle Jesse Smith to Salem for the benefit of his health, hoping the sea-breezes would be of service to him; and in this he was not disappointed.
After about a year of sickness and distress, health again returned to our family; and we indeed realized the blessing, and felt to acknowledge the hand of God, more in preserving our lives through such a tremendous scene of affliction, than had we seen nothing but health and prosperity, in the same time.
 

Chapter 17

Chap. 17.
 
Joseph Smith Sen.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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moves to Norwichthence to Palmira Palmyra

First permanent white settlers arrived, ca. 1789. Included village of Palmyra. Erie Canal opened, 1825, in southern portion of township. Population in 1810 about 2,200. Population in 1830 about 3,400. Home of Joseph Sr. and Lucy Mack Smith family, beginning...

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his dream of the Imagesof the Judgment.
 
When health returned to our family, as one would naturally suppose, it found us in quite low circumstances: and we were compelled to strain every energy to provide for our present necessities, instead of making arrangements for the future; as we had previously contemplated.
Shortly after sickness left us, we moved to Norwich, in the state of Vermont

Area served as early thoroughfare for traveling Indian tribes. French explored area, 1609, and erected fort on island in Lake Champlain, 1666. First settled by Massachusetts emigrants, 1724. Claimed by British colonies of New York and New Hampshire, but during...

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. Here we establised ourselves on a farm, belonging to one Esq Moredock. The first year our crops failed. Yet, by selling fruit that grew on the place, we obtained bread for the family; and thus we were enabled,, by making considerable exertion, to sustain ourselves. [p. 63]
travel, he went with his uncle Jesse Smith to Salem for  the benefit of his health, hoping the sea-breezes  would be of service <to him>; and in this he was not dis appointed.
After about a year of sickness and distress, hea lth again returned to our family; and we indeed  realized the blessing, and felt to acknowledge the  hand of God, more in preserving our lives through  such a tremendous scene of affliction, than had  we seen nothing but health and prosperity, in the  same time.
 

Chapter 17

Chap. 17.
 
Joseph Smith Sen.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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moves to Norwichthence to Palmira [Palmyra]

First permanent white settlers arrived, ca. 1789. Included village of Palmyra. Erie Canal opened, 1825, in southern portion of township. Population in 1810 about 2,200. Population in 1830 about 3,400. Home of Joseph Sr. and Lucy Mack Smith family, beginning...

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 his dream of the Imagesof the Judgment.
 
When [illegible] health returned to our family, as one  would naturally suppose, it found us in quite  low circumstances: and <we> were compelled to strain every  energy to provide for our present necessities, with that instead of  making arrangements for the future; as we had pre viously contemplated.
Shortly after sickness left us, we moved to Nor wich, in the state of Vermont

Area served as early thoroughfare for traveling Indian tribes. French explored area, 1609, and erected fort on island in Lake Champlain, 1666. First settled by Massachusetts emigrants, 1724. Claimed by British colonies of New York and New Hampshire, but during...

More Info
. Here we establised  ourselves on a farm, belonging to one Esq Moredock.  The first year our crops failed. Yet, by selling fruit  that grew on the place, we obtained bread for the  family; and thus <we were enabled,>, by making considerable exertion, we  were enabled to sustain ourselves. [p. 63]
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Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845; handwriting of Howard Coray

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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and Martha Jane Knowlton Coray; 337 pages; CHL.
Note: Lucy Mack Smith

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

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, the mother of Joseph Smith, dictated a rough draft version of her history to Martha Jane Knowlton Coray (with some additional scribal help from Martha’s husband, Howard

6 May 1817–16 Jan. 1908. Bookkeeper, clerk, teacher, farmer. Born in Dansville, Steuben Co., New York. Son of Silas Coray and Mary Stephens. Moved to Providence, Luzerne Co., Pennsylvania, ca. 1827; to Williams, Northampton Co., Pennsylvania, by 1830; and...

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) beginning in 1844 and concluding in 1845. In 1845, the Corays inscribed this fair copy of the history under Lucy’s direction.

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