53993132

Revelations printed in Evening and Morning Star, January 1835–June 1836

Revelations printed in Evening and Morning Star, January 1835–June 1836

cate from the judge or bishop

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. JS appointed Edward Partridge as the first bishop in February 1831. Following this appointment, he functioned as the local leader of the church in Missouri. Later revelations described a bishop’s duties as receiving...

View Glossary
in this part of the vineyard, unto the bishop in Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the focus ...

View Glossary
, rendereth every man acceptable, and answereth all things, for an inheritance

Generally referred to land promised by or received from God for the church and its members. A January 1831 revelation promised church members a land of inheritance. In March and May 1831, JS dictated revelations commanding members “to purchase lands for an...

View Glossary
, and to be received as a wise steward

One who managed property and goods under the law of consecration; also someone given a specific ecclesiastical responsibility. According to the “Laws of the Church of Christ,” members of the church were to make donations to the bishop, who would record the...

View Glossary
, and as a faithful laborer; otherwise he shall not be accepted of the bishop in Zion. And now, verily I say unto you, let every elder

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
who shall give an account unto the bishop of the church, in this part of the vineyard, be recommended by the church or churches, in which he labors, that he may render himself and his accounts approved in all things. And again, let my servants who are appointed stewards over the literary concerns

The branch of the United Firm responsible for church publications. In November 1831, a revelation appointed JS, Martin Harris, Oliver Cowdery, John Whitmer, Sidney Rigdon, and William W. Phelps as “stewards over the revelations & commandments.” In March 1832...

View Glossary
of my church, have claim for assistance upon the bishop or bishops, in all things, that the revelations may be published, and go forth unto the ends of the earth, that they also may obtain funds which shall benefit the church, in all things: that they also may render themselves approved in all things and be accounted as wise stewards. And now, behold this shall be an ensample for all the extensive branches of my church, in whatsoever land they shall be established. And now I make an end of my sayings.— Amen.
A few words in addition to the laws

Principles given to the church and its members in February 1831 revelations. In January 1831, a revelation promised the saints in New York that the law would be given after they gathered in Ohio. Once in Ohio, on 9 and 23 February 1831, JS dictated two revelations...

View Glossary
of the kingdom, respecting the members of the church; they that are appointed by the Holy Spirit to go up unto Zion; and they who are privileged to go up unto Zion. Let them carry up unto the bishop a certificate from three elders of the church, or a certificate from the bishop, otherwise he who shall go up unto the land of Zion, shall not be accounted as a wise steward. This is also an ensample. Amen. [p. 107]
cate from the judge or bishop

An ecclesiastical and priesthood office. JS appointed Edward Partridge as the first bishop in February 1831. Following this appointment, he functioned as the local leader of the church in Missouri. Later revelations described a bishop’s duties as receiving...

View Glossary
in this part of  the vineyard, unto the bishop in Zion

A specific location in Missouri; also a literal or figurative gathering of believers in Christ, characterized by adherence to ideals of harmony, equality, and purity. In JS’s earliest revelations “the cause of Zion” was used to broadly describe the focus ...

View Glossary
, ren dereth every man acceptable, and answereth  all things, for an inheritance

Generally referred to land promised by or received from God for the church and its members. A January 1831 revelation promised church members a land of inheritance. In March and May 1831, JS dictated revelations commanding members “to purchase lands for an...

View Glossary
, and to be re ceived as a wise steward

One who managed property and goods under the law of consecration; also someone given a specific ecclesiastical responsibility. According to the “Laws of the Church of Christ,” members of the church were to make donations to the bishop, who would record the...

View Glossary
, and as a faithful  laborer; otherwise he shall not be accepted of  the bishop in Zion. And now, verily I say  unto you, let every elder

A male leader in the church generally; an ecclesiastical and priesthood office or one holding that office; a proselytizing missionary. The Book of Mormon explained that elders ordained priests and teachers and administered “the flesh and blood of Christ unto...

View Glossary
who shall give an  account unto the bishop of the church, in  this part of the vineyard, be recommended by  the church or churches, in which he labors,  that he may render himself and his accounts  approved in all things. And again, let my  servants who are appointed stewards over the  literary concerns

The branch of the United Firm responsible for church publications. In November 1831, a revelation appointed JS, Martin Harris, Oliver Cowdery, John Whitmer, Sidney Rigdon, and William W. Phelps as “stewards over the revelations & commandments.” In March 1832...

