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Revelation, July 1830–A [D&C 24]

Money & for scrip15

See Matthew 6:25–34; 10:5–15; Mark 6:7–12; and Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 483 [3 Nephi 13:25–34].  


for thou art called to prune my vineyard with a mighty pruneing yea even for the last time16

See Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 137–138 [Jacob 5:61–72].  


yea & also all those whom thou hast ordained

The conferral of power and authority; to appoint, decree, or set apart. Church members, primarily adults, were ordained to ecclesiastical offices and other responsibilities by the laying on of hands by those with the proper authority. Ordinations to priesthood...

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& they shall do even according to this pattern amen [p. 34]
Money & for scrip15

See Matthew 6:25–34; 10:5–15; Mark 6:7–12; and Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 483 [3 Nephi 13:25–34].  


for thou art called to prune my vineyard  with a mighty pruneing yea even for the last time16

See Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 137–138 [Jacob 5:61–72].  


yea &  also all those which whom thou hast ordained

The conferral of power and authority; to appoint, decree, or set apart. Church members, primarily adults, were ordained to ecclesiastical offices and other responsibilities by the laying on of hands by those with the proper authority. Ordinations to priesthood...

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& they shall do even  according to this pattern amen [p. 34]
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During the two months after the Church of Christ

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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was organized, JS met with believers in three New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

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locations: the areas of Manchester

Settled 1793. Formed as Burt Township when divided from Farmington Township, 31 Mar. 1821. Name changed to Manchester, 16 Apr. 1822. Included village of Manchester. Population in 1825 about 2,700. Population in 1830 about 2,800. JS reported first vision of...

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, Fayette

Located in northern part of county between Seneca and Cayuga lakes. Area settled, by 1790. Officially organized as Washington Township, 14 Mar. 1800. Name changed to Fayette, 6 Apr. 1808. Population in 1830 about 3,200. Population in 1840 about 3,700. Significant...

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, and Colesville

Area settled, beginning 1785. Formed from Windsor Township, Apr. 1821. Population in 1830 about 2,400. Villages within township included Harpursville, Nineveh, and Colesville. Susquehanna River ran through eastern portion of township. JS worked for Joseph...

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. Several people were baptized

An ordinance in which an individual is immersed in water for the remission of sins. The Book of Mormon explained that those with necessary authority were to baptize individuals who had repented of their sins. Baptized individuals also received the gift of...

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and the first church conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

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was convened before JS returned home to his wife Emma

10 July 1804–30 Apr. 1879. Scribe, editor, boardinghouse operator, clothier. Born at Willingborough Township (later in Harmony), Susquehanna Co., Pennsylvania. Daughter of Isaac Hale and Elizabeth Lewis. Member of Methodist church at Harmony (later in Oakland...

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in Harmony

Located in northeastern Pennsylvania. Area settled, by 1787. Organized 1809. Population in 1830 about 340. Population in 1840 about 520. Contained Harmony village (no longer in existence). Josiah Stowell hired JS to help look for treasure in area, Oct. 1825...

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, Pennsylvania, around mid-June. About 26 June, JS, Emma, Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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, David Whitmer

7 Jan. 1805–25 Jan. 1888. Farmer, livery keeper. Born near Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Raised Presbyterian. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, shortly after birth. Attended German Reformed Church. Arranged...

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, and John Whitmer

27 Aug. 1802–11 July 1878. Farmer, stock raiser, newspaper editor. Born in Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Member of German Reformed Church, Fayette, Seneca Co., New York. Baptized by Oliver Cowdery, June 1829, most likely in Seneca...

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traveled to Colesville, where Emma and a number of others were baptized, even though several Colesville residents destroyed a previously constructed dam in the stream in an attempt to prevent the baptisms. Before these believers could be confirmed

After baptism, new converts were confirmed members of the church “by the laying on of the hands, & the giving of the Holy Ghost.” According to JS’s history, the first confirmations were administered at the organization of the church on 6 April 1830. By March...

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, however, JS was twice arrested and charged, as his history recounted, with “being a disorderly person; of setting the country in an uproar by preaching the Book of Mormon.”1

JS History, vol. A-1, 44; see also pp. 37–44. The baptisms took place on Monday, 28 June. According to Sarah (Sally) Coburn Knight’s obituary, she was baptized the next day, 29 June. (Obituary for Sally Knight, LDS Messenger and Advocate, Oct. 1834, 1:12–13.)  


