53992497

Minutes, 1–5 October 1841

This doctrine appears glorious, inasmuch as it exhibits the greatness of divine compassion and benevolence in the extent of the plan of human salvation. This glorious truth is well calculated to enlarge the understanding, and to sustain the soul under troubles, difficulties, and distresses.
For illustration the speaker presented, by supposition, the case of too men, brothers, equally intelligent, learned, virtuous and lovely, walking in uprightness and in all good conscience, so far as they had been able to discern duty from the muddy stream of tradition, or from the blotted page of the book of nature. One dies, and is buried, having never heard the gospel of reconciliation: to the other the message of salvation is sent, he hears and embraces it, and is made the heir of eternal life. Shall the one become a partaker of glory, and the other be consigned to hopeless perdition? Is there no chance for his escape? Sectarianism answers, “none! none!! none!!!” Such an idea is worse than atheism. The truth shall break down and dash in pieces all such bigoted Pharisaism; the sects shall be sifted, the honest in heart brought out and their priests left in the midst of their corruption. The speaker then answered the objections urged against the Latter Day Saints for not admitting the validity of sectarian baptism, and for withholding fellowship from sectarian churches. It was like putting new wine into old bottles and putting old wine into new bottles. What, new revelations in the old churches! New revelatiens knock out the bottom of their bottomless pit. New wine into old bottles!—the bottles burst and the wine runs out. What, Sadducees in the new church! Old wine in new leathern bottles will leak through the pores and escape; so the Saddacee saints mock at authority, kick out of the traces, and run to the mountains of perdition, leaving the long echo of their braying behind them.
The speaker then contrasted the charity of the sects, in denouncing all who disagree with them in opinion, and in joining in persecuting the saints, with the faith of the saints, who believe that even such may be saved in this world and in the world to come, (murderers and apostates excepted.)
This doctrine, he said, presented in a clear light, the wisdom and mercy of God, in preparing an ordinance for the salvation of the dead, being baptised by proxy, their names recorded in heaven. and they judged according to the deeds done in the body. This doctrine was the burden of the scriptures. Those saints who neglect it, in behalf of their deceased relatives, do it at the peril of their own salvation.
The dispensation of the fulness of times will bring to light the things that have been revealed in all former dispensations, also other things that have not been before revealed. He shall send Elijah the prophet. &c., and restore all things in Christ.
The speaker then announced, “There shall be no more baptisms for the dead, until the ordinance can be attended to in the font of the Lord’s House;

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

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and the church shall not hold another general conference, until they can meet in said house

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

More Info
. For thus saith the Lord!
Closed by prayer by Pres. Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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—adjourned for one hour.
P. M. Conference opened by the choir singing Hymn 105, and prayer by Br. Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
.
Br. B. Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

View Full Bio
addressed the Elders at some length. on the importance of teaching abroad the first principles of the gospel, leaving the mysteries of the kingdom to be taught among the saints.
Also, on the propriety of the Elders, many of them, remaining at home, and working on the Lord’s House

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

More Info
; and that their labors will be as acceptable to the Lord as their going abroad, and more profitable for the church—that those who go abroad must take a recommend from the proper authorities, without which they will not be fellowshiped—and that those who go and those who remain make consecrations more abundantly than heretofore.
Br. Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
, followed with remarks of a similar purport; resigning his mission of gathering means for the buildings.
Br. B. Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

View Full Bio
called upon the conference to appoint a committee to petition Congress for redress of wrongs and injuries received in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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.
On Motion—Elias Higbee

23 Oct. 1795–8 June 1843. Clerk, judge, surveyor. Born at Galloway, Gloucester Co., New Jersey. Son of Isaac Higbee and Sophia Somers. Moved to Clermont Co., Ohio, 1803. Married Sarah Elizabeth Ward, 10 Sept. 1818, in Tate Township, Clermont Co. Lived at ...

View Full Bio
, John Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

View Full Bio
, and Elias Smith, were appointed said committee.
On Motion—Elder John Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

View Full Bio
was appointed to present said petition at the city of Washington

Created as district for seat of U.S. federal government by act of Congress, 1790, and named Washington DC, 1791. Named in honor of George Washington. Headquarters of executive, legislative, and judicial branches of U.S. government relocated to Washington ...

More Info
.
Closed by the choir singing hymn 125 and prayer by Elder John Smith

16 July 1781–23 May 1854. Farmer. Born at Derryfield (later Manchester), Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Member of Congregational Church. Appointed overseer of highways at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York, 1810. Married...

