26032

Revelation, February 1829 [D&C 4]

A revalation from the Lord unto Jos

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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[page damaged]1

This heading likely named Joseph Smith Sr. as the recipient. It is unknown whether Partridge or someone else first created this heading.  


AD 1829
Saying now behold a marvelous work is about to come among the [page damaged] children2

Missing text supplied from Revelation Book 1, p. 2.  


of men3

See Isaiah 29:14.  


Therefore O ye that embark in the service of God see that ye serve him with all your heart might mind & strenght4

See, for example, Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 106, 156, 587 [2 Nephi 25:29; Mosiah 2:11; Moroni 10:32].  


that ye may stand blameless before God at the last day therefore if ye have desires to serve God ye are called to the work for behold the field is white already to harvest5

See John 4:35.  


& lo he that thursteth in his sickle6

See Revelation 14:15–16.  


with his might the same layeth up his store that he perish not but bringeth Salvation to his soul & faith hope charity & love with an eye single to the glory of God constitutes7

The Book of Commandments has “qualifies,” possibly reflecting wording from the nonextant portion of Revelation Book 1. (Book of Commandments 3:1 [D&C 4:5].)  


him for the work remember temperance patience humility diligence &C.8

This “etcetera” likely signaled to readers that it was standing in for the fuller description in 2 Peter 1:5–7. Later, editors of the 1835 edition of the Doctrine and Covenants replaced “&C” with the entire list of virtues from 2 Peter: “Remember faith, virtue, knowledge, temperance, patience, brotherly kindness, godliness, charity, humility, diligence.” (Doctrine and Covenants 31:2, 1835 ed. [D&C 4:6].)  


Ask & ye shall receive knock & it shall be opened unto you9

See Matthew 7:7–8.  


amen [p. [1]]
A revalation from the Lord unto Jos

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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[page damaged]1

This heading likely named Joseph Smith Sr. as the recipient. It is unknown whether Partridge or someone else first created this heading.  


AD 1829
Saying now behold a marvelous work is about to come among the [page damaged]  [children]2

Missing text supplied from Revelation Book 1, p. 2.  


of men3

See Isaiah 29:14.  


Therefore O ye that embark in the service of God see that ye serve  him with all your heart mind might mind & strenght4

See, for example, Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 106, 156, 587 [2 Nephi 25:29; Mosiah 2:11; Moroni 10:32].  


that ye may stand  blameless before God at the last day therefore if ye have desires to serve  God ye are called to the work for behold the field is white already  to harvest5

See John 4:35.  


& lo he that thursteth in his sickle6

See Revelation 14:15–16.  


with his might  the same layeth up his store that he perish not but bringeth  Salvation to his own soul & faith hope charity & love with an  eye single to the glory of God constitutes7

The Book of Commandments has “qualifies,” possibly reflecting wording from the nonextant portion of Revelation Book 1. (Book of Commandments 3:1 [D&C 4:5].)  


him for the work  remember temperance patience humility diligence &C.8

This “etcetera” likely signaled to readers that it was standing in for the fuller description in 2 Peter 1:5–7. Later, editors of the 1835 edition of the Doctrine and Covenants replaced “&C” with the entire list of virtues from 2 Peter: “Remember faith, virtue, knowledge, temperance, patience, brotherly kindness, godliness, charity, humility, diligence.” (Doctrine and Covenants 31:2, 1835 ed. [D&C 4:6].)  


Ask & ye shall receive knock & it shall be opened unto  you9

See Matthew 7:7–8.  


amen [p. [1]]
JS dictated this revelation for his father, Joseph Smith Sr.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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, one of his earliest and staunchest supporters. When John Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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copied this text into Revelation Book 1, he included this heading: “A Revelation to Joseph the Father of the Seer he desired to know what the Lord had for him to do & this is what he Received as follows.” Revelation Book 1 initially gave the date of 1828. An unidentified scribe wrote a “9” over the “8,” thus changing the date from 1828 to 1829, apparently correcting a scribal error. The index to Revelation Book 1 also lists 1829 as the date of the revelation. Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, likely in late 1831, added “Febr.” to the heading in Revelation Book 1 to further specify the date.1

Revelation Book 1, pp. 2, [207]. It is not clear who changed the “8” to a “9.” Whitmer may have corrected his initial mistake, or Sidney Rigdon may have made the change when he inserted the month.  


