53992724

Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

Lewis, Alexander Campbell, Warren Smith

1794–30 Oct. 1838. Blacksmith. Son of Chileab Smith and Nancy. Born in Massachusetts. Married Amanda Barnes, 9 July 1826, at Black River (later in Lorain), Lorain Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church, 1831. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1832. Labored...

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, Sardius Smith, George Richards, Mr. William Napier, Mr. Harmer Austin Hammer, Mr. Simon Cox, Mr. Abbot Hiram Abbott

?–Dec. 1838. Son of Rufus Abbott. Resided in Ray Co., Missouri, by July 1838. Mortally wounded during attack at Hawn’s Mill settlement on Shoal Creek, Caldwell Co., Missouri, 30 Oct. 1838.

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, Mr. John York

Ca. 1778–30 Oct. 1838. Married Hannah Hammer, 8 Jan. 1801, in Randolph Co., North Carolina. Moved to Milford, Butler Co., Ohio by 1820. Moved to Henry Co., Indiana, by 1830. Likely baptized into LDS church. Moved to Hawn’s Mill settlement on Shoal Creek, ...

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, Wm. Merrick a boy 8 or 9 years old, and three or four more, whose names I do not recollect, as they were strangers to me. Among the wounded who recovered were Isaac Laney Leany, who had six balls shot through him, two through his body, one through each arm, and the other two through his hips. Nathan K. Knight shot through the body; Mr. William Yokum who was severely wounded, besides being shot through the head, Jacob Myers

11 Aug. 1782–17 Oct. 1867. Farmer, millwright. Born at Pence, Northumberland Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Frederick Myers and Elizabeth Wirick. Married Sarah Colman, 5 Jan. 1804, at Jefferson Co., Ohio. Lived in Richland Co., Ohio, 1804–ca. 1836. Baptized into...

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, —— George Myers, Larlton Tarlton Lewis

18 May 1805–22 Nov. 1890. Farmer, carpenter, colonizer. Born in Pendleton, Pendleton Co., South Carolina. Son of Neriah Lewis and Mary Morse. Moved to Kentucky, 1809. Married Malinda Gimlin, 27 Mar. 1828, likely in Simpson Co., Kentucky. Moved to Macoupin...

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, Mr. Haunn

13 Jan. 1804–27 Jan. 1860. Miller, builder, carpenter. Born in Genesee Co., New York. Son of Henry Hawn. Consistently spelled surname as “Hawn” throughout life, but many contemporary records spelled name as “Haun.” Married Harriet Elizabeth Pierson, 18 Nov...

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, and several others. Miss Mary Stedwell, while fleeing, was shot through the hand and fainting, fell over a log, into which they shot upwards of twenty balls.
To finish their work of destruction, this band of murderers, composed of men from Daviess

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

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, Livingston

Organized 1837. Population in 1840 about 4,300. Hawn’s Mill Massacre planned by mob in eastern part of county.

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, Ray

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

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, Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

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, and Corrill Counties; led by some of the principal men of that section of the upper country, proceeded to rob the houses, wagons and tents, of bedding and clothing; drove off horses and wagons, leaving widows and orphans distitute of the necessaries of life; and even stripped the clothing, from the bodies of the slain!
According to their own account, they fired seven rounds in this awful massacre, making upwards of fifteen hundred shots at a little company of men of about thirty in number!
I certify the above, to be a true statement of facts relative to the above mentioned massacre according to my best recollection.
(Signed) JOSEPH YOUNG

7 Apr. 1797–16 July 1881. Farmer, painter, glazier. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Moved to Auburn, Cayuga Co., New York, before 1830. Joined Methodist church, before Apr. 1832. Baptized into LDS...

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.
JANE A. YOUNG

14 Aug. 1814–15 Jan. 1913. Born in Utica, Oneida Co., New York. Daughter of Calvin Field Bicknell and Chloe Seymour. Moved to Geneseo, Livingston Co., New York, 1817; to Livonia, Livingston Co., by 1830; and back to Geneseo, by 1834. Baptized into LDS church...

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.
A short time previous to the massacre at Shoal Creek

Stream that flows eastward for about forty-five miles from east central Clinton Co. through Caldwell Co. to confluence with Grand River in central Livingston Co. Thousands of Saints moved from Clay Co. to sites along Shoal Creek in Caldwell Co., beginning...

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, we made peace with the mob characters living near us, as declaration had been made by the leaders of the band, that all persons who would not take up arms against the society, should, with the Mormons, be driven out of the State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

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; and thus drawing the division line so close that we thought it necessary to ascertain the feelings of our neighbors around us. We met them and an agreement was entered into between us, that we would live in peace, let others do as they would. A large number of our [p. 56]
Lewis, Alexander Campbell, Warren Smith

1794–30 Oct. 1838. Blacksmith. Son of Chileab Smith and Nancy. Born in Massachusetts. Married Amanda Barnes, 9 July 1826, at Black River (later in Lorain), Lorain Co., Ohio. Baptized into LDS church, 1831. Moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, 1832. Labored...

View Full Bio
, Sardius  Smith, George Richards, Mr. [William] Napier, Mr. Harmer [Austin Hammer], Mr.  [Simon] Cox, Mr. Abbot [Hiram Abbott]

?–Dec. 1838. Son of Rufus Abbott. Resided in Ray Co., Missouri, by July 1838. Mortally wounded during attack at Hawn’s Mill settlement on Shoal Creek, Caldwell Co., Missouri, 30 Oct. 1838.

