43990383

Petition to United States Congress, 29 November 1839

Petitioned, and their Petitions have been treated with silence & contempt. Shall they apply to the Federal Courts? They were at the time of the injury Citizens of the State of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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— Shall they apply to the courts of the State of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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? Whom sh they s, The order for their destruction their extermination was granted by the Executive of the State of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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. Is not this a peice of justification for the acts of individuals done in pursuance of that order? If not before whom shall the mormons institute a trial? Should they summon as Jury of the individuals who composed the Mob an appeal to them were in vain— They dare [not] go to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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to institute a suit. Their lives would be in danger.
Petition to Congress for redress
(ab. 29 Nov. 1839) [p. 35]
Petitioned, and their Petitions have been  treated with silence & contempt. Shall  they apply to the Courts Federal Courts?  They were at the time <of the injury> Citizens of the State  of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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— Shall they apply to the courts  of the State of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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? Whom sh◊◊◊  they s◊◊◊, The order for their destruction  their extermination was granted by  the Executive of the State of Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
.  Is not this a peice of justification  for the acts of individuals done in  pursuance of that order? If not before  whom shall the mormons institute  a trial? Should they summon as Jury of  the individuals who composed the Mob  an appeal to them were in vain—  They dare [not?] go to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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to institute a suit. Their  lives would be in danger.
<Octr. 23d>
<Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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>
<Petition to Congress  for redress>
<(ab. 29 Nov. 1839)>

Insertions in the handwriting of Thomas Bullock.  


[p. 35]
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JS, Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, and Elias Higbee

23 Oct. 1795–8 June 1843. Clerk, judge, surveyor. Born at Galloway, Gloucester Co., New Jersey. Son of Isaac Higbee and Sophia Somers. Moved to Clermont Co., Ohio, 1803. Married Sarah Elizabeth Ward, 10 Sept. 1818, in Tate Township, Clermont Co. Lived at ...

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, petition, Washington DC

Created as district for seat of U.S. federal government by act of Congress, 1790, and named Washington DC, 1791. Named in honor of George Washington. Headquarters of executive, legislative, and judicial branches of U.S. government relocated to Washington ...

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, to United States Congress, Washington DC, ca. 29 Nov. 1839; handwriting of Elias Higbee with corrections by Thomas Bullock and probably Robert D. Foster

14 Mar. 1811–1 Feb. 1878. Physician, land speculator. Born in Braunston, Northamptonshire, England. Son of John Foster and Jane Knibb. Married Sarah Phinney, 18 July 1837, at Medina Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church, before Oct. 1839. Ordained an elder,...

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; 35 pages; JS Collection, CHL. Includes endorsement.

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