View Full Bio
. [p. 578]
This doctrine appears glorious, inas much as it exhibits the greatness of divine  compassion and benevolence in the ex tent of the plan of human salvation. This  glorious truth is well calculated to enlarge  the understanding, and to sustain the soul  under troubles, difficulties, and distresses.
For illustration the speaker presented,  by supposition, the case of too men, bro thers, equally intelligent, learned, virtu ous and lovely, walking in uprightness  and in all good conscience, so far as they  had been able to discern duty from the  muddy stream of tradition, or from the  blotted page of the book of nature. One  dies, and is buried, having never heard  the gospel of reconciliation: to the other  the message of salvation is sent, he hears  and embraces it, and is made the heir of  eternal life. Shall the one become a  partaker of glory, and the other be con signed to hopeless perdition? Is there  no chance for his escape? Sectarianism  answers, “none! none!! none!!!” Such  an idea is worse than atheism. The truth  shall break down and dash in pieces all  such bigoted Pharisaism; the sects shall  be sifted, the honest in heart brought out  and their priests left in the midst of their  corruption. The speaker then answer ed the objections urged against the Lat ter Day Saints for not admitting the va lidity of sectarian baptism, and for with holding fellowship from sectarian church es. It was like putting new wine into old  bottles and putting old wine into new bot tles. What, new revelations in the old  churches! New revelatiens knock out  the bottom of their bottomless pit. New  wine into old bottles!—the bottles burst  and the wine runs out. What, Saddu cees in the new church! Old wine in new  leathern bottles will leak through the pores  and escape; so the Saddacee saints mock  at authority, kick out of the traces, and  run to the mountains of perdition, leaving  the long echo of their braying behind  them.
The speaker then contrasted the char ity of the sects, in denouncing all who  disagree with them in opinion, and in  joining in persecuting t[h]e saints, with the  faith of the saints, who believe that even  such may be saved in this world and in  the world to come, (murderers and apos tates excepted.)
This doctrine, he said, presented in a  clear light, the wisdom and mercy of God,  in preparing an ordinance for the salva tion of the dead, being baptised by proxy,  their names recorded in heaven. and they  [j]udged according to the deeds done in the  body. This doctrine was the burden of  the scriptures. Those saints who neg lect it, in behalf of their deceased rela tives, do it at the peril of their own sal vation.
The dispensation of the fulness of times  will bring to light the things that have been  revealed in all former dispensations, also  other things that have not been before  revealed. He shall send Elijah the proph e[t]. &c., and restore all things in Christ.
The speaker then announced, “There  shall be no more baptisms for the dead,  until the ordinance can be attended to in  the font of the Lord’s House;

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

More Info
and the  church shall not hold another general con ference, until they can meet in said house

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

More Info
.  For thus saith the Lord!
Closed by prayer by Pres. Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
 —adjourned for one hour.
P. M. Conference opened by the ch[o]ir  singing Hymn 105, and prayer by Br.  Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
.
Br. B. Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

View Full Bio
addressed the Elders at  some length. on the importance of teach ing abroad the first principles of the gos pel, leaving the mysteries of the kingdom  to be taught among the saints.
Also, on the propriety of the Elders,  many of them, remaining at home, and  working on the Lord’s House

JS revelation, dated Jan. 1841, commanded Saints to build temple and hotel (Nauvoo House). Cornerstone laid, 6 Apr. 1841. Saints volunteered labor, money, and other resources for temple construction. Construction directed by committee, which included Reynolds...

More Info
; and that  their labors will be as acceptable to the  Lord as their going abroad, and more prof itable for the church—that those who go  abroad must take a recommend from the  proper authorities, without which they  will not be fellowshiped—and that those  who go and those who remain make con secrations more abundantly than hereto fore.
Br. Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

View Full Bio
, followed with re marks of a similar purport; resigning his  mission of gathering means for the build ings.
Br. B. Young

1 June 1801–29 Aug. 1877. Carpenter, painter, glazier, colonizer. Born at Whitingham, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Brought up in Methodist household; later joined Methodist church. Moved to Sherburne, Chenango Co., New...

View Full Bio
called upon the confer ence to appoint a committee to petition  Congress for redress of wrongs and inju ries received in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
.
On Motion—Elias Higbee

23 Oct. 1795–8 June 1843. Clerk, judge, surveyor. Born at Galloway, Gloucester Co., New Jersey. Son of Isaac Higbee and Sophia Somers. Moved to Clermont Co., Ohio, 1803. Married Sarah Elizabeth Ward, 10 Sept. 1818, in Tate Township, Clermont Co. Lived at ...

View Full Bio
, John Tay lor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

View Full Bio
, and Elias Smith, were appointed said  committee.
On Motion—Elder John Taylor

1 Nov. 1808–25 July 1887. Preacher, editor, publisher, politician. Born at Milnthorpe, Westmoreland Co., England. Son of James Taylor and Agnes Taylor, members of Church of England. Around age sixteen, joined Methodists and was local preacher. Migrated from...

View Full Bio
was  appointed to present said petition at the  city of Washington

Created as district for seat of U.S. federal government by act of Congress, 1790, and named Washington DC, 1791. Named in honor of George Washington. Headquarters of executive, legislative, and judicial branches of U.S. government relocated to Washington ...

More Info
.
Closed by the choir singing hymn 125  and prayer by Elder John Smith

16 July 1781–23 May 1854. Farmer. Born at Derryfield (later Manchester), Rockingham Co., New Hampshire. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Member of Congregational Church. Appointed overseer of highways at Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., New York, 1810. Married...

View Full Bio
. [p. 578]
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Minutes, Nauvoo

Principal gathering place for Saints following expulsion from Missouri. Beginning in 1839, LDS church purchased lands in earlier settlement of Commerce and planned settlement of Commerce City, as well as surrounding areas. Served as church headquarters, 1839...

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, IL, 1–5 Oct. 1841; in Times and Seasons, 15 Oct. 1841, 2:576–580.

Facts