26033

Revelation, March 1829 [D&C 5]

Behold I say unto you that my servant1 hath desired A witness that my Servant Joseph hath got the things2

The 1835 edition of the Doctrine and Covenants has “plates.” (Doctrine and Covenants 32:1, 1835 ed. [D&C 5:1].)  


which he hath testified that he hath got and now Behold thus shall ye say unto him I the Lord am God I have given these things unto him & I have commanded him that he should stand as A witness of these things nevertheless I have caused him that he should enter into A covenant

A binding agreement between two parties, particularly between God and man. The term covenant was often associated with “commandments,” referring to revelation texts. The gospel as preached by JS—including the need for faith, repentance, baptism, and reception...

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with me that he should not show them except I Command him & he hath no power over them except I grant it unto him & he hath A gift to translate

To produce a text from one written in another language; in JS’s usage, most often through divine means. JS considered the ability to translate to be a gift of the spirit, like the gift of interpreting tongues. He recounted that he translated “reformed Egyptian...

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the Book3

On the “gift to translate,” see “Joseph Smith Documents Dating through June 1831.”  


& I have commanded him that he shall pretend to no other gift for I will grant unto him no other gift and verily I say unto you that woe shall come unto the Inhabitents of the Earth if they will not hearken unto my words for Behold if they will not believe my words they would not believe my servants if it were possible he could show them all things O ye unbelieving ye stiffnecked Generation Behold I have reserved the things which have been spoken of which I have entrusted to my servant for A wise perpose in me & it shall be made Known unto future Generations but for this Generation they shall have my word yea & the testimony of three of my Servants shall go forth with my word unto this Generation yea three shall Know of A surety that those things are true for I will give them power that they may Behold & vew these things as they are4

Three men—Oliver Cowdery, David Whitmer, and Martin Harris—attested in June 1829 that an angel from heaven presented the plates for their inspection. Their testimony was published in the first edition of the Book of Mormon in 1830 and in all subsequent editions. In addition to affirming that they saw the plates, they stated, “We also know that they [the plates] have been translated by the gift and power of God, for his voice hath declared it unto us.” (Testimony of Three Witnesses, Late June 1829; see also Historical Introduction to Revelation, June 1829–E [D&C 17].)  


& to none else will I grant this power among this Generation5

Shortly after the experience of the Three Witnesses, eight others stated that they had seen and handled the plates. (Testimony of Eight Witnesses, Late June 1829.)  


& the testimony of three Witnesses will I send forth6

JS later translated Book of Mormon passages about the three chosen witnesses. (See Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 110, 548 [2 Nephi 27:12; Ether 5:2–4].)  


& my word & behold whosoever beleaveth in my word him will I visit with the manifestations of my spirit & they shall be Born of me & their testimony shall also go forth & thus if the People of this Generation harden not their hearts I will work a reformation among them & I will put down all lieings & deceivings & Priest Craft

The misuse of religious authority for personal gain or prestige. The Book of Mormon stated that “priestcrafts are that men preach and set themselves up for a light unto the world, that they may get gain, and praise of the world; but they seek not the welfare...

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& envyings & strifes & Idolatries and sorceries7

In the nineteenth century, “sorceries” referred to illicit magical practices usually wrought “by the assistance or supposed assistance of evil spirits.” (“Sorcery,” in American Dictionary.)  


& all maner of Iniquities & I will establish my Church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

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yea even the church which was taught by my Desiples8

Establishing a church was again referred to in a revelation not long after the reception of this revelation. (Revelation, Spring 1829 [D&C 10:53].)  


& now if this Generation do hardon their hearts [p. 1]
Behold I say unto you that my servant1 hath desired  A witness that my Servant Joseph hath got the things2

The 1835 edition of the Doctrine and Covenants has “plates.” (Doctrine and Covenants 32:1, 1835 ed. [D&C 5:1].)  


w hich he hath testified that he hath got and now Behold thu s shall ye say unto him I the Lord am God I have given these  things unto him & I have commanded him that he should  stand as A witness of these things nevertheless I have  caused him that he should enter into A covenant

A binding agreement between two parties, particularly between God and man. The term covenant was often associated with “commandments,” referring to revelation texts. The gospel as preached by JS—including the need for faith, repentance, baptism, and reception...

View Glossary
with  me that he should not show them except I Command him  & he hath no power over them e[x]cept I grant it unto him &  he hath A gift to translate

To produce a text from one written in another language; in JS’s usage, most often through divine means. JS considered the ability to translate to be a gift of the spirit, like the gift of interpreting tongues. He recounted that he translated “reformed Egyptian...

View Glossary
the Book3

On the “gift to translate,” see “Joseph Smith Documents Dating through June 1831.”  