The copy featured below is a more complete and probably an earlier version than that inscribed in Revelation Book 1, which is missing the page that includes the final portion of this revelation. The version below is in the handwriting of Edward Partridge

27 Aug. 1793–27 May 1840. Hatter. Born at Pittsfield, Berkshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of William Partridge and Jemima Bidwell. Moved to Painesville, Geauga Co., Ohio. Married Lydia Clisbee, 22 Aug. 1819, at Painesville. Initially a Universal Restorationist...

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and was kept by him. Partridge dated the document to 1829, a date also used in JS’s history.2

JS History, vol. A-1, 11. An 1828 date is also unlikely for other historical and textual reasons. Joseph Smith Sr. made his only known 1828 visit to Harmony around September, and neither JS nor Lucy Mack Smith made any mention of a revelation for Joseph Sr. being dictated at that time. In addition, the language of this revelation is much more similar to several 1829 texts than to the only surviving JS revelation from 1828. (Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845, bk. 7, [8], [11]; Revelation, July 1828 [D&C 3].)  


Joseph Knight Sr.

3 Nov. 1772–2 Feb. 1847. Farmer, miller. Born at Oakham, Worcester Co., Massachusetts. Son of Benjamin Knight and Sarah Crouch. Lived at Marlboro, Windham Co., Vermont, by 1780. Married first Polly Peck, 1795, in Windham Co. Moved to Jericho (later Bainbridge...

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, another early supporter of JS, wrote that Joseph Sr.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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and Samuel Smith

13 Mar. 1808–30 July 1844. Farmer, logger, scribe, builder, tavern operator. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, by Mar. 1810; to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811...

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stopped at his home in Colesville

Area settled, beginning 1785. Formed from Windsor Township, Apr. 1821. Population in 1830 about 2,400. Villages within township included Harpursville, Nineveh, and Colesville. Susquehanna River ran through eastern portion of township. JS worked for Joseph...

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, New York, in January 1829 before going on to visit JS and Emma Smith

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

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. “I told him [Joseph Smith Sr.] they had traviled far enough,” Knight wrote, “[and] I would go with my sley and take them Down [to Harmony

Located in northeastern Pennsylvania. Area settled, by 1787. Organized 1809. Population in 1830 about 340. Population in 1840 about 520. Contained Harmony village (no longer in existence). Josiah Stowell hired JS to help look for treasure in area, Oct. 1825...

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] to morrow[.] I went Down and found them well and the[y] were glad to see us[.] we conversed about many things. in the morning I gave the old man a half a Dollar and Joseph a little money to Buoy [buy] paper to translate.”3

Knight, Reminiscences, 5.  


JS had apparently not translated

To produce a text from one written in another language; in JS’s usage, most often through divine means. JS considered the ability to translate to be a gift of the spirit, like the gift of interpreting tongues. He recounted that he translated “reformed Egyptian...

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since June 1828, and Knight’s provision of paper may have allowed him to resume translation. Within weeks of Knight’s visit, JS began translating again, with Emma, Samuel, and Martin Harris

18 May 1783–10 July 1875. Farmer. Born at Easton, Albany Co., New York. Son of Nathan Harris and Rhoda Lapham. Moved with parents to area of Swift’s landing (later in Palmyra), Ontario Co., New York, 1793. Married first his first cousin Lucy Harris, 27 Mar...

