31826

Revelation, 12 August 1831 [D&C 61]

Behooveth me that ye should part wherefore let them my servent Sidney Gilbert

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

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& William

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

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take their former company11

Gilbert and Phelps traveled from Kirtland, Ohio, to Missouri in the same group. (JS History, vol. A-1, 126.)  


& let them take their Journey in haste that they may fill their mission12

For Gilbert and Phelps, this was a reversal of instructions in an 8 August 1831 revelation. That revelation directed the company returning to Ohio to go “speedily” to St. Louis, Missouri, after which JS, Sidney Rigdon, and Oliver Cowdery were to travel to Cincinnati and the “residue” of the company were to preach, “not in haste.” (Revelation, 8 Aug. 1831 [D&C 60:5–8].)  


& through faith they shall overcome & in as much as they are faithfull they shall be preserved13

See Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 345 [Alma 44:4].  


& I the Lord will be with them & let the residue take that which is needfull for clothing let my servent sidney Gilbert

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

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take that which is not needfull with him as you shall agree & now behold for your good I give unto you a commandment

Generally, a divine mandate that church members were expected to obey; more specifically, a text dictated by JS in the first-person voice of Deity that served to communicate knowledge and instruction to JS and his followers. Occasionally, other inspired texts...

View Glossary
concerning these things & I the Lord will reason with you as with men in days of old14

A May 1831 revelation stated that “when a man reasoneth he under[stand]eth of man because he reasoneth as a man even so will I the Lord reason with you that you may understand.” (Revelation, 9 May 1831 [D&C 50:12].)  


Behold I the Lord in the begining belessed the waters but in the last days by the mouth of my servent John I cursed the waters15

According to the creation account in Genesis, when God separated the land from the water, he called both good. The Bible does not contain an explicit reference to John (presumably John the Revelator) cursing the waters, but John’s vision of the last days included a burning mountain and a great star falling into the waters, causing death and destruction and making the waters “bitter.” (Genesis 1:9–10; Revelation 8:8–11.)  


wherefore the days will come that no flesh shall be safe upon the waters & it shall be said in days to come that none is able to go up to the land of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
upon the waters but he that is upright in heart & as I the Lord in the begining cursed the land even so in the last days have I blessed it in its time for the use of my saints that they may partake the fatness thereof16

According to Genesis 3:17, God cursed the land for Adam’s sake. A revelation dated five days before this 12 August revelation explained that the obedient in Zion would receive the good things of the earth. (Revelation, 7 Aug. 1831 [D&C 59:16–20]; see also Revelation, 15 June 1831 [D&C 56:18]; and Revelation, 1 Aug. 1831 [D&C 58:7–8].)  


& now I give unto you a commandment & what I say unto one I say unto all17

Shortly before leaving to Missouri, JS added “and what I say unto one I say unto all men” to Matthew 24:42 during his revision of the Bible. (New Testament Revision 1, p. 57 [Joseph Smith Translation, Matthew 24:42]; see also Faulring et al., Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible, 66.)  


that you shall forewarn your brethren concerning these waters that they come not in Journeying upon them lest their faith fail & they are caught in her snares I the Lord hath decreed & the destroyer rideth upon the face thereof18

In the context of this revelation, “destroyer” apparently refers to death. This usage, which appears in the biblical account of the Passover, was present in discourse of Protestant America in the 1830s, in which the “destroyer” was often equated with death or the “Angel of Death.” (See Exodus 12:23; Robinson, Calmet’s Dictionary of the Holy Bible, 61; and “Cleavland Tuesday June 5th,” Scioto Gazette [Chillicothe, OH], 20 June 1832, [1].)  


& I revoke not the decree I the Lord was angery with you yesterday but to day mine anger is turned away19

See Isaiah 12:1; and Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 99 [2 Nephi 22:1].  


wherefore let those whom I have spoken that should take their Journey in haste again I say unto you let them take their Journey in haste & it mattereth not unto me after a little if it so be that they fill their mission whether they go by water or by land let this be as it is made known unto them according to their Judgement20

A 1 August revelation instructed the elders to “do many things of their own free will.” (Revelation, 1 Aug. 1831 [D&C 58:27].)  


