43990383

Petition to United States Congress, 29 November 1839

The next morning the Prisoners were marched under a strong guard to Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

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in Jackson County, and after being detained there for a week or two they were marched to Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

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where General Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

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then was with his troops— Here a Court of inquiry was held before Judge King

21 Sept. 1802–22 Apr. 1870. Attorney, judge, politician, farmer. Born at Sullivan Co., Tennessee. Son of Walter King and Nancy Sevier. Married first Nancy Harris Roberts, 13 May 1828, at Jackson, Madison Co., Tennessee. In 1830, moved to Missouri, where he...

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, this continued from the 11th. until the 28th. of Nov. while the five prisoners were kept in chains while about fifty other Mormons taken at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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were penned up in an open unfinished Court House,
In this Mock Court of inquiry the heard only such as was defendants were prevented from any testimony a their had by an armed force at the court house they was advised by their lawyers not to bring any as they would be in danger of their lives or drove out of the country so their was no testimony examined only against them This Inquiry a great many Questions were asked relative to religious opinions The conclusion of the Court of inquiry was to send the prisoners to jail upon a charge of Treason. They do not deem it necessary to detail their sufferings while in Prison, The horrors of a Prison, for four long months, in darkness in want, alone, and during the cold of winter can better be concieved than expressed—— [p. 28]
The next morning the Prisoners were  marched under a strong guard to In dependence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

More Info
in Jackson County, and  after being detained there for a week  or two they were marched to Richmond

Area settled, ca. 1814. Officially platted as Ray Co. seat, 1827. Population in 1840 about 500. Seat of Fifth Judicial Circuit Court of Missouri; also location of courthouse and jails. JS and about sixty other Mormon men were incarcerated here while awaiting...

More Info
 where General Clark

17 Apr. 1802–29 Oct. 1885. Lawyer, politician. Born at Madison Co., Kentucky. Moved to Howard Co., Missouri, 1818. Practiced law in Fayette, Howard Co., beginning 1824. Clerk of Howard Co. courts, 1824–1834. Appointed brigadier general in Missouri militia...

View Full Bio
then was with his  troops— Here a Court of inquiry was  held before Judge King

21 Sept. 1802–22 Apr. 1870. Attorney, judge, politician, farmer. Born at Sullivan Co., Tennessee. Son of Walter King and Nancy Sevier. Married first Nancy Harris Roberts, 13 May 1828, at Jackson, Madison Co., Tennessee. In 1830, moved to Missouri, where he...

View Full Bio
, this continued  from <the> 11th. until the 28th. of Nov. while  the five prisoners were kept in chains  while about fifty other Mormons taken  at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
were penned up in an  open unfinished Court House,
In this Mock Court of inquiry the  Judge

21 Sept. 1802–22 Apr. 1870. Attorney, judge, politician, farmer. Born at Sullivan Co., Tennessee. Son of Walter King and Nancy Sevier. Married first Nancy Harris Roberts, 13 May 1828, at Jackson, Madison Co., Tennessee. In 1830, moved to Missouri, where he...

View Full Bio
could not be prevailed upon  examine any witnesses in favor of the  prisoners but heard only such as was  brought against them  <defendants were prevented from any testimony a their had by an armed  force under at the court house they was advised by their lawyers not  to bring any as they would be in danger of their lives or drove out of the  country so their was no testimony examined only against them>

Insertion in the handwriting of Robert D. Foster.  


This Inquiry  was had principally into their religious  opinions which were entirely misrepresented  <a great many Questions were asked relative to religious opinions>

Insertion in the handwriting of Robert D. Foster.  


 The conclusion of the Court of inquiry  was to send the prisoners to jail upo[n] a  charge of Treason. They do not deem  it necessary to detail their sufferings while  in Prison, The horrors of a Prison, for four  long months, in darkness in want, alone, and  during the cold of winter can better be con cieved than expressed—— [p. 28]
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JS, Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, and Elias Higbee

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, petition, Washington DC

Created as district for seat of U.S. federal government by act of Congress, 1790, and named Washington DC, 1791. Named in honor of George Washington. Headquarters of executive, legislative, and judicial branches of U.S. government relocated to Washington ...

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, to United States Congress, Washington DC, ca. 29 Nov. 1839; handwriting of Elias Higbee with corrections by Thomas Bullock and probably Robert D. Foster

14 Mar. 1811–1 Feb. 1878. Physician, land speculator. Born in Braunston, Northamptonshire, England. Son of John Foster and Jane Knibb. Married Sarah Phinney, 18 July 1837, at Medina Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church, before Oct. 1839. Ordained an elder,...

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; 35 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes endorsement.

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