26077

Revelation, September 1830–F [D&C 31]

Those that revile8

See 1 Peter 2:23.  


govern thy house in meekness & be steadfast Behold I say unto you that thou shalt be a Physician unto the Church but not unto the World for they will not receive thee9

Two accounts in Marsh’s brief autobiography indicate that during the early years of his church membership he was called upon to act in a medical capacity. While en route from Ohio to Missouri, he was summoned to care for a “br. Blackslee” suffering from cholera but was unable to reach him in time to treat him. Another time he cared for Joseph Knight, who was “sick with the bloody flux,” or dysentery. (“T B Marsh,” [1]–[2], Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, ca. 1858–1880, CHL.)  


go thy way whithersoever I will & it shall be given thee by the Comforter what thou shalt do & whither thou shalt go pray always lest ye enter into temptation & loose thy reward be faithful unto the end & Lo! I am with you these words are not of man neither of men but of me even Jesus Christ your Redeemer by the will of the father even so amen [p. 44]
Those that revile8

See 1 Peter 2:23.  


govern thy house in meekness & be  steadfast Behold I say unto you that thou shalt be a P[h]ysician  unto the Church but not unto the World for they will not  receive thee9

Two accounts in Marsh’s brief autobiography indicate that during the early years of his church membership he was called upon to act in a medical capacity. While en route from Ohio to Missouri, he was summoned to care for a “br. Blackslee” suffering from cholera but was unable to reach him in time to treat him. Another time he cared for Joseph Knight, who was “sick with the bloody flux,” or dysentery. (“T B Marsh,” [1]–[2], Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, ca. 1858–1880, CHL.)  


go thy way whithersoever I will & it shall be  given thee by the Comforter what thou shalt do &  whither thou shalt go pray always lest ye enter into  temptation & loose thy reward be faithful unto the end  & Lo! I am with you these words are not of man neither  of men but of me even Jesus Christ your Redeemer by  the will of the father even so amen [p. 44]
Previous
According to his history, JS dictated this revelation for Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

View Full Bio
during the 26 September 1830 conference

A meeting where ecclesiastical officers and other church members could conduct church business. The “Articles and Covenants” of the church directed the elders to hold conferences to perform “Church business.” The first of these conferences was held on 9 June...

View Glossary
.1

JS History, vol. A-1, 58–60.  


Marsh, a resident of Charlestown, Massachusetts,2

1830 U.S. Census, Charlestown, Middlesex Co., MA, 42.  


who had earlier been affiliated with the Methodist church, first learned of JS and his activities when he visited Palmyra

First permanent white settlers arrived, ca. 1789. Included village of Palmyra. Erie Canal opened, 1825, in southern portion of township. Population in 1810 about 2,200. Population in 1830 about 3,400. Home of Joseph Sr. and Lucy Mack Smith family, beginning...

More Info
, New York, in 1829. He later recounted that in the summer of that year, “I thought the Spirit required me to make a journey West. I started in co[mpan]y. with on[e] Benj. Hall, who was also led by the Spirit. We went to Lima Livingston Co N. Y. where we stayed some 3 mos. and then left for home.” Before returning home, however, he stopped in Lyons, just fifteen miles east of Palmyra, where he learned of the printing of the Book of Mormon. He then traveled on to Palmyra, where he met Martin Harris

18 May 1783–10 July 1875. Farmer. Born at Easton, Albany Co., New York. Son of Nathan Harris and Rhoda Lapham. Moved with parents to area of Swift’s landing (later in Palmyra), Ontario Co., New York, 1793. Married first his first cousin Lucy Harris, 27 Mar...

View Full Bio
, saw proof sheets of the first pages of the Book of Mormon, and spoke with Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
, who, according to Marsh, “gave me all the information concer[n]ing the Book I wanted.” Marsh returned to his home interested in what he had learned and carrying the first sixteen printed pages of the book.3

“T B Marsh,” [1], Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, ca. 1858–1880, CHL.  


