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Sidney Rigdon, Appeal to the American People, 1840

company living at the mill at that time, were immigrants who had just came into the place. On the first day of November 1838, without apprehending any danger whatever from the mob, we were visited by about three hundred mounted men, coming with great speed, and fell upon us with the ferocity of tigers. They were not discovered until within one hundred and fifty yards of us. They immediately commenced firing upon us, without asking us to surrender, or giving us a chance to surrender, or even giving us to understand what they wanted, only as we were taught by the sound of guns, the groans of the dying, and the screams of the women and children, being only about forty in number, and wholly unprepared to engage in any contest whatever. We were forced to take shelter under cover of an old log building, used as a black-smith’s shop, which was neither chincked or mudded.
When men ran out and called for peace they were shot down; when they held up their hats and handkerchiefs and crying for mercy, they were shot down; when they attempted to run, they were cut down by the fire of guns; and when they stood still, they were shot down by putting their guns through the cracks of the building. After pleading for mercy, and having none shown us, and seeing they were determined to slaughter us en masse, and many of our brethern slain around us, leaving our numbers but few, and seeing it was but death for us, we concluded to sell our lives as dear as possible, and soon commenced firing at the mob who were firing from all directions at us. But few of the mob were injured in consequence of their shielding themselves by trees and logs; women and children were equally brutally treated with the men, and found no place upon the sympathies of these murderers. One woman by the name of Mary Steadwell was shot through the hand while holding it up in the attitude of defence. As she ran from the mob, others pierced her clothes; after running as far as she could, she threw herself behind a log, whilst a volley of balls poured after her, filling the log where she lay, twelve or fourteen of which were taken out and preserved for future generations to witness. Many other women had balls shot through their clothes, while fleeing into the woods with their children [p. 57]
company living at the mill at that time, were immigrants  who had just came into the place. On the first day of  November 1838, without apprehending any danger what ever from the mob, we were visited by about three hundred  mounted men, coming with great speed, and fell upon us  with the ferocity of tigers. They were not discovered until  within one hundred and fifty yards of us. They immediate ly commenced firing upon us, without asking us to sur render, or giving us a chance to surrender, or even giving  us to understand what they wanted, only as we were  taught by the sound of guns, the groans of the dying, and  the screams of the women and children, being only about  forty in number, and wholly unprepared to engage in any  contest whatever. We were forced to take shelter un der cover of an old log building, used as a black-smith’s  shop, which was neither chincked or mudded.
When men ran out and called for peace they were shot  down; when they held up their hats and handkerchiefs  and crying for mercy, they were shot down; when they  attempted to run, they were cut down by the fire of guns;  and when they stood still, they were shot down by put ting their guns through the cracks of the building. Af ter pleading for mercy, and having none shown us, and  seeing they were determined to slaughter us en masse,  and many of our brethern slain around us, leaving our  numbers but few, and seeing it was but death for us, we  concluded to sell our lives as dear as possible, and soon  commenced firing at the mob who were firing from all di rections at us. But few of the mob were injured in con sequence of their shielding themselves by trees and logs;  women and children were equally brutally treated with  the men, and found no place upon the sympathies of these  murderers. One woman by the name of Mary Steadwell  was shot through the hand while holding it up in the at titude of defence. As she ran from the mob, others pierc ed her clothes; after running as far as she could, she threw  herself behind a log, whilst a volley of balls poured after  her, filling the log where she lay, twelve or fourteen of  which were taken out and preserved for future generations  to witness. Many other women had balls shot through  their clothes, while fleeing into the woods with their children [p. 57]
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Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, An Appeal to the American People: Being an Account of the Persecutions of the Church of Latter Day Saints; and of the Barbarities Inflicted on Them by the Inhabitants of the State of Missouri; 1–84 pp.; Cincinnati, OH: Glezen and Shepard, stereotypers and printers, 1840. The copy used herein is held at Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.

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