& I have commanded  him that he should shall pretend to no other gift for I will  grant unto him no other gift and verily I say unto you  that woe shall come unto the Inhabitents of the Earth  if they will not hearken unto my words for Behold if  they will not believe my words they would not believe  my servants if it were possible he could show them  all things O ye unbelieving ye stiffnecked Generation Beho ld I have reserved the things which have been spoken of  which I have entrusted to my servant for A wise per pose in me & it shall be made Known unto future  Generations but for this Generation they shall have  my word yea & the testimony of three of my Servan ts shall go forth with my word unto this Generation  yea three shall Know of A surety that those things are  true for I will give them power that they may Behold  & vew these things as they are4

Three men—Oliver Cowdery, David Whitmer, and Martin Harris—attested in June 1829 that an angel from heaven presented the plates for their inspection. Their testimony was published in the first edition of the Book of Mormon in 1830 and in all subsequent editions. In addition to affirming that they saw the plates, they stated, “We also know that they [the plates] have been translated by the gift and power of God, for his voice hath declared it unto us.” (Testimony of Three Witnesses, Late June 1829; see also Historical Introduction to Revelation, June 1829–E [D&C 17].)  


& to none else will I gran t this power among this Generation5

Shortly after the experience of the Three Witnesses, eight others stated that they had seen and handled the plates. (Testimony of Eight Witnesses, Late June 1829.)  


& the testimony  of three Witnesses will I send forth6

JS later translated Book of Mormon passages about the three chosen witnesses. (See Book of Mormon, 1830 ed., 110, 548 [2 Nephi 27:12; Ether 5:2–4].)  


& my word & be hold whosoever beleaveth in my word him will I visit  with the manifestations of my spirit & they shall be Born  of me & their testimony shall also go forth & thus  if the People of this Generation harden not their  hearts I will work a reformation among them & I will  put down all lieings & deceivings & Priest Craft

The misuse of religious authority for personal gain or prestige. The Book of Mormon stated that “priestcrafts are that men preach and set themselves up for a light unto the world, that they may get gain, and praise of the world; but they seek not the welfare...

View Glossary
&  envyings & strifes & Idolatries and sorceries7

In the nineteenth century, “sorceries” referred to illicit magical practices usually wrought “by the assistance or supposed assistance of evil spirits.” (“Sorcery,” in American Dictionary.)  


& all ma ner of Iniquities & I will establish my Church

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
yea  even the church which was taught by my Des iples8

Establishing a church was again referred to in a revelation not long after the reception of this revelation. (Revelation, Spring 1829 [D&C 10:53].)  


& now if this Generation do hardon their hea rts [p. 1]
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Revelation, [Harmony Township

Located in northeastern Pennsylvania. Area settled, by 1787. Organized 1809. Population in 1830 about 340. Population in 1840 about 520. Contained Harmony village (no longer in existence). Josiah Stowell hired JS to help look for treasure in area, Oct. 1825...

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, Susquehanna Co., PA, Mar. 1829]. Featured version copied [ca. Apr. 1829]; handwriting of Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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; three pages; Newel K. Whitney, Papers, BYU. Includes docket, later notations, and archival marking.
Single foolscap page folded in half to create two leaves, each measuring 12⅜ × 7½ inches (31 × 19 cm). Docket in handwriting of Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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on the verso of the final leaf reads “Respecting translating the | Book of mormon”. Other writing, consisting of unrelated lists of names and mathematical calculations, in both pencil and ink by an unidentified scribe appears to have been created circa mid-1830.
This document is part of a collection of revelations found within the Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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Papers, which comprise three different groups of material: early Mormon material, largely relating to the finances of the church; Newel K. Whitney personal papers; and Whitney family papers. The Whitney papers include nineteen manuscript revelations. The dates of the majority of the revelations indicate that Whitney, likely in his role as bishop of the church, received and retained copies of revelations from mid-1831 through late 1833. Because the featured text was dictated well before Whitney joined the church, it is unknown when or under what circumstances Whitney acquired this manuscript.
According to the register of the Newel K. Whitney

3/5 Feb. 1795–23 Sept. 1850. Trader, merchant. Born at Marlborough, Windham Co., Vermont. Son of Samuel Whitney and Susanna Kimball. Moved to Fairfield, Herkimer Co., New York, 1803. Merchant at Plattsburg, Clinton Co., New York, 1814. Mercantile clerk for...

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Papers, following the death of Whitney, his daughter Mary Jane, who married Isaac Groo, obtained possession of the papers. The Brigham Young University library, Provo, Utah, acquired these papers from descendants of Mary Jane and Isaac Groo between 1969 and 1974.
All extant versions of this revelation that bear a date have it as March 1829. Although the featured version gives no explicit date of creation, Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

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’s handwriting provides a clue to the dating. This document appears to provide one of only two known samples of Cowdery’s early stylized or formalized handwriting. The other is a 6 April 1829 agreement between JS and his father-in-law, Isaac Hale

21 Mar. 1763–11 Jan. 1839. Farmer, hunter, innkeeper. Born in Waterbury, New Haven Co., Connecticut. Son of Reuben Hale and Diantha Ward. Member of Methodist church. Moved to Wells, Albany Co., New York (later in Rutland Co., Vermont), ca. 1771, to live with...

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.1 Once Cowdery began taking dictation from JS of the Book of Mormon translation, his handwriting evolved into the style that characterized his handwriting for the remainder of his life. If, as the similarities of handwriting style would suggest, this copy of the revelation was created around the same time as the above-mentioned agreement, the document would have been created circa April 1829. This creation date would make this the earliest extant version of any revelation text dictated by JS.

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