He was released in both instances, but he needed the help of a constable to escape from his antagonists and make his way to the house of Emma’s sister, Elizabeth Hale Wasson, in Harpursville

Also spelled Harpersville. Post village located on banks of Susquehanna River. Population in 1842 about 200. JS wrote letter from Kirtland, Ohio, 3 Mar. 1831, to brother, Hyrum, by way of Harpursville post office.

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, where he and Emma were reunited. They returned to Harmony the next day, quite likely 3 July, and a few days later JS and Cowdery came back to Colesville to confirm the recently baptized converts. Before they could do so, a mob assembled, and JS and Cowdery quickly left again.2

JS History, vol. A-1, 44–48. JS spent the night of 30 June in the custody of Constable Ebenezer Hatch preceding his court appearance on 1 July 1830 before Justice Joseph Chamberlin in South Bainbridge. After JS’s acquittal on 1 July, he was immediately arrested again and tried before Justice Joel K. Noble in Colesville, apparently on 2 July. After his discharge, JS and Emma probably spent the night at the home of Benjamin and Elizabeth Hale Wasson in Harpursville. (Ebenezer Hatch, Bill of Services, 4 July 1830, Chenango County Historical Society, Norwich, NY; Trial bill, 1 June 1830, People v. JS [J.P. Ct. 1830], Chenango County Courthouse, Norwich, NY; “Mormonism,” Morning Star, 16 Nov. 1832, 114; Knight, Reminiscences, 8; see also [Abram W. Benton], “Mormonites,” Evangelical Magazine and Gospel Advocate, 9 Apr. 1831, 120; “Mormonism,” Boston Christian Herald, 19 Sept. 1832, [2]–[3]; Joel K. Noble to Jonathan B. Turner, Bainbridge, NY, 8 Mar. 1842, Illinois State Historical Society, Springfield; “Some of the Remarks of John S. Reed,” Times and Seasons, 1 June 1844, 5:549–552; and John S. Reed, Mexico, NY, to Brigham Young, 6 Dec. 1861, Brigham Young Office Files, CHL.)  


Sometime between their return to Harmony and Cowdery’s departure for Fayette around mid-July,3

Oliver Cowdery apparently left early enough in the month that before the end of July, he had made the roughly three-day journey to Fayette and sent JS a letter, and JS had sent a return letter to Cowdery, traveled to Fayette, and returned to Harmony. (JS History, vol. A-1, 50–51.)  


JS dictated this and the following two revelations. This text instructed JS and Cowdery “concerning their Calls”; JS had earlier been identified as prophet, seer

The Book of Mormon identified a seer as a “revelator, and a prophet also,” specifying, however, that a seer was “greater than a prophet.” A seer could “know of things which has past, and also of things which is to come.” The work of a seer included translation...

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, and translator, as well as an apostle

A title indicating one sent forth to preach; later designated as a specific ecclesiastical and priesthood office. By 1830, JS and Oliver Cowdery were designated as apostles. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church explained that an “apostle is an elder...

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and first elder

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

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, and Cowdery as second elder.4
The revelation specifically commanded JS to continue confirming baptized believers, dictating revelations, and expounding the scriptures

The sacred, written word of God containing the “mind & will of the Lord” and “matters of divine revelation.” Members of the church considered the Bible, the Book of Mormon, and JS’s revelations to be scripture. Revelations in 1830 and 1831 directed JS to ...

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, and commanded Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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(and perhaps JS with him)5

The use of pronouns such as “ye” and “you” is ambiguous, making it impossible to distinguish between plural or singular commands.  


to go forth and preach. Although the word apostle is not used in this passage, the language describing Cowdery’s calling closely parallels Jesus’s instructions to his apostles. For Cowdery, it may have reinforced the June 1829 revelation describing him as having the same calling as “Paul mine apostle”6 and the 6 April 1830 revelation that referred to him as “mine Apostle.”7

Revelation, 6 Apr. 1830 [D&C 21:10]. Though mockingly, the Palmyra Reflector referred to Cowdery in this vein, calling him “the apostle to the NEPHITES.” The 6 April revelation also designated Cowdery “the first Preacher of this Church unto the Church & before the world.” (News Item, Reflector [Palmyra, NY], 1 June 1830, 28, emphasis in original; Revelation, 6 Apr. 1830 [D&C 21:12].)  


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