View Glossary
of my church, have claim  for assistance upon the bishop or bishops, in  all things, that the revelations may be pub lished, and go forth unto the ends of the  earth, that they also may obtain funds which  shall benefit the church, in all things: that  they also may render themselves approved in  all things and be accounted as wise stewards.  And now, behold this shall be an ensample  for all the extensive branches of my church,  in whatsoever land they shall be established.  And now I make an end of my sayings.—  Amen.
A few words in addition to the laws

Principles given to the church and its members in February 1831 revelations. In January 1831, a revelation promised the saints in New York that the law would be given after they gathered in Ohio. Once in Ohio, on 9 and 23 February 1831, JS dictated two revelations...

View Glossary
of the  kingdom, respecting the members of the  church; they that are appointed by the Holy  Spirit to go up unto Zion; and they who are  privileged to go up unto Zion. Let them  carry up unto the bishop a certificate from  three elders of the church, or a certificate  from the bishop, otherwise he who shall go  up unto the land of Zion, shall not be ac counted as a wise steward. This is also an  ensample. Amen. [p. 107]
PreviousNext
In December 1833, six months after the printing office

JS revelations, dated 20 July and 1 Aug. 1831, directed establishment of LDS church’s first printing office in Independence, Missouri. Dedicated by Bishop Edward Partridge, 29 May 1832. Located on Lot 76, on Liberty Street just south of courthouse square....

More Info
in Independence

Located twelve miles from western Missouri border. Permanently settled, platted, and designated county seat, 1827. Hub for steamboat travel on Missouri River. Point of departure for Santa Fe Trail. Population in 1831 about 300. Mormon population by summer...

More Info
, Missouri, was destroyed

20 Jul. 1833

Vigilantes, demanding removal of Latter-day Saints from Jackson County, Missouri, destroyed printing office and tarred and feathered Edward Partridge and Charles Allen, Independence, Jackson County, Missouri; a few dozen copies of unfinished Book of Commandments...

and publication efforts there were permanently halted, printing commenced on a newly acquired press in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
, Ohio. That press, operated by F. G. Williams & Co.

After the destruction of the church printing office in Missouri in 1833, the United Firm formed F. G. Williams & Co. as a commercial entity in Kirtland, Ohio, with publishing as its primary purpose. Following the dissolution of the United Firm in 1834, F....

View Glossary
, continued printing The Evening and the Morning Star, the newspaper begun in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, through September 1834. The September 1834 issue of that paper contained a prospectus announcing that the paper’s two volumes would be reprinted.1

“Prospectus,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Sept. 1834, 192.  


The first issue of the reprinted newspaper, which appeared under the slightly modified title Evening and Morning Star, was published in January 1835.2

The title that appears in the newspaper’s nameplate was likely shortened because of a reduction in the newspaper’s size. The longer original title, The Evening and the Morning Star, is printed at the middle and end of each issue with other publication information. For the sake of clarity, the reprinted paper is referred to by its shortened title for all references in The Joseph Smith Papers.  


Though touted as a reprint that would correct typographical and other errors,3

“Prospectus,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Sept. 1834, 192.  


Evening and Morning Star actually contained significant changes to the revelation texts. In the first issue, editor Oliver Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
explained the revisions he was making in the reprinted versions of the revelations:
On the revelations we merely say, that we were not a little surprised to find the previous print so different from the original. We have given them a careful comparison, assisted by individuals whose known integrity and ability is uncensurable. Thus saying we cast no reflections upon those who were entrusted with the responsibility of publishing them in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
, as our own labors were included in that important service to the church, and it was our unceasing endeavor to have them correspond with the copy furnished us. We believe they are now correct. If not in every word, at least in principle.4

Notice, Evening and Morning Star, June 1832 (Jan. 1835), 16. The prospectus to Evening and Morning Star also states “that in the first 14 numbers, in the Revelations, are many errors, typographical, and others, occasioned by transcribing manuscript; but as we shall have access to originals, we shall endeavor to make proper corrections.” (“Prospectus,” The Evening and the Morning Star, Sept. 1834, 192.)  


Despite the implications of Cowdery

3 Oct. 1806–3 Mar. 1850. Clerk, teacher, justice of the peace, lawyer, newspaper editor. Born at Wells, Rutland Co., Vermont. Son of William Cowdery and Rebecca Fuller. Raised Congregationalist. Moved to western New York and clerked at a store, ca. 1825–1828...

View Full Bio
’s statement, very few of the changes in the reprint represent a restoration back to the earliest text, though Cowdery consulted early manuscript sources when reprinting some of the revelations.5

On 4 February 1835, Cowdery wrote to Newel K. Whitney requesting that the latter send “the original copy of the Revelation given to 12 elders Feb. 1831 called ‘The Law of the Church.’” Cowdery explained, “We are preparing the old Star for re-printing, and have no copy from which to correct, and kno[w] of no other beside yours.” (Oliver Cowdery, Kirtland, OH, to Newel K. Whitney, 4 Feb. 1835, Newel K. Whitney, Papers, BYU.)  


