31838

Minutes, 25–26 October 1831

Br. Edmund Durfee

3 Oct. 1788–15 Nov. 1845. Farmer, miller. Born in Tiverton, Newport Co., Rhode Island. Son of Perry Durfee and Annie Salisbury. Moved with grandparents to Broadalbin, Montgomery Co., New York, 1801. Married Magdalena Pickle, ca. 1810. Moved to Lenox, Madison...

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said that he had professed religion for a number of years yet now felt to bear testimony of the goodness of God, & also to consecrate

The dedicating of money, lands, goods, or one’s own life for sacred purposes. Both the New Testament and Book of Mormon referred to some groups having “all things common” economically; the Book of Mormon also referred to individuals who consecrated or dedicated...

View Glossary
all to the Lord.19

Durfee’s repetition of Joel Johnson’s remarks may be an error in transcription. In Minute Book 2, the Joel Johnson comment is at the bottom of page 12, while the Edmund Durfee comment is at the top of page 13. Ebenezer Robinson may have mistakenly transcribed the same statement for Durfee after beginning a new page.  


Br. Joseph Smith Sr.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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said that he had nothing to consecrate to the Lord of the things of the Earth, yet he felt to consecrate himself and family.20

At this time, Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack Smith were living on Frederick G. Williams’s farm. According to Lucy, “My family were all established with this arrangement that we were to cultivate the farm and the products were to support our several families . . . and sustain strange[r]s who were traveling that being either Members of the church or others in search of the truth or on a visit to the place.” Minutes from a 10 October 1831 conference record the decision that Joseph Smith Sr. was to “see to the management of the farm & to the distribution of its productions as the Lord’s agent.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845, bk. 12, [6]–[7]; Minute Book 2, 10 Oct. 1831.)  


Was thankful that God had given him a place among his Saints, felt willing to labor for their good.
Br. Luke Johnson

3 Nov. 1807–8 Dec. 1861. Farmer, teacher, doctor. Born at Pomfret, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of John Johnson and Alice (Elsa) Jacobs. Lived at Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, when baptized into LDS church by JS, 10 May 1831. Ordained a priest by Christian Whitmer...

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said that he was determined to be for God and none else come life or death, also remembered his covenant that he would consecrate all that he had to the Lord.
Br. Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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said that he thought best that the information of the coming forth of the book of Mormon be related by Joseph himself to the Elders

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
present that all might know for themselves.
Br. Joseph Smith jr. said that it was not intended to tell the world all the particulars of the coming forth of the book of Mormon, & also said that it was not expedient for him to relate these things &c.21

To this point, JS apparently had not written a history of the production of the Book of Mormon. In April 1834, he provided “a relation of obtaining and translating the Book of Mormon” to a conference in Norton, Ohio, though the conference minutes do not provide any other information about what he said. An account was finally published in 1842, but it gave few details. (Minute Book 1, 21 Apr. 1834; JS, “Church History,” Times and Seasons, 1 Mar. 1842, 3:707; see also “The Histories of Joseph Smith, 1832–1844.”)  


Br. Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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laid before the Conference the case of Sister Marsh & family who were somewhat destitute.22

“Sister Marsh” is likely Elizabeth Godkin Marsh. If so, Marsh’s dire financial situation may have resulted in part from her husband’s absence: Thomas B. Marsh was directed in a 6 June 1831 revelation to travel to Missouri and did not return to Ohio until January 1832. “While near the end of our journey” to Missouri, he later recalled, “I was attacked with chills and fever and arrived there very sick. I stayed at the house of Br. Benj. Slade till I got well.” (Revelation, 6 June 1831 [D&C 52:22] ; “T B Marsh,” [3], Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, ca. 1858–1880, CHL ; see also Cahoon, Diary, 9 Aug. 1831.)  


Br. Titus Billings

24 Mar. 1793–6 Feb. 1866. Stonemason, carpenter, musician. Born in Greenfield, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Ebenezer Billings and Esther Joyce. Moved to Mentor, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1817. Married Diantha Morley, 16 Feb. 1817, in Geauga Co. Moved to...

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said that he was surprised that the case of Sister Marsh should be brought to this Conference, as she and her family were provided for as well as her brethren around her.
Br Joseph Smith Jr said that he intended to do his duty before the Lord and hoped that the brethren would be patient, as they had a considerable distance. also said that the promise of God was that the greatest blessings which God had to bestow should be given to those who contributed to the support of his family while translating

To produce a text from one written in another language; in JS’s usage, most often through divine means. JS considered the ability to translate to be a gift of the spirit, like the gift of interpreting tongues. He recounted that he translated “reformed Egyptian...