& now concerning my servents Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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Joseph & Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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let them come not again upon the waters save it be upon the canal while Journeying unto their homes21

When JS traveled to Missouri, he took the Ohio and Erie Canal as far as Newark, Ohio, and then traveled west to Dayton, where he took the Miami Canal south to Cincinnati. Although the Ohio and Erie Canal, which was intended to connect Lake Erie with the Ohio River, extended as far south as Chillicothe, Ohio. But the stretch from Chillicothe to the Ohio River at Portsmouth was still under construction, making it necessary to cross by land to Dayton to reach the Miami Canal. On their return journey to Kirtland, JS, Rigdon, and Cowdery did not use the canal system. (William W. Phelps, “Extract of a Letter from the Late Editor,” Ontario Phoenix [Canandaigua, NY], 7 Sept. 1831, [2]; 1833 Ohio Gazetteer, xxviii–xxix; Woods, Ohio’s Grand Canal, 18–19; see also JS History, vol. A-1, 146.)  


or in other words they shall not come upon upon the waters to Journey save upon the canal Behold I the Lord have appointed a way for the Journeying of my saints [p. 102]
Behooveth me that ye should part wherefore let them my servent  Sidney [Gilbert]

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

View Full Bio
& William

17 Feb. 1792–7 Mar. 1872. Writer, teacher, printer, newspaper editor, publisher, postmaster, lawyer. Born at Hanover, Morris Co., New Jersey. Son of Enon Phelps and Mehitabel Goldsmith. Moved to Homer, Cortland Co., New York, 1800. Married Sally Waterman,...

View Full Bio
take their former company11

Gilbert and Phelps traveled from Kirtland, Ohio, to Missouri in the same group. (JS History, vol. A-1, 126.)  


& let them  take their Journey in haste that they may fill their mission12

For Gilbert and Phelps, this was a reversal of instructions in an 8 August 1831 revelation. That revelation directed the company returning to Ohio to go “speedily” to St. Louis, Missouri, after which JS, Sidney Rigdon, and Oliver Cowdery were to travel to Cincinnati and the “residue” of the company were to preach, “not in haste.” (Revelation, 8 Aug. 1831 [D&C 60:5–8].)  


 & through faith they shall overcome & in as much as they are  faithfull they shall be preserved13

See Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 345 [Alma 44:4].  


& I the Lord will be with  them & let the residue take that which is needfull for  clothing let my servent sidney [Gilbert]

28 Dec. 1789–29 June 1834. Merchant. Born at New Haven, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Eli Gilbert and Lydia Hemingway. Moved to Huntington, Fairfield Co., Connecticut; to Monroe, Monroe Co., Michigan Territory, by Sept. 1818; to Painesville, Geauga Co...

View Full Bio
take that which is not needfull  with them him as you shall agree & now behold for your good  I give unto you a commandment

Generally, a divine mandate that church members were expected to obey; more specifically, a text dictated by JS in the first-person voice of Deity that served to communicate knowledge and instruction to JS and his followers. Occasionally, other inspired texts...

View Glossary
concerning these things & I  the Lord will reason with you as with men in days of old14

A May 1831 revelation stated that “when a man reasoneth he under[stand]eth of man because he reasoneth as a man even so will I the Lord reason with you that you may understand.” (Revelation, 9 May 1831 [D&C 50:12].)  


 Behold I the Lord in the begining belessed the waters but in  the last days by the mouth of my servent John I cursed  the waters15

According to the creation account in Genesis, when God separated the land from the water, he called both good. The Bible does not contain an explicit reference to John (presumably John the Revelator) cursing the waters, but John’s vision of the last days included a burning mountain and a great star falling into the waters, causing death and destruction and making the waters “bitter.” (Genesis 1:9–10; Revelation 8:8–11.)  


wherefore the days will come that no flesh shall  be safe upon the waters & it shall be said in days to come  that none is able to go up to the land of Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Jesus Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the ...

