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Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

them with great fury. Among the number was a Mrs Higbee, the wife of a John S Higbee, from Cincinnatti

Area settled largely by emigrants from New England and New Jersey, by 1788. Village founded and surveyed adjacent to site of Fort Washington, 1789. First seat of legislature of Northwest Territory, 1790. Incorporated as city, 1819. Developed rapidly as shipping...

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, who was very sick with fever, and also had an infant at the breast. She was under the necessity of spending this night of storm exposed to all its violence, having nothing but the earth to sleep on. After spending the night in this distressed condition, early in the morning another Mrs Keziah String Higbee the wife of Isaac Higbee was delivered of a babe without any bed but the earth, or covering but the heavens.
There were many, sick who were thus inhumanly driven from their houses and had to endure all this abuse and suffering, and seek homes where it could be found . The result was that a number being deprived of the comforts of life and the necessary attendance, died; many children were left orphans, wives widows, and husbands widowers.
The mob, after thus abusing the people, the hundredth part of which is not told here, took possession of the farms of those whom they had thus drven from their homes, and all their cattle, horses, hogs, sheep, &c which amounted to many thousands; together with all their household stuff of every kind, amounting to many thousand dollars worth, and have forbid under pain of death, any of them returning to get any of their property, and if any of them did attempt it, if discovered, they were whipped and other wise abused, and one or two who attempted it, were nearly killed. They escaped
There were, in addition, to flock and herds, which the mob took from the saints, large fields of corn, to the amount of many hundred acres, I might say thousands, all ready to harvest, which they took as their own. There were also many hundred acres of wheat, which had been sown, that they also took possession of, and keep them all till this day.
[p. [4[b]]]
them with great fury. Among the number was a  Mrs Higbee, the wife of a John S Higbee, from  Cincinnatti

Area settled largely by emigrants from New England and New Jersey, by 1788. Village founded and surveyed adjacent to site of Fort Washington, 1789. First seat of legislature of Northwest Territory, 1790. Incorporated as city, 1819. Developed rapidly as shipping...

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, who was very sick with fever, and also  had an infant at the breast. She was under the  necessity of sleeping <spending> this night of storm exposed to  all its violence, having nothing but the earth to  sleep on. After spending the night in this distressed  condition, early in the morning another Mrs [Keziah String] Higbee  the wife of Isaac Higbee who was delivered of a babe  without any bed but the earth, or covering but the  heavens. of the number
There were many, sick out of the number who  were thus inhumanly driven from <their houses> home and had to endu re all this abuse and suffering, and seek homes where  it could be fo[u]nd for them. The result was that a nu mber being deprived of the comforts of life and the necess a[r]y attendance, died; many children were left orphans,  wives widows, and husbands widowers.
The mob, after thus abusing the people,  the hundredth part of which is not told here,  took possession of the farms of those whom they  had thus drven from their homes, and all their  cattle, horses, hogs, sheep, &c which amounted to  many thousands; together with all their house hold stuff of every kind, amounting to many  thousand dollars worth, and <have> forbid under pain  of death, any of the saints ret saintes <them> returning  to get any of their property, and if any <any> of  <them> did attempt it, if discovered, they were whipped  and other wise abused, and one or two who  attempted it, were nearly killed. They did come <escaped>  for with their lives and no more. What shews the  the brutallity of that people, as much as any other thing  is that the wives of these barbarians laughed, at  and rjoiced, when they heard of their husbands attemp ting to violate the chastity of the females, and other  wise in insulted them insult them.
There were, in addition, to flock and herds,  which the mob took from the saints, a large  field fields of corn, to the amount of many  hundred acres, I might say thousands, all ready  to harvest, which they took as their own. There  were also many hundred acres of wheat, which  had been sown, that they also took possession of, and  keep them all till this day.
After they had plundered the houses robbed  the henroost and carried off all the goods, they [p. [4[b]]]
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Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), ca. Sept. 1838–ca. Oct. 1839; handwriting of Sidney Rigdon

19 Feb. 1793–14 July 1876. Tanner, farmer, minister. Born at St. Clair, Allegheny Co., Pennsylvania. Son of William Rigdon and Nancy Gallaher. Joined United Baptists, ca. 1818. Preached at Warren, Trumbull Co., Ohio, and vicinity, 1819–1821. Married Phebe...

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, Elias Higbee

23 Oct. 1795–8 June 1843. Clerk, judge, surveyor. Born at Galloway, Gloucester Co., New Jersey. Son of Isaac Higbee and Sophia Somers. Moved to Clermont Co., Ohio, 1803. Married Sarah Elizabeth Ward, 10 Sept. 1818, in Tate Township, Clermont Co. Lived at ...

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, George W. Robinson

14 May 1814–10 Feb. 1878. Clerk, postmaster, merchant, clothier, banker. Born at Pawlet, Rutland Co., Vermont. Baptized into LDS church and moved to Kirtland, Geauga Co., Ohio, by 1836. Clerk and recorder for Kirtland high council, beginning Jan. 1836. Married...

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, David Lewis

10 Apr. 1814–2 Sept. 1855. Cooper, farmer, photographer. Born in Warren Co. (later in Simpson Co.), Kentucky. Son of Neriah Lewis and Mary Morse. Married Duritha Trail, 23 Nov. 1834. Baptized into LDS church, 24 Mar. 1835. Ordained an elder, 1835. Moved to...

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, and two unidentified scribes; sixty-four leaves, forty-nine pages of text with fifteen blank pages; JS Collection, CHL.

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