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the fulness of the Scriptures;23

That is, JS’s Bible revision.  


also said until we have perfect love we are liable to fall and when we have a testimony that our names are sealed in the Lamb’s Book of life we have perfect love & then it is impossible for false Christ’s to decieve us. also said that the Lord held the Church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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bound to provide for the families of the absent Elders

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
while proclaiming the Gospel: further said that God had often sealed up the heavens because of covetousness in the Church. Said that the Lord would cut his work short in righteousness24

See Revelation, 6 June 1831 [D&C 52:11].  


and except the church recieve the fulness of the Scriptures that they would yet fall. [p. 13]
Br. Edmund Durfee

3 Oct. 1788–15 Nov. 1845. Farmer, miller. Born in Tiverton, Newport Co., Rhode Island. Son of Perry Durfee and Annie Salisbury. Moved with grandparents to Broadalbin, Montgomery Co., New York, 1801. Married Magdalena Pickle, ca. 1810. Moved to Lenox, Madison...

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said that he had professed religion for a number of years  yet now felt to bear testimony of the goodness of God, & also to consecrate

The dedicating of money, lands, goods, or one’s own life for sacred purposes. Both the New Testament and Book of Mormon referred to some groups having “all things common” economically; the Book of Mormon also referred to individuals who consecrated or dedicated...

View Glossary
all to  the Lord.19

Durfee’s repetition of Joel Johnson’s remarks may be an error in transcription. In Minute Book 2, the Joel Johnson comment is at the bottom of page 12, while the Edmund Durfee comment is at the top of page 13. Ebenezer Robinson may have mistakenly transcribed the same statement for Durfee after beginning a new page.  


Br. Joseph Smith [Sr.]

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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said that he had nothing to consecrate to the  Lord of the things of the Earth, yet he felt to consecrate himself to and family.20

At this time, Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack Smith were living on Frederick G. Williams’s farm. According to Lucy, “My family were all established with this arrangement that we were to cultivate the farm and the products were to support our several families . . . and sustain strange[r]s who were traveling that being either Members of the church or others in search of the truth or on a visit to the place.” Minutes from a 10 October 1831 conference record the decision that Joseph Smith Sr. was to “see to the management of the farm & to the distribution of its productions as the Lord’s agent.” (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845, bk. 12, [6]–[7]; Minute Book 2, 10 Oct. 1831.)  


 Was thankful that God had given him a place among his Saints, felt will ing to labor for their good.
Br. Luke Johnson

3 Nov. 1807–8 Dec. 1861. Farmer, teacher, doctor. Born at Pomfret, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of John Johnson and Alice (Elsa) Jacobs. Lived at Hiram, Portage Co., Ohio, when baptized into LDS church by JS, 10 May 1831. Ordained a priest by Christian Whitmer...

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said that he was determined to be for God and  none else come life or death, also remembered his covenant that he would  consecrate all that he had to the Lord.
Br. Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

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said that he thought best that the information of  the coming forth of the book of Mormon be related by Joseph himself to  the Elders

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
present that all might know for themselves.
Br. Joseph Smith jr. said that it was not intended to tell the world all  the particulars of the coming forth of the book of Mormon, & also said  that it was not expedient for him to relate these things &c.21

To this point, JS apparently had not written a history of the production of the Book of Mormon. In April 1834, he provided “a relation of obtaining and translating the Book of Mormon” to a conference in Norton, Ohio, though the conference minutes do not provide any other information about what he said. An account was finally published in 1842, but it gave few details. (Minute Book 1, 21 Apr. 1834; JS, “Church History,” Times and Seasons, 1 Mar. 1842, 3:707; see also “The Histories of Joseph Smith, 1832–1844.”)  


Br. Frederick G. Williams

28 Oct. 1787–10 Oct. 1842. Ship’s pilot, teacher, physician, justice of the peace. Born at Suffield, Hartford Co., Connecticut. Son of William Wheeler Williams and Ruth Granger. Moved to Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, 1799. Practiced Thomsonian botanical system...

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laid before the Conference the case of Sister  Marsh & family who were somewhat destitute.22

“Sister Marsh” is likely Elizabeth Godkin Marsh. If so, Marsh’s dire financial situation may have resulted in part from her husband’s absence: Thomas B. Marsh was directed in a 6 June 1831 revelation to travel to Missouri and did not return to Ohio until January 1832. “While near the end of our journey” to Missouri, he later recalled, “I was attacked with chills and fever and arrived there very sick. I stayed at the house of Br. Benj. Slade till I got well.” (Revelation, 6 June 1831 [D&C 52:22] ; “T B Marsh,” [3], Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, ca. 1858–1880, CHL ; see also Cahoon, Diary, 9 Aug. 1831.)  


