53992725

Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840, Second Edition

and purchases were making of their lands and crops (the land consisted in pre-emption rights, as the land in that part of the county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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had not as yet come into market) every day, and payment made until there was some twenty-five thousand dollars worth of property bought from the mob in improvements and crops. While these operations were going on, the mob would occasionally boast that when they had got payment for their lands and crops they would rise up and drive the Saints out and keep both their lands and their crops. They also sold a large quantity of hogs, some cattle and sheep and other property. These threatenings were making continually, but the Saints did not, however, entertain any great fears of their doing so—but the sequel will show that their threats were real.
While the mob was operating thus, in Daviess county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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, there were scattering families in other counties which had to suffer violence also at the hand of their neighbors. In Livingston county

Organized 1837. Population in 1840 about 4,300. Hawn’s Mill Massacre planned by mob in eastern part of county.

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a family by the name of Lathrop, who lived on a farm which they had purchased from a man by the name of James Weldon, was attacked, Mr. Lathrop was driven from home—his wife and some of his family were sick—after he was driven away one of his children died, and his wife was there alone and laying very sick; and there were twenty-five or thirty armed men around the house threatening her husband’s life, if he attempted to come home. In this situation Mrs. Lathrop lay without attendance, surrounded by a body of armed ruffians; and while in this situation her child died, and her husband dare not return to comfort her. Her own situation at the time being delicate, and terrified by the mob, her condition was afflicting in the extreme. The mob took and buried her child. A body of armed men was sent by the authorities to relieve her—they arrived at the place and found the mob there, the most of whom fled at their approach. They took the woman and her goods and family which remained, and brought her off with them, with another family by the name of Jackson. Mr. Jackson had also been driven from his family. Mrs. Lathrop survived the abuse but a very short time. There were also scattering families of the saints in Ray

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

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, Clay

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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and other counties, who were severely threatened, and some left the country out of fear, at the sacrifice of much property.
We have already mentioned that after the mob had been turned into militia, and disbanded as such, they went to Carroll county to attack a settlement of the saints in that place. The mob in Corrill county began to assemble on the first of October, 1838. We are not able to state the precise day; but it was as early as the first week of the month. We will now leave the affairs of Daviess county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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and the other counties to give an account of the settlement in Carroll; for the history of the others which remain is identified with the history of this settlement, and the things which befel it.
Some time in the last week in March, 1838, a man by the name of Henry Root

14 June 1813–9 Apr. 1895. Auctioneer, merchant, banker. Born at Clinton, Upper Canada. Son of Henry Ruth and Marie Overholt. Purchased interest in town of De Witt (first called Eldersport), Carroll Co., Missouri, 1837. Sold lots to Latter-day Saints. Moved...

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, who was a large proprietor in the town plat of De Witt

Located on bluffs north of Missouri River, about six miles above mouth of Grand River. Permanently settled, by 1826. Laid out, 1836. First called Elderport; name changed to De Witt, 1837, when town acquired by speculators David Thomas and Henry Root, who ...

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, on the Missouri river

One of longest rivers in North America, in excess of 3,000 miles. From headwaters in Montana to confluence with Mississippi near Saint Louis, Missouri river drains 580,000 square miles (about one-sixth of continental U.S.). Explored by Lewis and Clark, 1804...

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, arrived at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

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. He was the bearer of a letter from a Mr. David Thomas

12 May 1797–25 Apr. 1845. Born at Flat Rock District, Bourbon Co., Kentucky. Son of Richard Thomas and Elizabeth Bowles. Married Martha Parker, 17 Mar. 1816. Migrated to Carrollton, Carroll Co., Missouri, 1833. With Henry Root, landowner at De Witt, Carroll...

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, who had been a merchant in Carrollton, the county seat of Carroll county, but at the time he wrote this letter was living within a few miles of De Wit

Located on bluffs north of Missouri River, about six miles above mouth of Grand River. Permanently settled, by 1826. Laid out, 1836. First called Elderport; name changed to De Witt, 1837, when town acquired by speculators David Thomas and Henry Root, who ...

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, having purchased a large tract of land at that place, say some fourteen hundred acres. [p. 27]
and purchases were making of their lands and crops (the land con sisted in pre-emption rights, as the land in that part of the county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
had  not as yet come into market) every day, and payment made until there  was some twenty-five thousand dollars worth of property bought  from the mob in improvements and crops. While these operations  were going on, the mob would occasionally boast that when they had  got payment for their lands and crops they would rise up and drive  the Saints out and keep both their lands and their crops. They also  sold a large quantity of hogs, some cattle and sheep and other pro perty. These threatenings were making continually, but the Saints  did not, however, entertain any great fears of their doing so—but the  sequel will show that their threats were real.
While the mob was operating thus, in Daviess county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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, there were  scattering families in other counties which had to suffer violence also  at the hand of their neighbors. In Livingston county

Organized 1837. Population in 1840 about 4,300. Hawn’s Mill Massacre planned by mob in eastern part of county.

