53993283

Petition to United States Congress, 29 November 1839

they seek and obtain it:— Your Constitution guarantees to every Citizen even the humblest the enjoyment of life liberty and property. It promises to all religious freedom, the right to all to worship God, beneath their own vine & fig tree according to the dictates of their conscience— It guarantees to all the Citizens of the several states the right to become Citizens of any one of the states; and to enjoy all the rights and immunities of the Citizens of the State of his adoption.
Yet of all these rights have the Mormons been deprived, They have without a cause without a trial been deprived of life liberty and property. They have been persecuted for their religious opinions, They have been driven from the State of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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at the point of the bayonet, and prevented from enjoying and exerciseing the rights of of Citizens of the state of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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.
It is the theory of our laws, that for the violations of every legal right, there is provided a legal remedy— What then we would respectfully ask is the remedy of the Mormons? Shall they apply to the Legislature of the State of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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for redress? They have done so. They have [p. 34]
they seek and obtain it:— Your Constitutions  guarantees to every Citizens even the humblest  the enjoyment <of> life liberty and property.  It promises to all religious freedom, the  right to all to worship God, ben[e]ath their  own vine & fig tree according to the dictates  of their conscience— It guarantees to all  the Citizens of any one <the several> state<s> <the right> to become  Citizens of another <any one of the> state<s>;

Insertions in this paragraph in the handwriting of Robert D. Foster.  


and to enjoy  all the rights and immunities of the  Citizens of the State of his adoption.
Yet in all those of all these rights have  the Mormons been deprived, They have  without a cause been deprive without a  trial been deprived of life liberty and  property. They have been pe[r]secuted for  their religious opinions, They have been  driven from the State of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
at the  point of the bayonet, and prevented from  enjoying and exerciseing the rights of  of Citizens of the state of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
.
It is the theory of our laws, that for the  violations of every legal right, there  is provided a legal remedy— What then  we would respectfully ask is the remedy  of the Mormons? Shall they apply to the  Legislature of the State of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
for  redress? They have done so. They have [p. 34]
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, to United States Congress, Washington DC, ca. 29 Nov. 1839; handwriting of Elias Higbee with corrections by Thomas Bullock and probably Robert D. Foster

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; 35 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes endorsement.

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