Br. Titus Billings

24 Mar. 1793–6 Feb. 1866. Stonemason, carpenter, musician. Born in Greenfield, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Ebenezer Billings and Esther Joyce. Moved to Mentor, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1817. Married Diantha Morley, 16 Feb. 1817, in Geauga Co. Moved to...

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said that he was surprised that the case of Sister  Marsh should be brought to this Conference, as she and her family were  provided for as well as her brethren around her.
Br Joseph Smith Jr said that he intended to do his duty before  the Lord and hoped that the brethren would be patient, as they had a con siderable distance. also said that the promise of God was that the greatest blessings  which God had to bestow should be given to those who contributed to the support of  his family while translating

To produce a text from one written in another language; in JS’s usage, most often through divine means. JS considered the ability to translate to be a gift of the spirit, like the gift of interpreting tongues. He recounted that he translated “reformed Egyptian...

View Glossary
the fulness of the Scriptures;23

That is, JS’s Bible revision.  


also said until we have  perfect love we are liable to fall and when we have a testimony that our names  are sealed in the Lamb’s Book of life we have perfect love & then it is impossible  for false Christ’s to decieve us. also said that the Lord held the Church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
bound to  provide for the families of the absent Elders

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
while proclaiming the Gospel: further  said that the God had often sealed up the heavens because of covetousness in the  Church. Said that the Lord would cut his work short in righteousness24

See Revelation, 6 June 1831 [D&C 52:11].  


and  except the church recieve the fulness of the Scriptures that they would yet  fall. [p. 13]
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On 25–26 October 1831, the church held a general conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

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in Serenus Burnett’s house in Orange

Located about five miles south of Kirtland Township. Area settled, 1815. Organized 1820. Population in 1830 about 300. Population in 1838 about 800. Sixty-five Latter-day Saints lived in township, by Nov. 1830. Joseph and Julia Murdock, twins adopted by JS...

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, Cuyahoga County, Ohio. The participants included twelve men who had previously been ordained

The conferral of power and authority; to appoint, decree, or set apart. Church members, primarily adults, were ordained to ecclesiastical offices and other responsibilities by the laying on of hands by those with the proper authority. Ordinations to priesthood...

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to the high priesthood

The authority and power held by certain officers in the church. The Book of Mormon referred to the high priesthood as God’s “holy order, which was after the order of his Son,” and indicated that Melchizedek, a biblical figure, was a high priest “after this...

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, seventeen elders

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

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, four priests

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. In the Book of Mormon, priests were described as those who baptized, administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto the church,” and taught “the things pertaining to the kingdom of God.” A June 1829 revelation directed...

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, three teachers

Generally, one who instructs, but also an ecclesiastical and priesthood office. The Book of Mormon explained that teachers were to be ordained “to preach repentance and remission of sins through Jesus Christ, by the endurance of faith on his name to the end...

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, four deacons

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. The “Articles and Covenants” directed deacons to assist teachers in their duties. Deacons were also to “warn, expound, exhort, and teach and invite all to come unto Christ.” Although deacons did not have the authority...

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, and according to a later JS history, “a large congregation” of additional members of the church.1

JS History, vol. A-1, 156. Although the minutes list four priests in attendance, John Whitmer wrote that five priests were present. (Whitmer, History, 38.)  


The business of the conference included ordinations to various offices, preaching by some of the participants, and the sharing of testimonies of the Book of Mormon.2

McLellin, Journal, 25–26 Oct. 1831; Whitmer, History, 38; “History of Luke Johnson,” 3, Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, ca. 1858–1880, CHL. Luke Johnson’s history states that the eleven witnesses to the Book of Mormon, “with uplifted hands, bore their solemn testimony to the truth of that book; as did also the Prophet Joseph.” Although the conference clearly included testimonies of the Book of Mormon, and although many of the eleven witnesses who attested to the existence of the gold plates were present, the minutes of the conference do not reflect the particular event Johnson describes. Of the eleven, neither Christian Whitmer, who held the office of elder, nor Hiram Page, who held the office of teacher, was present at the commencement of the conference when the names of attending priesthood officers were recorded. There is no indication that Jacob Whitmer, another of the eleven witnesses, attended. (Minutes, ca. 3–4 June 1831; Minutes, 6 Sept. 1831.)  


JS himself declined during the meeting to give details of “the coming forth” of the Book of Mormon. The conference also provided new converts a chance to meet JS and other prominent elders. William E. McLellin

18 Jan. 1806–14 Mar. 1883. Schoolteacher, physician, publisher. Born at Smith Co., Tennessee. Son of Charles McLellin and Sarah (a Cherokee Indian). Married first Cynthia Ann, 30 July 1829. Wife died, by summer 1831. Baptized into LDS church by Hyrum Smith...