View Full Bio
, Mr. [John] York

Ca. 1778–30 Oct. 1838. Married Hannah Hammer, 8 Jan. 1801, in Randolph Co., North Carolina. Moved to Milford, Butler Co., Ohio by 1820. Moved to Henry Co., Indiana, by 1830. Likely baptized into LDS church. Moved to Hawn’s Mill settlement on Shoal Creek, ...

View Full Bio
, Wm. Merrick a boy 8 or 9 years  old, and three or four more, whose names I do not recol lect, as they were strangers to me. Among the wound ed who recovered were Isaac Laney [Leany], who had six balls  shot through him, two through his body, one through each  arm, and the other two through his hips. Nathan K.  Knight shot through the body; Mr. [William] Yokum who was  severely wounded, besides being shot through the head,  Jacob Myers

11 Aug. 1782–17 Oct. 1867. Farmer, millwright. Born at Pence, Northumberland Co., Pennsylvania. Son of Frederick Myers and Elizabeth Wirick. Married Sarah Colman, 5 Jan. 1804, at Jefferson Co., Ohio. Lived in Richland Co., Ohio, 1804–ca. 1836. Baptized into...

View Full Bio
, —— [George] Myers, Larlton [Tarlton] Lewis

18 May 1805–22 Nov. 1890. Farmer, carpenter, colonizer. Born in Pendleton, Pendleton Co., South Carolina. Son of Neriah Lewis and Mary Morse. Moved to Kentucky, 1809. Married Malinda Gimlin, 27 Mar. 1828, likely in Simpson Co., Kentucky. Moved to Macoupin...

View Full Bio
, Mr. Haunn

13 Jan. 1804–27 Jan. 1860. Miller, builder, carpenter. Born in Genesee Co., New York. Son of Henry Hawn. Consistently spelled surname as “Hawn” throughout life, but many contemporary records spelled name as “Haun.” Married Harriet Elizabeth Pierson, 18 Nov...

View Full Bio
, and  several others. Miss Mary Stedwell, while fleeing, was  shot through the hand and fainting, fell over a log, into  which they shot upwards of twenty balls.
To finish their work of destruction, this band of mur derers, composed of men from Daviess

Area in northwest Missouri settled by European Americans, 1830. Sparsely inhabited until 1838. Created from Ray Co., Dec. 1836, in attempt to resolve conflicts related to Mormon settlement in that region. County is transected diagonally from northwest to ...

More Info
, Livingston

Organized 1837. Population in 1840 about 4,300. Hawn’s Mill Massacre planned by mob in eastern part of county.

More Info
, Ray

Located in northwestern Missouri. Area settled, 1815. Created from Howard Co., 1820. Initially included all state land north of Missouri River and west of Grand River. Population in 1830 about 2,700; in 1836 about 6,600; and in 1840 about 6,600. Latter-day...

More Info
,  Caldwell

Located in northwest Missouri. Settled by whites, by 1831. Described as being “one-third timber and two-thirds prairie” in 1836. Created specifically for Latter-day Saints by Missouri state legislature, 29 Dec. 1836, in attempt to solve “Mormon problem.” ...

More Info
, and Corrill Counties; led by some of the prin cipal men of that section of the upper country, proceed ed to rob the houses, wagons and tents, of bedding and  clothing; drove off horses and wagons, leaving widows  and orphans distitute of the necessaries of life; and even  stripped the clothing, from the bodies of the slain!
According to their own account, they fired seven  rounds in this awful massacre, making upwards of fifteen  hundred shots at a little company of men of about thirty  in number!
I certify the above, to be a true statement of facts re lative to the above mentioned massacre according to my  best recollection.
(Signed) JOSEPH YOUNG

7 Apr. 1797–16 July 1881. Farmer, painter, glazier. Born at Hopkinton, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts. Son of John Young and Abigail (Nabby) Howe. Moved to Auburn, Cayuga Co., New York, before 1830. Joined Methodist church, before Apr. 1832. Baptized into LDS...

View Full Bio
.
JANE A. YOUNG

14 Aug. 1814–15 Jan. 1913. Born in Utica, Oneida Co., New York. Daughter of Calvin Field Bicknell and Chloe Seymour. Moved to Geneseo, Livingston Co., New York, 1817; to Livonia, Livingston Co., by 1830; and back to Geneseo, by 1834. Baptized into LDS church...

View Full Bio
.
A short time previous to the massacre at Shoal Creek

Stream that flows eastward for about forty-five miles from east central Clinton Co. through Caldwell Co. to confluence with Grand River in central Livingston Co. Thousands of Saints moved from Clay Co. to sites along Shoal Creek in Caldwell Co., beginning...

More Info
,  we made peace with the mob characters living near us,  as declaration had been made by the leaders of the band,  that all persons who would not take up arms against the  society, should, with the Mormons, be driven out of the  State

Area acquired by U.S. in Louisiana Purchase, 1803, and established as territory, 1812. Missouri Compromise, 1820, admitted Missouri as slave state, 1821. Population in 1830 about 140,000; in 1836 about 240,000; and in 1840 about 380,000. Mormon missionaries...

More Info
; and thus drawing the division line so close that we  thought it necessary to ascertain the feelings of our neigh bors around us. We met them and an agreement was  entered into between us, that we would live in peace,  let others do as they would. A large number of our [p. 56]
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Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, An Appeal to the American People: Being an Account of the Persecutions of the Church of Latter Day Saints; and of the Barbarities Inflicted on Them by the Inhabitants of the State of Missouri; 1–84 pp.; Cincinnati, OH: Glezen and Shepard, stereotypers and printers, 1840. The copy used herein is held at Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.

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