View Glossary
upon the  waters but he that is upright in heart & as I the Lord in  the begining cursed the land even so in the last days have  I blessed it in its time for the use of my saints that they  may partake the fatness thereof16

According to Genesis 3:17, God cursed the land for Adam’s sake. A revelation dated five days before this 12 August revelation explained that the obedient in Zion would receive the good things of the earth. (Revelation, 7 Aug. 1831 [D&C 59:16–20]; see also Revelation, 15 June 1831 [D&C 56:18]; and Revelation, 1 Aug. 1831 [D&C 58:7–8].)  


& now I give unto you a  commandment & what I say unto one I say unto all17

Shortly before leaving to Missouri, JS added “and what I say unto one I say unto all men” to Matthew 24:42 during his revision of the Bible. (New Testament Revision 1, p. 57 [Joseph Smith Translation, Matthew 24:42]; see also Faulring et al., Joseph Smith’s New Translation of the Bible, 66.)  


that  you shall forewarn your brethren concerning these waters  that they come not in Journeying on upon them lest their faith  fail & they are caught in her snares I the Lord hath decreed  & the destroyer rideth upon the face thereof18

In the context of this revelation, “destroyer” apparently refers to death. This usage, which appears in the biblical account of the Passover, was present in discourse of Protestant America in the 1830s, in which the “destroyer” was often equated with death or the “Angel of Death.” (See Exodus 12:23; Robinson, Calmet’s Dictionary of the Holy Bible, 61; and “Cleavland Tuesday June 5th,” Scioto Gazette [Chillicothe, OH], 20 June 1832, [1].)  


& I revoke not  the decree I the Lord was angery with you yesterday but to day  mine anger is turned away19

See Isaiah 12:1; and Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 99 [2 Nephi 22:1].  


wherefore let those whom I have  spoken that should take their Journey in haste again I say  unto you let them take their Journey in haste & it mattereth  not unto me after a little if it so be that they fill their  mission whether they go by water or by land let this be as it is  made known unto them according to their Judgement20

A 1 August revelation instructed the elders to “do many things of their own free will.” (Revelation, 1 Aug. 1831 [D&C 58:27].)  


& now  concerning my servents Sidney [Rigdon]

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

View Full Bio
Joseph & Oliver [Cowdery]

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
let them come  not again upon the waters save it be upon the canal while  Journeying unto their homes21

When JS traveled to Missouri, he took the Ohio and Erie Canal as far as Newark, Ohio, and then traveled west to Dayton, where he took the Miami Canal south to Cincinnati. Although the Ohio and Erie Canal, which was intended to connect Lake Erie with the Ohio River, extended as far south as Chillicothe, Ohio. But the stretch from Chillicothe to the Ohio River at Portsmouth was still under construction, making it necessary to cross by land to Dayton to reach the Miami Canal. On their return journey to Kirtland, JS, Rigdon, and Cowdery did not use the canal system. (William W. Phelps, “Extract of a Letter from the Late Editor,” Ontario Phoenix [Canandaigua, NY], 7 Sept. 1831, [2]; 1833 Ohio Gazetteer, xxviii–xxix; Woods, Ohio’s Grand Canal, 18–19; see also JS History, vol. A-1, 146.)  


or in other words they shall not  come upon upon the waters <to Journey> save upon the canal Behold I  the Lord have appointed a way for the Journeying of my saints [p. 102]
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Revelation, Bank of the Missouri River

One of longest rivers in North America, in excess of 3,000 miles. From headwaters in Montana to confluence with Mississippi River near St. Louis, Missouri River drains 580,000 square miles (about one-sixth of continental U.S.). Explored by Lewis and Clark...

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[at McIlwaine’s Bend], MO, 12 Aug. 1831. Featured version copied [ca. Sept. 1831] in Revelation Book 1, pp. 101–103; handwriting of John Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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; CHL. Includes redactions. For more complete source information, see the source note for Revelation Book 1.

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