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, for example, wrote in his journal that he “first saw brother Joseph the Seer, also brothers Oliver [Cowdery]

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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, John [Whitmer]

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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& Sidney [Rigdon]

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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and a great many other Elders” at the conference.3

McLellin, Journal, 25–26 Oct. 1831. Joel Johnson also recounted that he first saw JS at the conference. (Johnson, Autobiography, 2.)  


Many of those present publicly declared their commitment to the church and to God, which, according to McLellin, provided “much spiritual edification & comfort.”4

McLellin, Journal, 25–26 Oct. 1831.  


Joel Johnson

23 Mar. 1802–24 Sept. 1882. Miller, farmer, merchant. Born at Grafton, Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Son of Ezekiel Johnson and Julia Hills. Moved to Newport, Campbell Co., Kentucky, 1813. Moved to Pomfret, Chautauque Co., New York, 1815. Baptized into Baptist...

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recounted that he “received much instruction and was highly edified and blessed of the Lord during the conference.”5

Johnson, Reminiscenses and Journals, vol. 1, p. 16.  


This was the first general conference since members of the church had been ordained to the high priesthood in June 1831,6 and it provided an opportunity for JS and Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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to offer instruction concerning the power of that priesthood. Minutes of the June 1831 meeting do not provide much information about what was said to those ordained to the high priesthood, making it difficult to assess how the ordination was understood at that time. But Levi Hancock

7 Apr. 1803–10 June 1882. Born at Springfield, Hampden Co., Massachusetts. Son of Thomas Hancock III and Amy Ward. Baptized into LDS church, 16 Nov. 1830, at Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Clarissa Reed, 20 Mar. 1831. Served mission to Missouri with ...

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, who was present at the June conference, later recalled a conversation he had in January 1832 with Lyman Wight

9 May 1796–31 Mar. 1858. Farmer. Born at Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York. Son of Levi Wight Jr. and Sarah Corbin. Served in War of 1812. Married Harriet Benton, 5 Jan. 1823, at Henrietta, Monroe Co., New York. Moved to Warrensville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, ...

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, who ordained several individuals to the high priesthood at the June conference. Speaking about the priesthood, Hancock remarked that “neither of us understood what it was.” “I did not understand it,” wrote Hancock, “and he [Wight] could give me no light.”7

“Autobiography of Levi Ward Hancock,” ca. 1896, 43.  


Although no lengthy discussion on high priesthood is captured in the record, the 25–26 October minutes show that JS and Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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provided some instruction to conference attendees. According to the minutes, JS and Rigdon viewed those elders holding the high priesthood as having powers that other elders did not have. The minutes suggest that willingness to relinquish all to God may have been a requirement to obtain the high priesthood and its power “to seal up the Saints unto eternal life.” Accordingly, some participants in the 25–26 October conference made or renewed a covenant to consecrate all to God. Nearly all who did so had been previously ordained to the high priesthood or were ordained at the conference.
The conference also considered business discussed in prior meetings. At an 11 October gathering, for example, Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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had moved that six elders be appointed “to visit the several branches of this church setting them in order” and to raise money for JS and Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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so they could devote themselves to the Bible revision. Reynolds Cahoon

30 Apr. 1790–29 Apr. 1861. Farmer, tanner, builder. Born at Cambridge, Washington Co., New York. Son of William Cahoon Jr. and Mehitable Hodges. Married Thirza Stiles, 11 Dec. 1810. Moved to northeastern Ohio, 1811. Located at Harpersfield, Ashtabula Co.,...

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and David Whitmer

7 Jan. 1805–25 Jan. 1888. Farmer, livery keeper. Born near Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Raised Presbyterian. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, shortly after birth. Attended German Reformed Church. Arranged...

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had been assigned to these tasks,8

Cahoon, Diary, 9 Nov. 1831; Minutes, 11 Oct. 1831.  


and this 25–26 October conference appointed four others to assist. The conference provided instructions on proselytizing as well, perhaps as a result of a declaration in a 1 October conference that the elders were “to go forth and warn the inhabitants of the earth of the things known in the Church of Christ in these last days.”9 Several elements of the conference—including ordinations, discussions of how the needs of missionaries’ families would be met, and instruction on the high priesthood and consecration—seemed to foreshadow an increase in missionary labor. The conference was followed by a public preaching meeting, as the concluding minutes indicate.
Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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served as clerk of the conference and took the minutes. Ebenezer Robinson

25 May 1816–11 Mar. 1891. Printer, editor, publisher. Born at Floyd (near Rome), Oneida Co., New York. Son of Nathan Robinson and Mary Brown. Moved to Utica, Oneida Co., ca. 1831, and learned printing trade at Utica Observer. Moved to Ravenna, Portage Co....

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entered these minutes into Minute Book 2 in 1838.10

The minutes include parenthetical redactions that were probably added after the creation of the original document. (See the source note for Minute Book 2.)  


Facts