43991282

Proclamation, 15 January 1841

couraged, and also that they may see the persecutions we suffered in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, were but the prelude to a far more glorious display of the power of truth, and of the religion we have espoused.
From the kind, uniform, and consistent course pursued by the citizens of Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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, and the great success which has attended us while here, the natural advantages of this place for every purpose we require, and the necessity of the gathering of the Saints of the Most High, we would say, let the brethren who love the prosperity of Zion, who are anxious that her stakes should be strengthened, and her cords lengthened, and who prefer her prosperity to their chief joy, come, and cast in their lots with us, and cheerfully engage in a work so glorious and sublime, and say with Nehemiah, “we his servants will arise and build.”
It probably would hardly be necessary to enforce this important subject on the attention of the Saints, as its necessity is obvious, and is a subject of paramount importance; but as watchmen to the house of Israel, as Shepherds over the flock which is now scattered over a vast extent of country, and the anxiety we feel for their prosperity and everlasting welfare, and for the carrying out the great and glorious purposes of our God, to which we have been called, we feel to urge its necessity, and say, let the Saints come hereThis is the word of the Lord, and in accordance with the great work of the last days.
It is true the idea of a general gathering has heretofore been associated with most cruel and oppressing scenes, owing to our unrelenting persecutions at the hands of wicked and unjust men: but we hope that those days of darkness and gloom have gone by, and from the liberal policy of our State

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

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government, we may expect a scene of peace and prosperity, we have never before witnessed since the rise of our church, and the happiness and prosperity which now await us, is, in all human probablility, incalculably great. By a concentration of action, and a unity of effort, we can only accomplish the great work of the last days, which we could not do in our remote and scattered condition, while our interests both spiritual and temporal will be greatly enhanced, and the blessings of heaven must flow unto us in an uninterrupted stream; of this, we think there can be no question. The great profusion of temporal and spiritual blessings, which always flow from faithfulness and concerted effort, never attend individual exertion or enterprize. The history of all past ages abundantly attests this fact.
In addition to all temporal blessings, there is no other way for the Saints to be saved in these last days, as the concurrent testimony of all the holy prophets clearly proves, for it is written—“They shall come from the east and be gathered from the west; the north shall give up, and the south shall keep not back”— “the sons of God shall be gathered from far, and his daughters from the ends of the earth:” it is also the concurrent testimony of all the prophets, that this gathering together of all the Saints, must take place before the Lord comes to “take vengeance upon the ungodly,” and “to be glorified and admired by all those who obey his gospel.” The 50 Psalm from the first to the fifth verses, inclusive, describes the glory and majesty of that event. “The mighty God even the Lord hath spoken and called the earth from the rising of the sun unto the going down thereof.— Out of Zion, the perfection of beauty, God hath shined.
Our God shall come, and shall not keep silence: a fire shall devour before him and it shall be very tempestous round about him.
He shall call to the heavens from above, and to the earth, (that he may judge his people.)
Gather my Saints together unto me; those that have made a covenant with me by sacrifice.”
We might offer many other quotations from the scriptures, but believing them to be familiar to the Saints we forbear.
We would wish the Saints to understand that, when they come here they must not expect to find perfection, or that all will be harmony, peace and love; if they indulge these ideas, they will undoubtedly be deceived for here there are persons, not only from different States, but from different nations, who, although they feel a great attach [p. 276]
couraged, and also that they may see  the persecutions we suffered in  Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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, were but the prelude to a far  more glorious display of the power of  truth, and of the religion we have es poused.
From the kind, uniform, and consis tent course pursued by the citizens of  Illinois

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

More Info
, and the great success which  has attended us while here, the natur al advantages of this place for every  purpose we require, and the necessity  of the gathering of the Saints of the  Most High, we would say, let the breth ren who love the prosperity of Zion, who  are anxious that her stakes should be  strengthened, and her cords lengthened,  and who prefer her prosperity to their  chief joy, come, and cast in their lots  with us, and cheerfully engage in a  work so glorious and sublime, and say  with Nehemiah, “we his servants will  arise and build.”
It probably would hardly be neces sary to enforce this important subject  on the attention of the Saints, as its ne cessity is obvious, and is a subject of  paramount importance; but as watch men to the house of Israel, as Shep herds over the flock which is now  scattered over a vast extent of country,  and the anxiety we feel for their pros perity and everlasting welfare, and  for the carrying out the great and glo rious purposes of our God, to which  we have been called, we feel to urge  its necessity, and say, let the Saints  come hereThis is the word of the  Lord, and in accordance with the great  work of the last days.
It is true the idea of a general gath ering has heretofore been associated  with most cruel and oppressing scenes,  owing to our unrelenting persecutions  at the hands of wicked and unjust men:  but we hope that those days of dark ness and gloom have gone by, and  from the liberal policy of our State

Became part of Northwest Territory of U.S., 1787. Admitted as state, 1818. Population in 1840 about 480,000. Population in 1845 about 660,000. Plentiful, inexpensive land attracted settlers from northern and southern states. Following expulsion from Missouri...

More Info
 government, we may expect a scene of  peace and prosperity, we have never  before witnessed since the rise of our  church, and the happiness and pros perity which now await us, is, in all  human probablility, incalculably great.  By a concentration of action, and a  unity of effort, we can only accom plish the great work of the last days,  which we could not do in our remote  and scattered condition, while our inter ests both spiritual and temporal will be  greatly enhanced, and the blessings of  heaven must flow unto us in an unin terrupted stream; of this, we think  there can be no question. The great  profusion of temporal and spiritual  blessings, which always flow from  faithfulness and concerted effort, never  attend individual exertion or enterprize.  The history of all past ages abundant ly attests this fact.
In addition to all temporal blessings,  there is no other way for the Saints to  be saved in these last days, as the con current testimony of all the holy proph ets clearly proves, for it is written— “They shall come from the east and be  gathered from the west; the north shall  give up, and the south shall keep not  back”— “the sons of God shall be gath ered from far, and his daughters from  the ends of the earth:” it is also the  concurrent testimony of all the proph ets, that this gathering together of all  the Saints, must take place before the  Lord comes to “take vengeance upon  the ungodly,” and “to be glorified and  admired by all those who obey his gos pel.” The 50 Psalm from the first to  the fifth verses, inclusive, describes the  glory and majesty of that event. “The  mighty God even the Lord hath spoken  and called the earth from the rising of  the sun unto the going down thereof.—  Out of Zion, the perfection of beauty,  God hath shined.
Our God shall come, and shall not  keep silence: a fire shall devour before  him and it shall be very tempestous  round about him.
He shall call to the heavens from a bove, and to the earth, (that he may  judge his people.)
Gather my Saints together unto me;  those that have made a covenant with  me by sacrifice.”
We might offer many other quota tions from the scriptures, but believing  them to be familiar to the Saints we  forbear.
We would wish the Saints to under stand that, when they come here they  must not expect to find perfection, or  that all will be harmony, peace and  love; if they indulge these ideas, they  will undoubtedly be deceived for here  there are persons, not only from differ ent States, but from different nations,  who, although they feel a great attach [p. 276]
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