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each acting briefly as scribe.4

JS’s earliest history states that prior to Oliver Cowdery’s arrival in Pennsylvania on 5 April 1829, “my wife had writen some for me to translate and also my Brothr Samuel H Smith.” Isaac Hale and David Whitmer both indicated that Martin Harris, who wrote for JS in 1828, also served briefly as a scribe for the Book of Mormon translation around March 1829. Additional information was provided in interviews with Emma Smith and David Whitmer conducted in the 1870s and 1880s. Emma identified herself, Oliver Cowdery, Martin Harris, and her brother Reuben Hale as Book of Mormon scribes. David Whitmer named Oliver Cowdery, Martin Harris, Emma Smith, Emma’s brother Alva Hale, John Whitmer, and Christian Whitmer as scribes who contributed to the 1829 Book of Mormon manuscript. (JS History, ca. Summer 1832, [6]; Isaac Hale, Affidavit, Harmony, PA, 20 Mar. 1834, in “Mormonism,” Susquehanna Register, and Northern Pennsylvanian [Montrose, PA], 1 May 1834, [1]; Edward Stevenson, Sandusky, OH, to Franklin D. Richards, 10 Jan. 1887, in Stevenson, Journal, Oct. 1886–Mar. 1887, pp. 106–113; Joseph Smith III, “Last Testimony of Sister Emma,” Saints’ Herald, 1 Oct. 1879, 289–290; Stevenson, Journal, 22 Dec. 1877; “Interview with David Whitmer,” Deseret News [Salt Lake City], 21 Aug. 1878, 461; “Revelation Revisers,” Missouri Republican [St. Louis], 16 July 1884, 7; see also Skousen, Original Manuscript, 13–14.)  


Dictated shortly before the translation work resumed, this revelation spoke of a “marvelous work” about to come forth and added that the “field is white already to harvest.” These phrases, also used in several JS revelations in the spring of 1829, invoked a sense of urgency and an impending spiritual harvest.5

See, for example, Revelation, Apr. 1829–A [D&C 6:1, 3]; Revelation, May 1829–A [D&C 11:1, 3]; Revelation, May 1829–B [D&C 12:1, 3]; and Revelation, June 1829–A [D&C 14:1, 3].  


Though addressed to Joseph Smith Sr.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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, this revelation was written as if it could apply to all who read it.
The degree to which Joseph Smith Sr.

12 July 1771–14 Sept. 1840. Cooper, farmer, teacher, merchant. Born at Topsfield, Essex Co., Massachusetts. Son of Asael Smith and Mary Duty. Nominal member of Congregationalist church at Topsfield. Married to Lucy Mack by Seth Austin, 24 Jan. 1796, at Tunbridge...

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acted upon this revelation is unknown, but his call “to the work” may have had a significant immediate impact when he returned to Palmyra

Known as Swift’s Landing and Tolland before being renamed Palmyra, 1796. Incorporated, Mar. 1827, two years after completion of adjacent Erie Canal. Population in 1820 about 3,700. Joseph Sr. and Lucy Mack Smith family lived in village briefly, beginning ...

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, New York, where Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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was boarding at his house. Joseph Sr. and Lucy Mack Smith

8 July 1775–14 May 1856. Oilcloth painter, nurse, fund-raiser, author. Born at Gilsum, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire. Daughter of Solomon Mack Sr. and Lydia Gates. Moved to Montague, Franklin Co., Massachusetts, 1779; to Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont, 1788...

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had met Cowdery when he began teaching school in the Manchester

Settled 1793. Formed as Burt Township when divided from Farmington Township, 31 Mar. 1821. Name changed to Manchester, 16 Apr. 1822. Included village of Manchester. Population in 1825 about 2,700. Population in 1830 about 2,800. JS reported first vision of...

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, New York, district late in the fall of 1828. Lucy wrote that although Cowdery had questioned Joseph Sr. about the gold plates

A record engraved on gold plates, which JS translated and published as the Book of Mormon. The text explained that the plates were an abridgement of other ancient records and were written by an American prophet named Mormon and his son Moroni. The plates ...

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, he “did not succeed in eliciting any information” for “a long time.” This revelation may have prompted Joseph Sr. to share a “sketch of the facts which related to the plates” with Cowdery, who became convinced that he had been called by God to assist JS as his scribe.6

Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1844–1845, bk. 7, [12]; JS History, vol. A-1, 15.  


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