Because the revelations were meant to be used as a guide for the current operations of the church, they were edited in 1835 to reflect current organization, doctrine, and practice, which had continued to develop since the revelations were first dictated. For example, the version of a 9 February 1831 revelation printed in Evening and Morning Star includes discussion of the duties of elders, priests, teachers, bishops, high priests, and the high council.6

Revelation, 9 Feb. 1831, in “Extract of Covenants for the Church of the Latter Day Saints,” Evening and Morning Star, July 1832 (Feb. 1835), 30–31 [D&C 42].  


Early versions of the revelation, however, make no mention of the office of high priest, which did not exist until June 1831,7

See Minute Book 2, 3 June 1831.  


or of the high council, a body that was not organized until February 1834.8

Minute Book 1, 17 Feb. 1834; see also Minutes, 17 Feb. 1834, in Doctrine and Covenants 5, 1835 ed. [D&C 102].  


The revelation was revised in 1835 to reflect these additional roles. Most of the changes made to revelations in the early issues of Evening and Morning Star are also reflected in the same revelations as published in the first edition of the Doctrine and Covenants (1835), and the editing work on that volume, in turn, influenced the presentation of revelations in later issues of Evening and Morning Star.9

For example, the updates made in Revelation, 9 February 1831, for publication in Evening and Morning Star were then introduced into Doctrine and Covenants 13:8, 10, 19, 1835 ed. [D&C 42:31, 34, 71].  


The table that follows lists each of the revelatory items printed in the Star and its reprint, along with its bibliographic information. See Revelations Printed in The Evening and the Morning Star for a side-by-side comparison of the revelations printed in the Star and its reprint.
Key to column titles
Vol:Issue:Volume and issue number
Star Print Date:Month in which the item was printed in The Evening and the Morning Star
Star Pages:Pages on which the item was printed in The Evening and the Morning Star
Reprint Print Date:Month in which the item was printed in Evening and Morning Star
Reprint Pages:Pages on which the item was printed in Evening and Morning Star
Date:Date of item, followed by section number in Doctrine and Covenants, 1981 edition, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
Vol: IssueStar Print DateStar PagesReprint Print DateReprint PagesDate
1:1June 1832[1]Jan. 18352–410 Apr. 1830 [D&C 20]
1:1June 1832[1]–[2]16 Apr. 1830 [D&C 22]
1:1June 1832[2]Jan. 18355–6ca. 7 Mar. 1831 [D&C 45:1–67, 71]
1:2July 1832[1]Feb. 183530–319 and 23 Feb. 1831 [D&C 42:11–77]
1:2July 1832[1]Feb. 183526–277 Aug. 1831 [D&C 59]
1:2July 1832[2]–[3]Feb. 183527–3016 Feb. 1832 [D&C 76]
1:3Aug. 1832[1]Mar. 183542–43ca. 8 Mar. 1831–A [D&C 46]
1:3Aug. 1832[1]Mar. 183543–449 May 1831 [D&C 50]
1:4Sept. 1832[2]Apr. 183560–62Sept. 1830–A [D&C 29]
1:4Sept. 1832[2]Apr. 18356230 Oct. 1831 [D&C 65]
1:5Oct. 1832[2]June 18357423 Feb. 1831 [D&C 42:78-93]
1:5Oct. 1832[2]–[3]June 183574Feb. 1831–A [D&C 43:15–35]
1:5Oct. 1832[3]June 183573–741 Nov. 1831–A [D&C 68]
1:6Nov. 1832[7]Sept. 183593–947 May 1831 [D&C 49]
1:7Dec. 1832[5]Apr. 1836105–10612 Aug. 1831 [D&C 61]
1:7Dec. 1832[5]–[6]Apr. 1836106–1074 Dec. 1831 [D&C 72]
1:8Jan. 1833[5]–[6]Apr. 1836125–1262 Jan. 1831 [D&C 38]
1:8Jan. 1833[6]Apr. 183612630 Apr. 1832 [D&C 83]
1:9Feb. 1833[5]May 183613827–28 Dec. 1832 [D&C 88:117–126]
1:9Feb. 1833[6]–[7]May 1836140–14130 Aug. 1831 [D&C 63:1–64]
1:10Mar. 1833[6]May 1836155ca. Aug. 1830 [D&C 27]
1:10Mar. 1833[6]May 1836155–1561 Nov. 1831–B [D&C 1]
1:10Mar. 1833[6]May 1836156–1573 Jan. 1833 [D&C 88:127–137]
1:12May 1833[1]–[2]June 1836177–1793 Nov. 1831 [D&C 133]
2:13June 183397–98June 1836193–19610 Apr. 1830 [D&C 20]

Facts