On 25 October, Marsh wrote to Cowdery to express his interest in the little band of believers and to inquire about their welfare. Cowdery reported to JS that although Marsh had found some unwilling to listen, he had talked “to Some respecting our work.”4 The correspondence continued, but the letters are no longer extant. After learning by letter of the April organization of the Church of Christ

The Book of Mormon related that when Christ set up his church in the Americas, “they which were baptized in the name of Jesus, were called the church of Christ.” The first name used to denote the church JS organized on 6 April 1830 was “the Church of Christ...

View Glossary
, Marsh and his family moved to Palmyra in September 1830. Shortly before the second conference of the church in late September, David Whitmer

7 Jan. 1805–25 Jan. 1888. Farmer, livery keeper. Born near Harrisburg, Dauphin Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Peter Whitmer Sr. and Mary Musselman. Raised Presbyterian. Moved to Ontario Co., New York, shortly after birth. Attended German Reformed Church. Arranged...

View Full Bio
baptized

An ordinance in which an individual is immersed in water for the remission of sins. The Book of Mormon explained that those with necessary authority were to baptize individuals who had repented of their sins. Baptized individuals also received the gift of...

View Glossary
Marsh and Oliver Cowdery ordained

The conferral of power and authority; to appoint, decree, or set apart. Church members, primarily adults, were ordained to ecclesiastical offices and other responsibilities by the laying on of hands by those with the proper authority. Ordinations to priesthood...

View Glossary
him an elder

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
, most likely shortly before JS dictated this revelation.5

“T B Marsh,” [1], Historian’s Office, Histories of the Twelve, ca. 1858–1880, CHL.  


Echoing revelations from April and June of 1829 that called for the formation of a church and the gathering of believers, this text emphasized the urgency of the work and admonished Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

View Full Bio
to “thrust in thy Sickle with all thy Soul.” Like Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
, Hyrum Smith

9 Feb. 1800–27 June 1844. Farmer, cooper. Born at Tunbridge, Orange Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Randolph, Orange Co., 1802; to Tunbridge, before May 1803; to Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont, 1804; to Sharon, Windsor Co., by...

View Full Bio
, and others before him, as well as Ezra Thayer

14 Oct. 1791–6 Sept. 1862. Farmer, gardener, builder. Born in New York. Married Elizabeth Frank. Lived at Bloomfield, Ontario Co., New York, 1820. Lived at Farmington, Ontario Co., 1830. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt and confirmed by JS, fall...

View Full Bio
and Northrop Sweet

19 Feb. 1802–23 Feb. 1881. Farmer. Born in New York. Married first Elethan Harris, before 1828. Moved to Palmyra, Wayne Co., New York, by June 1830. Baptized into LDS church by Parley P. Pratt, by Oct. 1830, in Palmyra. Appointed to serve mission, Oct. 1830...

View Full Bio
soon after, Marsh was reminded that the “harvest” was near; in vivid apocalyptic language, the revelation warned that the field was “already to be burned.”6
The revelation also addressed Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

View Full Bio
’s understandable concerns about his family’s welfare as he traveled and preached, promising him that his family would be blessed during his absence. Though the revelation does not indicate where he was to preach, he remained in New York

Located in northeast region of U.S. Area settled by Dutch traders, 1620s; later governed by Britain, 1664–1776. Admitted to U.S. as state, 1788. Population in 1810 about 1,000,000; in 1820 about 1,400,000; in 1830 about 1,900,000; and in 1840 about 2,400,...

More Info
until the spring of 1831 and corresponded with relatives in Massachusetts

One of original thirteen colonies that formed U.S. Capital city, Boston. Colonized by English religious dissenters, 1620s. Population in 1830 about 610,000. Population in 1840 about 738,000. Joseph Smith Sr. born in Massachusetts. Samuel Smith and Orson Hyde...

More Info
, urging them to join the believers.7

Thomas B. Marsh and Elizabeth Godkin Marsh to Lewis Abbott and Ann Marsh Abbott, [ca. 11 Apr. 1831], Abbott Family Collection, CHL.  


In June 1831 he was called to travel to Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
and preach along the way.8

Revelation, 6 June 1831 [D&C 52:22].  


Facts