53992721

Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

spoil to feed the hungry and clothe the naked, whose provisions and clothing had been robbed from them; and upon the whole, I am rather inclined to believe it was the case; for human nature cannot endure all things.
Soon after these things had transpired in Daviess county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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, Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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was threatened from every quarter; and her citizens assembled in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, many of them moving their wives and children, goods, provisions, and even houses into the city; leaving their lands desolate, in order that they might be embodied and prepared to defend themselves and families to the last. Our Colonel

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

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and his other commissioned officers, had the troops paraded night and morning on the public square, and ordered them to be always ready in case of alarm. When we were dismissed at eve, we were ordered to sleep in our clothes, and be ready at a moments warning to run together at any hour of the night. During this state of alarm, the drum was beat, and guns fired, one night, about midnight. I ran to the public square

Four acres, including site of schoolhouse and anticipated temple. Schoolhouse also used as town hall, courthouse, and church meetinghouse. Kirtland Camp camped in public square, 2 Oct. 1838. Mormon militia assembled in public square before Battle of Crooked...

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, where many had already collected together, and the news was that the south part of our county

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, adjoining Ray

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

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, was attacked by a mob, who were plundering houses, threatening women and children, and taking peaceable citizens prisoners; and telling families to be gone by the next morning or they would burn their houses over their heads. With this information, Captain [John] Killian

25 Apr. 1796–10 Nov. 1858. Born in Lincoln Co., North Carolina. Son of Phillip Killian and Mary Hockins. Moved to Missouri. Married first Lydia Ann Hopper Conley, 25 Aug. 1818, in Howard Co., Missouri. Moved to Lexington, Lillard Co., Missouri, 1818. Moved...

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(to whom Col. Hincle [George M. Hinkle]

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

View Full Bio
had committed the command of the troops in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, when he himself was not present) sent out a detachment under the command of Captain Durphey, aided by the brave D. W. Patten

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

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. This company, consisting of about sixty men, was sent to see what the matter was on the lines; and who was committing depredations, and if necessary, to protect or move in the families and property; and if possible, effect the release of the prisoners.
This company was soon under way, having to ride [p. 33]
spoil to feed the hungry and clothe the naked, whose  provisions and clothing had been robbed from them;  and upon the whole, I am rather inclined to believe  it was the case; for human nature cannot endure all  things.
Soon after these things had transpired in Daviess  county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
, Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
was threatened from every quarter;  and her citizens assembled in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, many of  them moving their wives and children, goods, provi sions, and even houses into the city; leaving their  lands desolate, in order that they might be embodied  and prepared to defend themselves and families to  the last. Our Colonel

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

View Full Bio
and his other commissioned  officers, had the troops paraded night and morning on  the public square, and ordered them to be always  ready in case of alarm. When we were dismissed  at eve, we were ordered to sleep in our clothes, and  be ready at a moments warning to run together at any  hour of the night. During this state of alarm, the  drum was beat, and guns fired, one night, about mid night. I ran to the public square

Four acres, including site of schoolhouse and anticipated temple. Schoolhouse also used as town hall, courthouse, and church meetinghouse. Kirtland Camp camped in public square, 2 Oct. 1838. Mormon militia assembled in public square before Battle of Crooked...

More Info
, where many had  already collected together, and the news was that the  south part of our county

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
, adjoining Ray

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

More Info
, was attack ed by a mob, who were plundering houses, threaten ing women and children, and taking peaceable citi zens prisoners; and telling families to be gone by the  next morning or they would burn their houses over  their heads. With this information, Captain [John] Killian

25 Apr. 1796–10 Nov. 1858. Born in Lincoln Co., North Carolina. Son of Phillip Killian and Mary Hockins. Moved to Missouri. Married first Lydia Ann Hopper Conley, 25 Aug. 1818, in Howard Co., Missouri. Moved to Lexington, Lillard Co., Missouri, 1818. Moved...

View Full Bio
 (to whom Col. Hincle [George M. Hinkle]

13 Nov. 1801–Nov. 1861. Merchant, physician, publisher, minister, farmer. Born in Jefferson Co., Kentucky. Son of Michael Hinkle and Nancy Higgins. Married first Sarah Ann Starkey. Baptized into LDS church, 1832. Moved to Far West, Caldwell Co., Missouri....

View Full Bio
had committed the command  of the troops in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, when he himself was not  present) sent out a detachment under the command  of Captain Durphey, aided by the brave D. W. Pat ten

14 Nov. 1799–25 Oct. 1838. Farmer. Born in Vermont. Son of Benoni Patten and Edith Cole. Moved to Theresa, Oneida Co., New York, as a young child. Moved to Dundee, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, as a youth. Married Phoebe Ann Babcock, 1828, in Dundee. Affiliated...

View Full Bio
. This company, consisting of about sixty men,  was sent to see what the matter was on the lines; and  who was committing depredations, and if necessary,  to protect or move in the families and property; and  if possible, effect the release of the prisoners.
This company was soon under way, having to ride [p. 33]
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Parley P. Pratt

12 Apr. 1807–13 May 1857. Farmer, editor, publisher, teacher, school administrator, legislator, explorer, author. Born at Burlington, Otsego Co., New York. Son of Jared Pratt and Charity Dickinson. Traveled west with brother William to acquire land, 1823....

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, History of the Late Persecution Inflicted by the State of Missouri upon the Mormons, in Which Ten Thousand American Citizens were Robbed, Plundered, and Driven from the State, and Many Others Imprisoned, Martyred, &c. for Their Religion, and All This By Military Force, By Order of the Executive; i–vi, 7–84 pp.; Detroit, MI: Dawson & Bates, 1839. The copy used for this transcription is held at CHL.

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