31593

Minute Book 2

understand they have been greatly damaged since taken, and at this time probably would not bring near their former value; and as they were both here and in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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taken by the Militia; and consequently by the authority of of the State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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; we therefore, ask your Honerable Body to cause an appropriation to be made by law, whereby we may be paid for them; or otherwise have them returned to us, and the damages made good.
The loss sustained by our people, in leaving Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, are so situated, that it is impossible to obtain any compensation for them by law, because those who have sustained them them are unable to prove those trespasses upon individuals.
That the facts do exist. that the buildings crops, stock, furniture, rails, timber &c. of the society have been destroyed in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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, is not doubted by any at this time acquainted in this upper country; and since those trespasses cannot be proved upon individuals, we ask your Honorable Body to consider this case; and if in your liberality and wisdom, you can conceive to be proper, and make an appropriation by law to compensate those sufferers.— The State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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we think would never feel the loss, whereas those sufferers, many of whom, are still pressed down with poverty, in consequence of those losses, would be enabled to pay their debts, and also in some degree relieved from poverty and woe, whilst the widow’s heart would be made to rejoice & the orphan’s tear measureably dried up; and the prayer of a grateful people ascend on High, with thanksgiving and praise to the author of our existance for that beneficient act.—
In laying our case before your Honorable Body, we say that we are willing and ever have been to conform to the Constitution and laws of the United

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

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[p. 172]
understand they have been greatly damaged since taken, and  at this time probably would not bring near their former  value; and as they were both here and in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
 taken by the Militia; and consequently by the authority of  of the State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
; we therefore, ask your Honerable Body to  cause an appropriation to be made by law, whereby we  may be paid for them; or otherwise have them returned  to us, and the damages made good.
The loss sustained by our people, in leaving  Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
, are so situated, that it is impossible to  obtain any compensation for them by law, because those  who have sustained them them are unable to prove those  trespasses upon individuals.
That the facts do exist. that the buildings  crops, stock, furniture, rails, timber &c. of the society  have been destroyed in Jackson County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
, is not doubted  by any at this time acquainted in this upper country;  and since those trespasses cannot be proved upon  individuals, we ask your Honorable Body to consider  this case; and if in your liberality and wisdom, you can  conceive to be proper, and make an appropriation by law to  compensate those sufferers.— The State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
we think would never  feel the loss, whereas those sufferers, many of whom, are  still pressed down with poverty, in consequence of  those losses, would be enabled to pay their debts, and  also in some degree relieved from poverty and woe,  whilst the widow’s heart would be made to rejoice &  the orphan’s tear measureably dried up; and the  prayer of a grateful people ascend on High, with  thanksgiving and praise to the author of our existance for  that beneficient act.—
In laying our case before your Honorable  Body, we say that we are willing and ever have been  to conform to the Constitution and laws of the United

North American constitutional republic. Constitution ratified, 17 Sept. 1787. Population in 1805 about 6,000,000; in 1830 about 13,000,000; and in 1844 about 20,000,000. Louisiana Purchase, 1803, doubled size of U.S. Consisted of seventeen states at time ...

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[p. 172]
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Zion

JS revelation, dated 20 July 1831, designated Missouri as “land of promise” for gathering of Saints and place for “city of Zion,” with Independence area as “center place” of Zion. Latter-day Saint settlements elsewhere, such as in Kirtland, Ohio, became known...

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(Missouri) High Council and Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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Stake High Council, “The Conference Minutes, and Record Book, of Christ’s Church of Latter Day Saints,” Minute Book 2, 6 Apr. 1838–[ca. June 1838], [ca. Oct. 1842], [ca. June 1844]; handwriting of Ebenezer Robinson

25 May 1816–11 Mar. 1891. Printer, editor, publisher. Born at Floyd (near Rome), Oneida Co., New York. Son of Nathan Robinson and Mary Brown. Moved to Utica, Oneida Co., ca. 1831, and learned printing trade at Utica Observer. Moved to Ravenna, Portage Co....

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, Hosea Stout, Levi Richards

14 Apr. 1799–18 June 1876. Teacher, mechanic, inventor, physician. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Baptized into LDS church, 31 Dec. 1836, in Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained a high priest, Dec. ...

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, Joseph M. Cole, and an unidentified scribe; 178 pages, as well as indexing in tabbed pages at beginning of book; CHL. Includes tables, redactions, use marks, and archival marking.
The second of two texts inscribed in a ledger book. The paper, which is ruled both horizontally and vertically, measures 12½ × 7¾ inches (32 × 20 cm). The book contains 276 leaves, including the flyleaves in the front and back of the book. The bound book, which features a brown suede leather cover, measures 13 × 8½ × 1¾ inches (33 × 22 × 4 cm). The spine has a pasted red label with “LEDGER” in gold lettering. Following the four front flyleaves, the first twenty-four pages are tabbed index pages. The next seventy-three pages were used by Warren Parrish

10 Jan. 1803–3 Jan. 1877. Clergyman, gardener. Born in New York. Son of John Parrish and Ruth Farr. Married first Elizabeth (Betsey) Patten of Westmoreland Co., New Hampshire, ca. 1822. Lived at Alexandria, Jefferson Co., New York, 1830. Purchased land at...

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for various financial accounts he kept prior to his move to Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio. Following a blank page, Minute Book 2 fills the next 187 pages, although there are some blank pages within and at the end of this record. The portion of the ledger in which Minute Book 2 is inscribed has its own pagination, all apparently done by Hosea Stout. Ebenezer Robinson

25 May 1816–11 Mar. 1891. Printer, editor, publisher. Born at Floyd (near Rome), Oneida Co., New York. Son of Nathan Robinson and Mary Brown. Moved to Utica, Oneida Co., ca. 1831, and learned printing trade at Utica Observer. Moved to Ravenna, Portage Co....

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’s handwriting appears on the title page (the recto of the leaf preceding page 1) and on pages 1–37, 41–42, 44–52, and 55–93. Pages 38–40 are blank. Levi Richards

14 Apr. 1799–18 June 1876. Teacher, mechanic, inventor, physician. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Joseph Richards and Rhoda Howe. Baptized into LDS church, 31 Dec. 1836, in Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Ordained a high priest, Dec. ...

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’s handwriting appears on pages 43 and 52–55. There is also unidentified handwriting in the middle of page 87. The inscription ends with minutes of the Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, Illinois, stake high council meetings held 1 and 15 June 1844, recorded by Joseph M. Cole on pages 178–185. The minutes were recorded with a quill pen, and all are in brown ink, except for some blue ink on pages 179–181. The remaining 251 pages of the book are blank. There were originally four back flyleaves; only two remain, and they are blank.
Minute Book 2 includes several redactions made in graphite, as well as some marking in blue pencil. The leather cover was decorated with blind tooling at some point, and a paper sticker was pasted on the spine with “CONFERENCE MINUTES AND HIGH COUNCIL RECORDS OF FAR WEST” inscribed in unidentified handwriting. This sticker resembles several other such stickers found on early church record books.
The volume may have been included in the Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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exodus inventory as part of “Records of High Council.” It is listed in middle- and late-nineteenth-century inventories of the Historian’s Office in Salt Lake City. The Historian’s Office apparently made a microfilm copy of the volume in 1954. Church historian Joseph Fielding Smith took the volume with him to the Office of the First Presidency when he became church president in 1970 and kept it in his safe. The book was returned to the Church History Department in 2008. These archival records and archival marking on the book indicate continuous institutional custody.

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