53993283

Petition to United States Congress, 29 November 1839

but were peaceably following the routine of their daily duties. Shortly after the Meeting above refered to another persecution commenced. Some of the Mormons were shot at, others were whipped, their houses , were assaulted with brick-bats, broken open and thrown down their women & children were insulted and thus for many weeks without offence without resistance by night and by day were they harrassed insulted and oppressed. There is a point beyond which endurance ceases to be a virtue. The worm when trampled upon will turn upon its oppressor. A company of about Thirty Mormons fell in with twice that Number of the Mob, engaged in the destruction of Mormon property, when a battle ensued in which one Mormon was killed and two or three of the Mob, Acting in Concert with the Officer who commanded the Mob was Lilburn W. Boggs

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

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Lieut. Gov.r. of the State of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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. When the Noise of this battle was spread abroad the public mind became much inflamed. The Militia collected in arms from all quarters and in great numbers, and inflamed to fury— They demanded, that the Mormons should surrender up all their arms and immediately quit the County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

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. Compelled [p. 6]
but were peaceably following the routine  of their daily duties. Shortly after the Meeting  above refered to another persecution  commenced. Some of the Mormons were  shot at, others were whipped, their houses  were thrown down, were assaulted with  brick-bats, broken open and thrown down  their women & children were insulted and  thus for many weeks without offence without  resistance by night and by day were  they harrassed insulted and oppressed.  There is a point beyond which endurance  ceases to be a virtue. The worm when  trampled upon will turn upon its  oppressor. A company of about Thirty  Mormons fell in with twice that Number  of the Mob, engaged in the destruction  of Mormon property, when a battle  ensued in which one Mormon was  killed and two or three of the Mob,  Acting in Concert with the Officer who  commanded the Mob was Lilburn [W.] Boggs

14 Dec. 1796–14 Mar. 1860. Bookkeeper, bank cashier, merchant, Indian agent and trader, lawyer, doctor, postmaster, politician. Born at Lexington, Fayette Co., Kentucky. Son of John M. Boggs and Martha Oliver. Served in War of 1812. Moved to St. Louis, ca...

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 Lieut. Gov.r. of the State of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
. When the  Noise of this battle was spread abroad the  public mind became much inflamed.  The Militia collected in arms from all quarters  and in great numbers, and inflamed  to fury— They demanded, that the Mormons  should surrender up all their arms and  immediately quit the County

Settled at Fort Osage, 1808. County created, 16 Feb. 1825; organized 1826. Named after U.S. president Andrew Jackson. Featured fertile lands along Missouri River and was Santa Fe Trail departure point, which attracted immigrants to area. Area of county reduced...

More Info
. Compelled [p. 6]
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JS, Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, and Elias Higbee

23 Oct. 1795–8 June 1843. Clerk, judge, surveyor. Born at Galloway, Gloucester Co., New Jersey. Son of Isaac Higbee and Sophia Somers. Moved to Clermont Co., Ohio, 1803. Married Sarah Elizabeth Ward, 10 Sept. 1818, in Tate Township, Clermont Co. Lived at ...

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, Petition, Washington DC

Created as district for seat of U.S. federal government by act of Congress, 1790, and named Washington DC, 1791. Named in honor of George Washington. Headquarters of executive, legislative, and judicial branches of U.S. government relocated to Washington ...

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, to United States Congress, Washington DC, ca. 29 Nov. 1839; handwriting of Elias Higbee with corrections by Thomas Bullock and probably Robert D. Foster

14 Mar. 1811–1 Feb. 1878. Physician, land speculator. Born in Braunston, Northamptonshire, England. Son of John Foster and Jane Knibb. Married Sarah Phinney, 18 July 1837, at Medina Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church, before Oct. 1839. Ordained an elder,...

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; 35 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes endorsement.

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