43990780

Selections from Elders’ Journal, November 1837

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We would say to the patrons of the Journal, that we calculate to pursue a different course from that of our predecessor in the editorial department.—We will endeavor not to scandalize our own citizens, especially when there is no foundation in truth for so doing; we consider that when a man scandalizes his neighbor, it follows of course that he designs to cover his own iniquity: we consider him who puts his foot upon the neck of his benefactor, an object of pitty rather than revenge, for in so doing he not only shows the contraction of his own mind but the wickedness of his heart also.
And as there are shaving shops in the world, we would caution the subscribers of the Star and Messenger and Advocate to send their subscriptions agreeable to the notice given in this number, and furthermore those who have had deal with the office, or bindery, those who have books or other articles at this office will please hand or send the money to the persons named in the above alluded notice, also all applications for books or back Nos. of the Star and Messenger and Advocate, and for books to be rebound &c. &c. &c. to be made to the same persons, who will wait upon them with pleasure. The reason of this notice is, that our subscribers as well as ourselves may not suffer loss. O confidence where hast thou fled! Whither art thou gone? Art thou in search of lucre, is it he which has destroyed thee?
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Be it known unto the Saints scattered abroad greeting:
That myself together with my beloved brother Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, having been appointed by a general conference of elders held in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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in the house of the Lord

JS revelation of Jan. 1831 directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” JS Revelation of Dec. 1832 directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS Revelation of 1 June 1833 chastened Saints...

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on the 18th of Sept. for the purpose of establishing places of gathering for the Saints &c. we therefore would inform our readers that we started from Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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in company with Vinson Knight

14 Mar. 1804–31 July 1842. Farmer, druggist, school warden. Born at Norwich, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Rudolphus Knight and Rispah (Rizpah) Lee. Married Martha McBride, 14 Mar. 1826. Moved to Perrysburg, Cattaraugus Co., New York, by Mar. 1834....

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and Wm. Smith

13 Mar. 1811–13 Nov. 1893. Farmer, newspaper editor. Born at Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811; to Norwich, Windsor Co., 1813; and to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816...

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on the 27th of Sept. last, for the purpose of vislting [visiting] the Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, and also to discover situations suitable for the location of the Saints who are gathering for a refuge and safety, in the day of the wrath of God which is soon to burst upon the head of this generation, according to the testimony of the prophets; who speak expressly concerning the last days: We had a prosperous and a speedy journey; we held one meeting in Norton township

Area first settled, 1814. Formed from Wolf Creek Township, 1818. Reported location of “great Mormon excitement,” 1832–1838. Population in 1830 about 650. Primarily populated by immigrants from New England states. Increased German Pennsylvanian immigration...

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Ohio, and three in Doublin, Ia. one between Doublin and Terre Haute

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

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, Ia. two in Tere Haute

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

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, one in Palmyra, Mo. 2 in Huntsville

Located in north-central Missouri. Settled in 1820s. Randolph Co. seat. Described in 1837 as having brick courthouse and seven stores, but no church buildings. Members of 1834 Camp of Israel and 1838 Kirtland Camp passed through Huntsville en route to Missouri...

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, one in Carlton; all of which were tended with good success and generally allayed the prejudice and feeling of the people as we judge from the treatment we received, being kindly and hospitably entertained. On our arrival at the city of Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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, we [p. 27]
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We would say to the patrons of the  Journal, that we calculate to pursue a  different course from that of our prede cessor in the editorial department.— We will endeavor not to scandalize our  own citizens, especially when there is  no foundation in truth for so doing; we  consider that when a man scandalizes  his neighbor, it follows of course that  he designs to cover his own iniquity:  we consider him who puts his foot up on the neck of his benefactor, an ob ject of pitty rather than revenge, for  in so doing he not only shows the con traction of his own mind but the wick edness of his heart also.
And as there are shaving shops in  the world, we would caution the sub scribers of the Star and Messenger and  Advocate to send their subscriptions  agreeable to the notice given in this  number, and furthermore those who  have had deal with the office, or bin dery, those who have books or other  articles at this office will please hand  or send the money to the persons nam ed in the above alluded notice, also all  applications for books or back Nos. of  the Star and Messenger and Advocate,  and for books to be rebound &c.  &c. &c. to be made to the same per sons, who will wait upon them with  pleasure. The reason of this notice  is, that our subscribers as well as our selves may not suffer loss. O confi dence where hast thou fled! Whither  art thou gone? Art thou in search of  lucre, is it he which has destroyed  thee?
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Be it known unto the Saints scatter ed abroad greeting:
That myself together with  my beloved brother Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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,  having been appointed by a general  conference of elders held in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
 in the house of the Lord

JS revelation of Jan. 1831 directed Latter-day Saints to migrate to Ohio, where they would “be endowed with power from on high.” JS Revelation of Dec. 1832 directed Saints to “establish . . . an house of God.” JS Revelation of 1 June 1833 chastened Saints...