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a family by the  name of Lathrop, who lived on a farm which they had purchased  from a man by the name of James Weldon, was attacked, Mr. La throp was driven from home—his wife and some of his family were  sick—after he was driven away one of his children died, and his wife  was there alone and laying very sick; and there were twenty-five or  thirty armed men around the house threatening her husband’s life, if  he attempted to come home. In this situation Mrs. Lathrop lay with out attendance, surrounded by a body of armed ruffians; and while in  this situation her child died, and her husband dare not return to com fort her. Her own situation at the time being delicate, and terrified  by the mob, her condition was afflicting in the extreme. The mob  took and buried her child. A body of armed men was sent by the  authorities to relieve her—they arrived at the place and found the  mob there, the most of whom fled at their approach. They took the  woman and her goods and family which remained, and brought her  off with them, with another family by the name of Jackson. Mr.  Jackson had also been driven from his family. Mrs. Lathrop sur vived the abuse but a very short time. There were also scattering  families of the saints in Ray

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

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, Clay

Settled ca. 1800. Organized from Ray Co., 1822. Original size diminished when land was taken to create several surrounding counties. Liberty designated county seat, 1822. Population in 1830 about 5,000; in 1836 about 8,500; and in 1840 about 8,300. Refuge...

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and other counties, who were  severely threatened, and some left the country out of fear, at the  sacrifice of much property.
We have already mentioned that after the mob had been turned into  militia, and disbanded as such, they went to Carroll county to attack a  settlement of the saints in that place. The mob in Corrill county  began to assemble on the first of October, 1838. We are not able  to state the precise day; but it was as early as the first week of the  month. We will now leave the affairs of Daviess county

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
and the  other counties to give an account of the settlement in Carroll; for  the history of the others which remain is identified with the history  of this settlement, and the things which befel it.
Some time in the last week in March, 1838, a man by the name of  Henry Root

14 June 1813–9 Apr. 1895. Auctioneer, merchant, banker. Born at Clinton, Upper Canada. Son of Henry Ruth and Marie Overholt. Purchased interest in town of De Witt (first called Eldersport), Carroll Co., Missouri, 1837. Sold lots to Latter-day Saints. Moved...

View Full Bio
, who was a large proprietor in the town plat of De Wit[t]

Located on bluffs north of Missouri River, about six miles above mouth of Grand River. Permanently settled, by 1826. Laid out, 1836. First called Elderport; name changed to De Witt, 1837, when town acquired by speculators David Thomas and Henry Root, who ...

More Info
,  on the Missouri river

One of longest rivers in North America, in excess of 3,000 miles. From headwaters in Montana to confluence with Mississippi near Saint Louis, Missouri river drains 580,000 square miles (about one-sixth of continental U.S.). Explored by Lewis and Clark, 1804...

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, arrived at Far West

Originally called Shoal Creek. Located fifty-five miles northeast of Independence. Surveyed 1823; first settled by whites, 1831. Site purchased, 8 Aug. 1836, before Caldwell Co. was organized for Latter-day Saints in Missouri. William W. Phelps and John Whitmer...

More Info
. He was the bearer of a  letter from a Mr. David Thomas

12 May 1797–25 Apr. 1845. Born at Flat Rock District, Bourbon Co., Kentucky. Son of Richard Thomas and Elizabeth Bowles. Married Martha Parker, 17 Mar. 1816. Migrated to Carrollton, Carroll Co., Missouri, 1833. With Henry Root, landowner at De Witt, Carroll...

View Full Bio
, who had been a merchant in Carroll ton, the county seat of Carroll county, but at the time he wrote this  letter was living within a few miles of De Wit

Located on bluffs north of Missouri River, about six miles above mouth of Grand River. Permanently settled, by 1826. Laid out, 1836. First called Elderport; name changed to De Witt, 1837, when town acquired by speculators David Thomas and Henry Root, who ...

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, having purchased a  large tract of land at that place, say some fourteen hundred acres. [p. 27]
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Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, An Appeal to the American People: Being an Account of the Persecutions of the Church of Latter Day Saints; and of the Barbarities Inflicted on Them by the Inhabitants of the State of Missouri, second edition; i-vi, 7–60 pp.; Cincinnati, OH: Shepard and Stearns, 1840. The copy used herein is held at CHL.

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