More Info
on the 18th  of Sept. for the purpose of establish ing places of gathering for the Saints  &c. we therefore would inform our  readers that we started from Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

More Info
 in company with V[inson] Knight

14 Mar. 1804–31 July 1842. Farmer, druggist, school warden. Born at Norwich, Hampshire Co., Massachusetts. Son of Rudolphus Knight and Rispah (Rizpah) Lee. Married Martha McBride, 14 Mar. 1826. Moved to Perrysburg, Cattaraugus Co., New York, by Mar. 1834....

View Full Bio
and Wm.  Smith

13 Mar. 1811–13 Nov. 1893. Farmer, newspaper editor. Born at Royalton, Windsor Co., Vermont. Son of Joseph Smith Sr. and Lucy Mack. Moved to Lebanon, Grafton Co., New Hampshire, 1811; to Norwich, Windsor Co., 1813; and to Palmyra, Ontario Co., New York, 1816...

View Full Bio
on the 27th of Sept. last, for the  purpose of vislting [visiting] the Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, and  also to discover situations suitable for  the location of the Saints who are gath ering for a refuge and safety, in the  day of the wrath of God which is soon  to burst upon the head of this genera tion, according to the testimony of the  prophets; who speak expressly con cerning the last days: We had a pros perous and a speedy journey; we held  one meeting in Norton township

Area first settled, 1814. Formed from Wolf Creek Township, 1818. Reported location of “great Mormon excitement,” 1832–1838. Population in 1830 about 650. Primarily populated by immigrants from New England states. Increased German Pennsylvanian immigration...

More Info
Ohio,  and three in Doublin, Ia. one between  Doublin and Ter[r]e Haute

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

More Info
, Ia. two in  Tere Haute

Situated high on east bank of Wabash River. French settlement, 1720–1763; name is French for “high land.” Founded as Fort Harrison, 1811. Laid out and incorporated, 1816. Vigo Co. seat. Population in 1830 about 600; in 1837 about 1,100; and in 1840 about ...

More Info
, one in Palmyra, Mo. 2 in  Huntsville

Located in north-central Missouri. Settled in 1820s. Randolph Co. seat. Described in 1837 as having brick courthouse and seven stores, but no church buildings. Members of 1834 Camp of Israel and 1838 Kirtland Camp passed through Huntsville en route to Missouri...

More Info
, one in Carlton; all of which  were tended with good success and  generally allayed the prejudice and  feeling of the people as we judge from  the treatment we received, being kind ly and hospitably entertained. On our  arrival at the city of Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, we [p. 27]
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In the final issue of the Latter Day Saints’ Messenger and Advocate, dated September 1837, a prospectus appeared announcing the forthcoming publication of the Elders’ Journal of the Church of Latter Day Saints. The following month, the first issue of the new paper appeared. The short-lived newspaper ran only four issues—two in Kirtland

Located ten miles south of Lake Erie. Settled by 1811. Organized by 1818. Population in 1830 about 55 Latter-day Saints and 1,000 others; in 1838 about 2,000 Saints and 1,200 others; in 1839 about 100 Saints and 1,500 others. Mormon missionaries visited township...

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, Ohio, dated October and November 1837; and two in Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
, Missouri, dated July and August 1838. For the two Far West issues, the title of the paper was changed to Elders’ Journal of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. JS is listed as editor for each of the four issues, with Thomas B. Marsh

1 Nov. 1800–Jan. 1866. Farmer, hotel worker, waiter, horse groom, grocer, type foundry worker, teacher. Born at Acton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of James Marsh and Molly Law. Married first Elizabeth Godkin, 1 Nov. 1820, at New York City. Moved to ...

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listed as proprietor or publisher. It is unknown how labor was divided on the newspaper or how much immediate responsibility JS had for the content. The paper presumably would have continued with additional issues in Missouri

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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had it not been for the escalating violence between Mormons and non-Mormons in late 1838, which culminated in the Mormons being driven from the state. After settling at Commerce

Located near middle of western boundary of state, bordering Mississippi River. European Americans settled area, 1820s. From bank of river, several feet above high-water mark, ground described as nearly level for six or seven blocks before gradually sloping...

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, Illinois, the Saints began publishing a new paper, the Times and Seasons—though explicitly not as a successor to the Elders’ Journal.
Because of JS’s involvement as editor of the Elders’ Journal, the Joseph Smith Papers will publish the significant editorial content from each issue as a collection of documents. Some of the individual items are signed “Ed[itor]” while others are not. Each of these collections is titled “Selections from Elders’ Journal” and dated with the month and year of publication for the issue.

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